Minnesota, We Have Shutdown

Gee, the Republican legislature, swept into power for the first time in forty years to reduce the size of government, has already passed the largest budget in Minnesota state history.

But petulant Mr. Wouldn’t Even Be Governor but for Tom Horner is obsessed with raising taxes to spend even more, so here we are.

No Talks Expected Before Tuesday for Minnesota Shutdown

Minnesota lawmakers are back in their districts. Some are facing voters for the first time since the government shutdown. That reception may go a long way in determining how long the shutdown will last.

. . .

Reporter: “Do you feel like you went back on a campaign promise of some kind to not shut down government?”

Dayton: “Unfortunately, the two parts of that promise came into conflict with each other because I felt it was ultimately more important to raise the revenue necessary to meet a fair, middle compromise position”

Dayton says a deal fell apart when republicans sought agreement on social policies like abortion.

Kurt Zellers – (R) Minnesota: “To say that this blew up over policy…again, to Amy ‘s point this isn’t true.”

House speaker Kurt Zellers and senate majority leader Amy Koch say the breakdown came over tax increases. They offered non-tax revenue to meet the governor’s demands–and deny they wanted a shutdown.

See also:
Minnesota government shuts down over budget impasse
Minnesota government shuts down over budget woes
Minnesota government shuts down after tax plan torpedoes budget
Minnesota government shutdown puts Tim Pawlenty in spotlight
Minnesota Dem gov fights GOP’s ‘no new tax’ stance
Minnesotans frustrated, angry over state government shutdown
Minnesotans feel pinch of government shutdowns
Minnesota budget row shuts public services
In Minnesota Shutdown, Wider Budget Conflict Comes to a Head
Minnesota shutdown: The shape of things to come?
Lori Sturdevant: Scorched earth politics
Shutdown not seen harming Minnesota’s reputation
Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

Despite the shutdown, life in Minnesota goes on, most people don’t even notice, and every day the shutdown continues the State saves money.

/so hang in there Republicans, this is why you were swept into power, to reduce the size of state government and hold the line on taxes, keep the shutdown going as long as it takes until Dayton caves on his tax raising obsession


And The Loser Is . . . The American People

The last Democrat Senator has literally been bribed and his vote bought and paid for. Harry Reid has the 60 votes he needs to screw the American people who, by the way, are rapidly souring on this travesty.

Nelson Accused of Selling Vote on Health Bill for Nebraska Pay-Off

What started as Sen. Ben Nelson’s personal stand against covering abortion with taxpayer money translated, somehow, into millions of dollars in federal aid for his home state.

The Nebraska Democrat, following weeks of negotiations with his caucus, finally agreed to back the Senate’s health care reform bill this weekend after Democratic leaders made a series of concessions. Nelson’s support gives Democrats the 60 votes they need to overcome a filibuster, barring any last-minute defections.

But critics by Sunday were heavily questioning Nelson’s motivations, given that the abortion restrictions he sought and won did not satisfy several major anti-abortion lawmakers and groups and that it took a major federal payoff to his state to seal the deal.

Critics were calling it the “cornhusker kickback” and the “Nebraska windfall,” lobbing accusations of political deal-making at Nelson.

“It’s pretty obvious votes have been bought,” Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., said.

And if anyone tries to tell you that passing this monstrosity is budget neutral, will lower health care costs, will save money, won’t add to the national debt, or will “bend the cost curve” down, well, they’re just flat out lying.

CBO: Real 10-Year Cost of Senate Bill Still $2.5 Trillion

The Congressional Budget Office’s score is in for the final Senate health bill, and it’s amazing how little Americans would get for so much.

The Democrats are irresponsibly and disingenuously claiming that the bill would cost $871 billion over 10 years. But that’s not what the CBO says. Rather, the CBO says that $871 billion would be the costs from 2010 to 2019 for expansions in insurance coverage alone. But less than 2 percent of those “10-year costs” would kick in before the fifth year of that span. In its real first 10 years (2014 to 2023), the CBO says that the bill would cost $1.8 trillion — for insurance coverage expansions alone. Other parts of the bill would cost approximately $700 billion more, bringing the bill’s full 10-year tab to approximately $2.5 trillion — according to the CBO.

