Secret In The Sky

Round and round the Earth it goes, who or what it’s spying on very few people know.

Delta 4 rocket successfully lofts surveillance satellite

A Delta 4 rocket made a thunderous departure from California on Tuesday afternoon, only to slip into a news blackout minutes later while it climbed higher and faster to deploy a classified spy satellite, a success-defining milestone that was confirmed by hobbyist observers.

The United Launch Alliance-made booster roared away from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 4:12:57 p.m. local (7:12:57 p.m. EDT; 2312:57 GMT) on a southwesterly course to reach a retrograde orbit inclined 123 degrees relative to the equator.

. . .

The hush-hush nature for the rest of flight is all part of launching covert payloads for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, the secretive agency that operates the country’s fleet of spy satellites. The NRO does not disclose the purpose of its spacecraft being sent up on each launch, saying only that the flight was called the NROL-25 mission.

See also:
Rocket Launches Secret Spy Satellite for US Military
United Launch Alliance Delta IV Rocket Successfully Launches Payload for the National Reconnaissance Office
United Launch Alliance Delta IV Rocket Successfully Launches Payload for the National Reconnaissance Office
US launches new spy satellite NROL-25
Delta 4 lifts off
Spy satellite-carrying rocket blasts off
U.S. rocket carrying classified payload launches
ULA Successfully Launches Delta IV Rocket
Rocket carrying classified payload launches from California’s central coast
Rocket launch includes key parts from Utah’s ATK sites
List of NRO Launches
National Reconnaissance OfficeNational Reconnaissance Office

According to the listed launch designation, NROL-25 is a radar imaging satellite operating in a retrograde low Earth orbit.

/if I had to guess what it’s looking at, I’d guess Iran

Hackers With A Death Wish

It’s probably not a good idea to taunt the folks who tracked down Osama bin Laden and specialize in covert, extrajudicial killings.

CIA Web site hacked; group LulzSec takes credit

The hacker group LulzSec claimed credit Wednesday for taking down the CIA’s Web site for a couple of hours, the latest in a string of embarrassing Web site disruptions the group has pulled off — apparently more to poke fun and highlight vulnerabilities than to cause real damage.

At 5:48 p.m., LulzSec, which dubs itself “the world’s leaders in high-quality entertainment at your expense,” posted an alert on Twitter: “Tango down — cia.gov — for the lulz.”

The site was back up by 8 p.m.

See also:
Hacker Group Goes After CIA SiteLulzSec’s CIA hack just one of many high-profile hackings
LulzSec Speeds Up Cyber Attacks, Now Claims CIA Website Hack
Hackers say they hit CIA website
Hackers Claim CIA Website Breach
Hackers breach into CIA website
LulzSec claims responsibility for CIA.gov outage
Hackers claim hit on CIA website
Group claims to have hacked CIA website
Senate website, CIA.gov reportedly hacked. LulzSec claims responsibility. [Updated]
Lulzsec Claims Responsibility For Hacking CIA And Senate Websites
CIA website hacked; group claims ‘credit’
Central Intelligence Agency

Apparently, LulzSec stages these attacks for giggles, laughs, and bragging rights, which is all fun and games until they bite off more than they can chew by hitting an entity with unlimited resources and more hacking talent than they have, and then suddenly it won’t be so funny anymore. Maybe LulzSec already has and they just don’t know it yet.

/as Jim Croce warned, you don’t tug on Superman’s cape, you don’t spit into the wind . . .

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