Classless Warrior Without A Clue

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few years, you know that the U.S. economy isn’t in good shape. Some doomsayers are even predicting that we’re headed for or already in another recession. What’s the proper tax policy when dealing with a fragile economy? Let’s see what Obama had to say on the subject two years ago.

That’s right, the last thing you want to do is raise taxes in a recessionary environment, because it would suck demand out of the economy and put businesses further in a hole. So, what did cynical Captain Clueless announce today?

Obama proposes new taxes on wealthy for half of debt plan

President Obama made a defiant call on Monday for $1.5 trillion in new taxes as part of a plan to find $3.2 trillion in budget savings over the next decade, issuing his most detailed proposal yet to tame the soaring federal debt.

Abandoning earlier compromises, Obama adopted a posture that cedes far less ground in cutting the nation’s social safety net and demands much more in terms of new levies on millionaires, other wealthy Americans and some industries.

See also:
Obama says raise taxes for the rich to help cut huge deficits; GOP says that’s class warfare
Boehner on Obama deficit plans: Tells Fox Business, “I don’t think I would describe class warfare as leadership”
Old debate over raising rich’s taxes plays out on new landscape
Tax the rich, Obama says; class warfare, says GOP
Analysis: Deficit plan not class warfare, Obama insists
Obama: “This is not class warfare — It’s math”
Obama campaign takes on ‘class warfare’
Obama Yokes Benefit Cuts to New Taxes
Obama links entitlement cuts to tax changes
Obama proposes tax hike on wealthy to close deficit
Higher taxes for the mega-rich
Obama’s deficit proposal marks a move away from compromise

What a brilliant idea, let’s tax the [expletive deleted] out of the rich, you know, the same people who spend and invest money and create the jobs that we need to grow the economy out of the hole we’re in now. Of course, Obama knows damn well that his proposed tax increases will never pass through Congress. Even most Democrats aren’t stupid enough to vote to raise taxes in the face of a weak economy.

But Obama still proposed the tax increases anyway, even though he knows they’ll never see the light of day, why? Because it’s a cynical political ploy to shore up his lefty base in a futile attempt to salvage his ever decreasing chances of winning reelection. When Obama says it’s not about class warfare, you can be damn sure it’s all about class warfare. Hey Obama, you want everybody to pay their “fair share”, how about the 50% of Americans that don’t pay any taxes at all?

Obama doesn’t give a [expletive deleted] about the economy and whether his words and actions make a recovery harder to achieve. The only “job” he cares about is his own. He’s basically abdicated from the last 14 months of his first term as President to campaign full time for a second term, the rest of the country be damned.

Obama is like a $4 trillion ton drag, jumping up and down on the back of the economy. I can guarantee you that the second it’s a done deal that Obama’s on his way out, the country will breathe a huge, collective sigh of relief and the economy will take off like gangbusters again.

/until the elections, I think it’s best that we just ignore Obama and practice a policy of fiscal and regulatory containment

Budget Hero 2.0

Find out how hard it really is to get us out of the economic mess we’re in. Do you have a better fiscal plan than Paul Ryan’s road map, can you destroy the country as quickly as Obama’s reckless spending spree?

Computer game gives people shot at managing budget

Think you might do better than President Barack Obama and congressional leaders in picking and choosing what government spending to cut — or taxes to raise — to stave off a debt showdown that could wreck the economy? A new computer game gives you, too, the chance to play “Budget Hero.”

“Budget Hero 2.0” is an update of an original version that came out in 2008. It shows players just how difficult it might be to carry out their grand policy objectives — universal health care, extending the Bush tax cuts or ending foreign aid — and still keep the government from either becoming irrelevant, or going broke.

“Our timing turns out to be perfect,” said former Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif., who resigned this year to head the Woodrow Wilson Center, a nonpartisan think tank that developed the game with American Public Media.

Play the game:

Budget Hero 2.0

See also:
Budget Hero 2.0: Fun with debt ceilings!
Get Ready To Get Your Game On And Save The Country! (Civic Duty Meets Casual Gaming)
Computer Game Lets You Be a ‘Budget Hero’
Computer game gives people shot at managing budget
New Game Allows Users to Take a Crack at the Debt Ceiling
Computer game offers a chance to solve fiscal crisis
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
American Public Media
American Public Media

Okay, okay, so the game was developed by Lefties, as disclosed above. It’s still somewhat amusing, factual, and pertinent to our current predicament.

/give it a whirl, be a Budget Hero

Crazy Dayton Caves

Gee, apparently we can live within our means without raising taxes after all. The stupid part is that Governor Lunatic accepted the GOP proposal that they submitted before the shutdown even started. What a waste of two weeks. At least now, maybe Minnesotans will soon be able to legally fish and buy beer again.

Dayton Agrees to Republican Budget to End Minnesota Shutdown

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican leaders went behind closed doors at 2 p.m. Thursday to discuss a budget proposal with additional conditions that could end the state government shutdown. The trio emerged shortly after 5 p.m. to announce a “framework agreement” has been reached.