In those real first 10 years (2014 to 2023), Americans would have to pay over $1 trillion in additional taxes, over $1 trillion would be siphoned out of Medicare (over $200 billion out of Medicare Advantage alone) and spent on Obamacare, and deficits would rise by over $200 billion. They would rise, that is, unless Congress follows through on the bill’s pledge to cut doctors’ payments under Medicare by 21 percent next year and never raise them back up — which would reduce doctors’ enthusiasm for seeing Medicare patients dramatically.

And what would Americans get in return for this staggering sum? Well, the CBO says that health care premiums would rise, and the Chief Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says that the percentage of the Gross Domestic Product spent on health care would rise from 17 percent today to 21 percent by the end of 2019. Nationwide health care costs would be $234 billion higher than under current law. How’s that for “reform”?

See also:
H. R. 3590 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Manager’s Amendment
Nelson vote triggers firestorm
An Unholy Compromise
House Dems cool to Nelson compromise
Senate Democrats seek to seal health care overhaul
McCain: GOP can’t stop health care

So, barring a miracle, there’s not much left at this point that can stop this deficit busting citizen suppository from becoming law. Bend over American taxpayer and get ready to pay more to wait longer for less health care. Remember, for Democrats, this isn’t even about health care reform, it’s about expanding the size and scope of the Federal government and making more Americans dependent on it. Because a dependent voter is a Democrat voter.

/beginning in 2010, get ready to clean House and start to repeal the socialist bull[expletive deleted]

And In The Senate Corner . . . Weighing In At 2074 Pages . . . The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

From behind the closed doors of Harry Reid’s office, submitted for your perusal . . .

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Put on your hip waders, this jabberwocky assault on American health care is longer than the first four Harry Potter books combined, only without the magic or entertainment value.

Senate Health Bill Is Outlined by Reid

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid outlined for Democrats Wednesday a ten-year $849 billion bill that would overhaul the nation’s health-care system and extend insurance to 31 million Americans without coverage.

The legislation represents the Nevada Democrat’s first attempt to build consensus among Senate Democratic liberals and centrists, as well as the two independents allied with the party.

A senior Senate Democratic leadership aide said the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated the bill, after it is implemented, would ensure that 94% of those living in the U.S., not counting unauthorized immigrants, have insurance coverage. CBO has previously estimated that about 83% of Americans now have insurance.

The aide said the CBO estimated that the Senate measure would reduce the federal budget deficit by $127 billion over the next decade, and by $650 billion over the second ten years of the program. In part, the bill achieves that reduction through new taxes on Medicare and high-value insurance plans.

The 10-year price tag comes in below the $900 billion limit set by the White House and below the $1.055 trillion cost of the health-overhaul passed by the House earlier this month.

The $849 billion figure and the prospect of deficit reduction cheered Democrats. But the figures aren’t likely to win over Republicans, who say the bill adds costly new benefits for some Americans when the federal budget deficit is reaching new heights.

“We’re going to do everything we can to defeat this monstrosity,” said Sen. John Thune (R., S.D.).

Among other things, the Senate legislation would create a new government-run health insurance plan to compete with private insurers, while allowing states the option not to participate. That is a nod to centrists worried about the federal government’s growing footprint in the private sector.

The bill would also create government subsidies to help individuals and families comply with a mandate to buy insurance, and would sharply expand Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor.

Mr. Reid’s decision to unveil a bill sets the stage for a pivotal vote, perhaps Friday or Saturday, that will determine whether the Senate can formally open debate on the bill. Mr. Reid, who met Wednesday with Vice President Joseph Biden, has voiced optimism that he can secure the votes needed to overcome Republican opposition and move to the debate. But with the outcome uncertain, the coming vote looms large as the first of several over the next month that will test Mr. Reid’s ability to hold together liberals and centrists.

See also:
Senate Democrats introduce $849 billion healthcare reform bill
Reid Unveils Senate Healthcare Bill
Senate Democrats’ Health Care Bill Will Cost $849 Billion
Senate’s health care bill cost: $849 billion
Senate health bottom line: $849 billion overhaul
Senate healthcare bill hits Obama cost target
Reid bill would cost $849B, expand coverage to 31 million people, aide says
Senate Health Plan Seeks to Add Coverage to 31 Million
$849 billion health bill sets up historic debate
Johnson, Thune On Senate Health Care Reform
New Senate Healthcare Reform Bill Features Public Option With Opt-Out
US Senate health plan includes public option-senator
Senate Health Care Bill: $370+ Billion Tax Hike
2,074-page health bill includes surgery, payroll tax hike
Stupak Abortion Measure Stopped…for the Moment
Senate Democrats backing down on tough anti-abortion measure
Senator: Pro-Life Side Lacks Votes to Stop Abortion Funding in Health Care
Stupak: I have votes to defeat health bill
DeGette says Stupak won’t have the votes to keep his amendment
Senate, House Democratic health bills compared
In The House Corner . . . Weighing In At 1990 Pages . . . The Affordable Health Care For America Act

