Fifty Years Ago Today

The war turned cold.

Berlin marks 50th Wall anniversary with minute of silence

Berlin on Saturday marked the 50th anniversary of the day the Berlin Wall started to go up with a memorial service and a minute of silence in memory of those who died trying to flee to the West.

German President Christian Wulff, Chancellor Angela Merkel, who grew up in the East, and Berlin mayor Klaus Wowereit attended a nationally televised commemoration followed by a ecumenical church service at a chapel built where the Wall stood for 28 years.

See also:
Germany marks 50 years since building of the Berlin Wall
Berlin marks 50th Wall anniversary with minute of silence
Berlin Marks 50th Anniversary of ‘The Wall’
Berlin Wall marks 50th anniversary
Berlin Marks 50th Anniversary of ‘The Wall’
Germany marks 50th anniversary of Berlin Wall
Minute of silence for Berlin Wall anniversary
50th anniversary of Berlin Wall remembered in Germany – pictures
Berlin Wall ‘history, but not forgotten’
‘I’m glad I was wrong about the Berlin Wall’
Berlin Wall, 1961-1989, R.I.P
Berlin Wall at 50: Five Iconic Moments
German left provokes row on Berlin Wall anniversary

The Berlin Wall was a human tragedy for almost thirty years, separating families and dividing a country. What were the Communists thinking?

/normally walls are built to keep people out, when you build a wall to keep people in, it’s called a prison

All Great Wars Must Come To An End

No one can accuse Germany of not finishing the wars they start.

Germany Closes Book on World War I With Final Reparations Payment

Germany will make its last reparations payment for World War I on Oct. 3, settling its outstanding debt from the 1919 Versailles Treaty and quietly closing the final chapter of the conflict that shaped the 20th century.

Oct. 3, the 20th anniversary of German unification, will also mark the completion of the final chapter of World War I with the end of reparations payments 92 years after the country’s defeat.

The German government will pay the last instalment of interest on foreign bonds it issued in 1924 and 1930 to raise cash to fulfil the enormous reparations demands the victorious Allies made after World War I.

The reparations bankrupted Germany in the 1920s and the fledgling Nazi party seized on the resulting public resentment against the terms of the Versailles Treaty.

The sum was initially set at 269 billion gold marks, around 96,000 tons of gold, before being reduced to 112 billion gold marks by 1929, payable over a period of 59 years.

Germany suspended annual payments in 1931 during the global financial crisis and Adolf Hitler unsurprisingly declined to resume them when he came to power in 1933.

But in 1953, West Germany agreed at an international conference in London to service its international bond obligations from before World War II. In the years that followed it repaid the principal on the bonds, which had been issued to private and institutional investors in countries including the United States.

Under the terms of the London accord, Germany was allowed to wait until it unified before paying some €125 million in outstanding interest that had accrued on its foreign debt in the years 1945 to 1952. After the Berlin Wall fell and West and East Germany united in 1990, the country dutifully paid that interest off in annual instalments, the last of which comes due on Oct. 3.

See also:
Germany to pay off its WWI reparations debt Oct. 3
Germany finishes paying WWI reparations, ending century of ‘guilt’
Germany finishes paying WWI reparations, ending century of ‘guilt’
‘Germany makes final payment for WWI reparations’
Germany to settle last World War One debt
Germany pays off WWI debt
Germany set to pay off last WW1 reparations
Germany to finally clear WW-I reparations
Why has Germany taken so long to pay off its WWI debt?
World War I reparations

It’s king of ironic that Germany, the loser of two world wars, can afford to pay off it’s 100 year old debt in full, while the United States, the winner of those two world wars, continues to dig a bottomless debt hole that we may never be able to climb out of.

/think maybe Germany can spare $14 trillion?