The meeting began after the governor sent a letter Thursday morning to House Speaker Kurt Zellers and Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, saying he “reluctantly” agrees to accept the Republican budget proposal from June 30 if it will end the government shutdown.

See also:
Minnesota shutdown to end soon
Minnesota Government To Re-open As Gov. Dayton Caves On Tax Increases
Minnesota Gov. Ready to End Shutdown
Urgent: Dayton to accept last GOP budget offer
Budget Deal to End Minnesota Government Shutdown
Deal In Place To End Minnesota Shutdown
Minnesota government shutdown nears an end, but at what cost?
Minnesota budget deal pushes problem down the road
Doh! Minnesota shutdown could claim beer next
Minnesota shutdown puts MillerCoors beer sales in doubt
No free pass during shutdown; anglers must be licensed
DNR: No Honor System Fishing during Minnesota Shutdown
Some questions — and answers — about Minnesota budget deal and what happens next

Of course, the Republicans didn’t get everything they wanted and they still ended up spending more than their budget limit. But what are you going to do when the Governor, who has mental health issues, is willing to shut down the entire state to satisfy his obsession with raising taxes? And we still have to deal with Crazy Dayton for another 2 1/2 years, lucky us.

Anyway, now that this unfortunate episode is almost behind us, we can move on to more important things, like getting a new Vikings stadium approved. And I swear, If Dayton gets in the way of a new stadium and we end up losing professional football in Minnesota . . . well, he’d better have a real good hiding place.

/and remember, in the land of what might have been, if it weren’t for asshole spoiler little Tom Horner, we would have had a Republican governor to go along with the Republican legislature and Minnesota’s fiscal house would already be in order, without all of Dayton’s drama queen bull[expletive deleted]

Minnesota, We Have Shutdown

Gee, the Republican legislature, swept into power for the first time in forty years to reduce the size of government, has already passed the largest budget in Minnesota state history.

But petulant Mr. Wouldn’t Even Be Governor but for Tom Horner is obsessed with raising taxes to spend even more, so here we are.

No Talks Expected Before Tuesday for Minnesota Shutdown

Minnesota lawmakers are back in their districts. Some are facing voters for the first time since the government shutdown. That reception may go a long way in determining how long the shutdown will last.

. . .

Reporter: “Do you feel like you went back on a campaign promise of some kind to not shut down government?”

Dayton: “Unfortunately, the two parts of that promise came into conflict with each other because I felt it was ultimately more important to raise the revenue necessary to meet a fair, middle compromise position”

Dayton says a deal fell apart when republicans sought agreement on social policies like abortion.

Kurt Zellers – (R) Minnesota: “To say that this blew up over policy…again, to Amy ‘s point this isn’t true.”

House speaker Kurt Zellers and senate majority leader Amy Koch say the breakdown came over tax increases. They offered non-tax revenue to meet the governor’s demands–and deny they wanted a shutdown.

See also:
Minnesota government shuts down over budget impasse
Minnesota government shuts down over budget woes
Minnesota government shuts down after tax plan torpedoes budget
Minnesota government shutdown puts Tim Pawlenty in spotlight
Minnesota Dem gov fights GOP’s ‘no new tax’ stance
Minnesotans frustrated, angry over state government shutdown
Minnesotans feel pinch of government shutdowns
Minnesota budget row shuts public services
In Minnesota Shutdown, Wider Budget Conflict Comes to a Head
Minnesota shutdown: The shape of things to come?
Lori Sturdevant: Scorched earth politics
Shutdown not seen harming Minnesota’s reputation
Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

Despite the shutdown, life in Minnesota goes on, most people don’t even notice, and every day the shutdown continues the State saves money.

/so hang in there Republicans, this is why you were swept into power, to reduce the size of state government and hold the line on taxes, keep the shutdown going as long as it takes until Dayton caves on his tax raising obsession

Get With The Program

Cut, cap, balance. Get used to hearing those three words, because they’re going to be the “drill baby drill” mantra of the 2012 election cycle. It’s a winning issue and our country’s fiscal survival depends on it.

Cut, cap and balance

This week a group of serious, committed advocacy organizations banded together to send a clear message to Washington and urged members of Congress to sign their pledge, titled “Cut, Cap and Balance.”

. . .

So what are the right things to do, according to the pledge?

Cut — Substantial cuts in spending that will reduce the deficit next year and thereafter.

Cap — Enforceable spending caps that will put federal spending on a path to a balanced budget.

Balance — Passage of a balanced-budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution — but only if it includes both a spending limitation and a supermajority for raising taxes, in addition to balancing revenues and expenses.