/here we go, pass the popcorn

John Boehner Was Right, The Democrats Were Lying About Abortion

Remember Saturday’s all day spectacle where Pelosi finally sneaked through the House health care bill in the dead of night only by allowing the Stupak-Pitts Amendment to be voted on, which banned federal funding for abortions and gave Pelosi just enough votes to pass the overall health care bill on a squeaker 220-215 vote?

Well, guess what? That bit of Kabuki theater was only so much lip service on Pelosi’s part, now that they’ve rammed the Affordable Health Care for America Act through by conning the pro-life Democrats into voting for it, Pelosi and the rest of the pro-abortion crowd have every intention of stripping out the Stupak-Pitts language during the House-Senate conference committee. In other words, they lied to their fellow Democrats.

Waxman Says ‘No Guarantee’ Amendment Prohibiting Abortion Funding Will Be Retained in Final Version of Health Care Bill

House Energy and Commerce Chairman Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) says there is “no guarantee” that an amendment approved by the House on Saturday that prohibits federal funding of abortion in the health care bill will be retained in the final version of the bill. The bill must still go through a House-Senate conference committee and could be stripped out there.

House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) said during floor debate on the bill Saturday that he doubts the amendment will survive the conference committee.

The amendment in question was sponsored by Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.). It was approved by a vote of 240 to 194 shortly before the House voted 220 to 215 late Saturday to approve the full health care bill. Sixty-four Democrats voted for Stupak’s amendment. Both Waxman and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D.-Calif.) voted against it.

The amendment would prohibit federal funds from paying for any part of any health insurance plan that covers abortion. Stupak told CNSNews.com in a video interview posted on Oct. 23 that he had organized a group of about 40 Democrats who would vote to kill the health-care bill if Speaker Pelosi did not allow a straight up-or-down vote on his amendment when the health bill came to the House floor.

Pelosi finally consented to this request and instructed the House Rules Committee to approve a vote on Stupak’s amendment in the wee hours of Saturday morning—the same day the bill came up for a vote.

During debate on the bill on the House floor Saturday afternoon, House Minority Leader John Boehner (R.-Ohio) said he believed the Democratic leadership had relented and allowed a vote on Stupak’s amendment only because they needed more votes to pass the bill itself. Boehner said he doubted the amendment would be included in the final version of the bill that emerges from a House-Senate conference committee.

“The only reason this amendment is allowed to be offered is in order to secure enough votes to try to move this bill through the floor today,” said Boehner. “And I have my doubts about whether this language if it passes has any chance of ever being in the final version of this bill.”

Senior Democrat is ‘confident’ that Stupak amendment will be stripped

A House Democratic leader said Monday she’s “confident” controversial language on abortion will be stripped from a final healthcare bill.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), the Democrats’ chief deputy whip in the House, said that she and other pro-abortion rights lawmakers would work to strip the amendment included in the House health bill that bars federal funding from subsidizing abortions.

“I am confident that when it comes back from the conference committee that that language won’t be there,” Wasserman Schultz said during an appearance on MSNBC. “And I think we’re all going to be working very hard, particularly the pro-choice members, to make sure that’s the case.”

The amendment, offered by Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), won the support of Republicans and dozens of centrist Democrats in the House, but revealed a deep divide in the Democratic caucus over abortion.

Sixty-four Democrats voted for Stupak’s amendment, without which the House healthcare bill would not have won final passage in a 220-215 vote.

See also:
Stupak-Pitts Pro-life amendment vote today on House floor
The Man Who Made Pelosi Cry ‘Uncle’
Abortion Rights Activists Say Stupak-Pitts Amendment Would Hurt Women’s Rights
“Do we live in a theocracy?”: Pro-Abortion Reaction to Stupak Amendment is Fierce
ACLJ Applauds Passage of Pro-Life Stupak/Pitts Amendment – Only Bright Spot in Flawed Health Care Bill in U.S. House
House Healthcare Bill’s Abortion Provisions Anger All Sides
Health care bill dead on arrival in the Senate?

So, assuming that this Democrat dream of unaffordable socialized medicine ever makes it through the Senate, which I have serious doubts about, it’ll be interesting to see if the Stupak-Pitts language does indeed get stripped out of the final conference committee version of the bill.

/and if it does get stripped out of the final bill, will the pro-life Democrats in the House stand up for their principles and vote against it?

Like A Thief In The Night

In the dead of night, after making promises she has no intention of keeping concerning abortion funding, Pelosi finally broke enough arms and legs. Barely.

House Democrats pass health-care bill

Hours after President Obama exhorted Democratic lawmakers to “answer the call of history,” the House hit an unprecedented milestone on the path to health-care reform, approving a trillion-dollar package late Saturday that seeks to overhaul private insurance practices and guarantee comprehensive and affordable coverage to almost every American.

After months of acrimonious partisanship, Democrats closed ranks on a 220-215 vote that included 39 defections, mostly from the party’s conservative ranks. But the bill attracted a surprise Republican convert: Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao of Louisiana, who represents the Democratic-leaning district of New Orleans and had been the target of a last-minute White House lobbying campaign. GOP House leaders had predicted their members would unanimously oppose the bill.

Democrats have sought for decades to provide universal health care, but not since the 1965 passage of Medicare and Medicaid has a chamber of Congress approved such a vast expansion of coverage. Action now shifts to the Senate, which could spend the rest of the year debating its version of the health-care overhaul. Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) hopes to bring a measure to the floor before Thanksgiving, but legislation may not reach Obama’s desk before the new year.

At the Capitol, Obama urged the few Democrats who were still wavering on Saturday afternoon to put aside their political fears and embrace the bill’s ambitious objectives. “Opportunities like this come around maybe once in a generation,” he said afterward. “This is our moment to live up to the trust that the American people have placed in us. Even when it’s hard. Especially when it’s hard. This is our moment to deliver.”

The House legislation would for the first time require every individual to obtain insurance, and would require all but the smallest employers to provide coverage to their workers. It would vastly expand Medicaid and create a new marketplace where people could obtain federal subsidies to buy insurance from private companies or from a new government-run insurance plan.

Though some people would receive no benefits — including about 6 million illegal immigrants, according to congressional estimates — the bill would virtually close the coverage gap for people who do not have access to health-care coverage through their jobs.

“For generations, the American people have called for affordable, quality health care for their families,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said before the vote. “Today, the call will be answered.”

The debate on the House floor extended for about 12 hours and settled into a civil, if predictable, pattern, after a heated start.

Republicans had blasted the 1,990-page bill as an ominous blueprint for a budget-busting government takeover of the private health-care system that would impose unprecedented mandates on individuals and employers, raise an array of taxes and slash projected spending on Medicare, the federal health program for the elderly. At a time of record budget deficits, Republicans argued that the country could ill-afford a new entitlement program that would cost an estimated $1.05 trillion over the next decade.

“Big government doesn’t mean better health care,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Tex.). “This is not the reform families need. This is all about taking a giant first step toward a single-payer national health-care system. Washington will ultimately decide what doctors you can see, what treatments you deserve . . . and, when you’re sick, will you be worth their cost?”

Throughout the debate, Republican after Republican warned that the legislation would rob Americans of their right to make choices about their health care, cost the nation jobs and unfairly financially burden future generations.

Pelosi needed to corral at least 218 of 258 Democrats to push the bill across the finish line. That task appeared to grow easier after party leaders broke a weeks-long impasse over abortion by agreeing to hold a vote on an amendment — offered by antiabortion Democrats — that would explicitly bar the public plan from` covering the procedure. The amendment, approved 240 to 194, with 64 Democrats in favor, also would prohibit people who received insurance subsidies from purchasing private plans that covered abortion.

The deal cleared the way for dozens of antiabortion Democrats to back the package. The most passionate advocates of abortion rights were not happy, but few were prepared to vote down legislation that promises to achieve so many long-held party goals.

See also:
President Obama’s statement on House passage of the health care reform bill
House narrowly passes landmark health care bill
Democrats claim big victory on health care
House passes health care reform bill; Vote garners only one Republican
House Passes Healthcare Reform
Abortion Was at Heart of Wrangling
What did Cao get?
In The House Corner . . . Weighing In At 1990 Pages . . . The Affordable Health Care For America Act

Bend over, you’re paying for it.

/fortunately for us taxpayers, the House vote was the easy part for Democrats, they still need to pass this bull[expletive deleted] through the Senate and a conference committee