Take the pledge:

Cut Cap Balance Pledge

See also:
The Fiscal Pledge We Need: Cut, Cap, Balance
Conservative Lawmakers Sign Pledge Demanding Cuts, Caps & Balanced Budget Amendment in Debt Limit Deal
Coalition Calls for ‘Cut, Cap, And Balance’ on Capitol Hill
Conservative groups, lawmakers officially roll out Cut, Cap, Balance Pledge
Lawmakers sign pledge to balance the budget
Cut, cap, balance to save economy
CBO Warning Bolsters ‘Cut, Cap and Balance’
Cut, Cap and Balance–As in the Budget–Full-Speed Ahead
Cut, Cap, Balance: How to Address the Debt Ceiling Issue
Behind the GOP’s ‘Cut, Cap, Balance’ Pledge
Can Conservatives’ ‘Cut, Cap and Balance Pledge’ Cure Spending Problem?

Go to the pledge website, work your e-mail, work your phone. Do whatever you can to get your Congressional representatives to sign on to the Cut, Cap, and Balance Pledge. Just do it, do it now.

/and if they won’t sign on, make sure you do your part to vote them out of office

Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

The Republicans have already passed a budget, but Governor Dayton won’t sign on to the deal unless it includes tax increases, a demand Republicans will not accept. Who will blink first?

State shutdown would be a leap into unknown

In 19 days, Minnesotans could endure the most wide-reaching government shutdown in state history, with little sense of when it might end.

Across the vast enterprise of state government, agency heads are scrambling to come up with closure plans. State leaders have no real playbook for blinking off such an enormous government machine, so they must wade into an array of wrenching decisions and legal scuffles, knowing they risk turning Minnesota into a national spectacle of partisan gridlock.

“We the citizens will lose immeasurably,” said former Gov. Arne Carlson, adding that Minnesota could become a test case for a wave of shutdowns in politically deadlocked states. “It raises serious questions about where America is going and where Minnesota is going.”

See also:
A shutdown looms, questions linger
State layoff notices sent as questions dominate
Minn. workers warned about shutdown layoffs
Minnesota sends layoff notices to prep for shutdown
Government shutdown would mean hiring freeze
OPINION | A shutdown ain’t nothin’ but a shutdown
No good from shutdown
AFSCME Urges Minn. GOP Lawmakers to Compromise, Avoid Shutdown
New lawmakers willing to negotiate, but not on taxes or total spending
A Q & A about Minnesota budget, possible shutdown

If the Minnesota government shuts down, who will be responsible or, to put it another way, who should take the blame? To find the answer, let’s go back to the 2010 election. Minnesota voters, for the first time in four decades, overwhelmingly swept the Republicans into control of both chambers of the legislature. Mark Dayton, on the other hand, was barely elected Governor by the narrowest of margins after a close recount. The message Minnesotans sent was crystal clear, they want lower taxes and less government spending, period. Minnesota is already one of the most highly taxed states, additional taxes would only make the state less economically competitive.

/so take your tax increase fixation and shove it up your ass Governor Dayton, the people have spoken, the Republicans have passed a budget, and if the Minnesota government shuts down, it’s your [expletive deleted] fault!

Running On Empty

Actually, we’re running beyond empty now. The United States can’t legally borrow any more money until Congress acts to raise the debt ceiling.

US government hits debt ceiling, lighting 11-week fuse

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner informed Congress on Monday that the United States has reached its legal debt limit, setting off a ticking time bomb that could explode in less than three months if lawmakers can’t bridge differences and allow more government borrowing.

In hitting the $14.3 trillion debt ceiling – the limit on how much the government can borrow – the Obama administration on Monday began temporarily halting payments to the retirement and federal pension accounts of federal workers and started borrowing from those funds, to be restored later.

Geithner sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., warning that the government can move money around for about 11 weeks but if a new debt ceiling isn’t agreed to by Aug. 2, the U.S. government could effectively default on its obligations to its creditors. He warned of “catastrophic economic consequences for citizens” unless Congress raises the debt ceiling.

An increase of about $2 trillion is expected, enough to get the issue past the 2012 elections before Congress would have to lift it again.

Republicans who control the House of Representatives vow to link raising the debt ceiling to cuts in government spending of at least equal measure. In a combative statement Monday, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, upped the ante.

“As I have said numerous times, there will be no debt limit increase without serious budget reforms and significant spending cuts, cuts that are greater than any increase in the debt limit.” Boehner has called previously for $2 trillion in spending cuts as part of any deal to raise the debt ceiling.

See also:
US hits $14 trillion debt limit
US Hits Debt Ceiling, But Treasury Market Rules Out Default For Now
Deja Vu, But No Disaster: U.S. Government Hits Debt Ceiling
U.S. Hits Debt Limit, Sky Doesn’t Fall
U.S. hit debt limit today
Treasury Tapping Federal Retirement Accounts to Stave Off Default
Turbo Tim Raids Pension Plans
With Debt Limit Maxed Out, Lawmakers Hold Firm On Remedy
Rep. Jordan: U.S. won’t default if debt ceiling isn’t raised
U.S. National Debt Clock

Well, we hit the debt ceiling and, despite all the Democrat Chicken Little hysteria, the Sun didn’t explode, the seas didn’t boil, and the markets didn’t plunge thousands of points. Go figure.

/all I can say is that the Republicans had better stand firm and hold their ground this time and hold out for concrete, verifiable spending cuts that at least equal the amount of any debt limit increase