Operation Linda Nchi

Kenya is hardly the first country to invade Somalia and attempt to clean out the festering cesspool of Islamic criminals and terrorists and it probably won’t be the last. So far, every country that’s attempted to tame Somalia has come up empty. Based on what’s currently known of Operation Linda Nchi, I’m not particularly optimistic that Kenya will be any more successful than any other country has been in the past.

Kenyan Troops Advance in Somalia, Pursuing Al-Shabab

Kenyan forces have entered a second part of southern Somalia as part of operations against militant group al-Shabab.

Officials and witnesses confirmed to VOA Somali Service Tuesday that Kenyan troops, backed by helicopters, moved through the border town of El-Waq on Monday and are now in Somalia’s Gedo region.

Kenyan troops have also been seen near the al-Shabab-controlled town of Afmadow in the Jubba region. Residents are reported to be fleeing the town in fear of a battle.

. . .

The exact size of the Kenyan force in Somalia is not clear. Residents have reported seeing columns of 30 to 40 armored vehicles.

Al-Shabab is calling on all Somalis to defend against what it calls “the enemy.”

The last country to invade Somalia was Ethiopia, which deployed troops in 2006 to oust Islamist militants who had briefly taken over the capital. Al-Shabab emerged as the main group fighting the Ethiopians, who withdrew at the beginning of 2009.

See also:
Kenyan military crosses into Somali
Kenya Cabinet meeting backs military operation in Somalia
Kenya, Somalia Seal Pact to Hit Shabaab
Kenya cabinet backs military offensive into Somalia
Kenya troops ‘advance into Somalia near Afmadow’
Kenyan troops close in on Somali’s second key town
Kenyan forces hunt militants inside Somalia
Kenyan forces kill 75 Somali militants
Kenyan incursion into Somalia provokes threat from Islamic militants
Al-Shabaab threaten to take ‘flames of war’ into Kenya
Kenya’s security on alert following al-Shabaab threat
Zero tolerance to Al Shabab threat
Was Kenya right to enter Somalia?
Price that Kenya must pay to keep al-Shabaab at bay
Kenya
Kenya
Somalia
Somalia
Al-Shabaab
Al-Shabaab
Al-Shabaab

All I can say is go Kenya, good luck and happy hunting! Somalia hasn’t been subdued yet, not even by the United States, but there’s always a first time.

/oh, and while you’re in the neighborhood, could you do the world a favor and wipe out the Somali pirate safe harbors?

The Dominoes Strike Back

It’s Sunni versus Shia as Bahrain’s Suuni rulers have had just about enough of their Shia population’s ongoing uprising and have called on their fellow Sunnis, the Saudis, to help put down the Shia revolt.

Saudi Arabian troops enter Bahrain as regime asks for help to quell uprising

Saudi Arabian troops have crossed into Bahrain after the tiny Gulf kingdom’s ruling family asked for help from neighbouring Sunni Arab states to quell a two-month uprising which threatens their 200-year-old dynasty.

The Saudi capital, Riyadh, said that it had responded to a “security threat” by deploying its troops on the streets of its neighbour. They are to protect strategic sites such as bridges and government buildings. Bahrain’s rulers said the Saudi forces crossed the 16-mile causeway from Saudi Arabia to the island, together a contingent of troops from the Gulf Co-operation Council. Saudi authorities did not give details of the force; some reports estimate it to be 1,000.

Bahrain’s Shia majority has laid siege to the centre of the capital, Manama, since mid-February and has, in recent days, marched on government buildings and palaces.

See also:
GCC Troops Arrive in Bahrain
Saudis send troops into Bahrain to quell protests
Kingdom takes lead to help Bahrain
Thousands of Saudi troops cross into Bahrain after weekend of violence
Foreign troops enter Bahrain as protests continue
Gulf troops enter Bahrain as protests escalate
Saudi Arabia sends troops to troubled Bahrain
Saudi soldiers sent into Bahrain
Saudi troops enter Bahrain
Gulf military force enters Bahrain to help deal with unrest
Gulf security forces enter Bahrain, protests escalate
Next Mideast Flashpoint: Saudis Enter Bahrain
US says told, not consulted, on Saudi Bahrain force
Clinton Expresses ‘Deep Concern’ About Bahrain – US Official
U.S., U.N. urge restraint as forces enter Bahrain to control protests
Iran urges Bahrain to prevent “foreign interference”
‘Saudi intervention is a declaration of war’

Make no mistake about it, the Shia uprising in Bahrain and all the Shia unrest throughout the region is being directly instigated by Iran and her agents.

/if this turmoil somehow escalates into a direct confrontation between Iran and Saudi Arabia, hopefully the Obama/Hillary foreign policy clown posse can keep track of which side the United States’ bread is buttered on

Algeria Circling The Drain

First there was political upheaval in Pakistan, Lebanon, Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, and now Algeria is the latest Muslim country domino to teeter on the edge of open revolt.

Thousands in Streets of Algiers Demanding Change of Government

Thousands of protesters took to the streets of Algeria’s capital and other main cities demanding the government’s ouster, mirroring protests in fellow North African countries Egypt and Tunisia.

A day after pro-democracy protesters drove Egypt’s longtime leader Hosni Mubarak from power, Algerians were in the streets demanding their own President Abdelaziz Bouteflika leave office.

Protesters chanting, “No to the police state!” and “Bouteflika out!”. News reports say crowds were in the thousands but far out numbered by riot police.

Protests also took place in other cities, including the Mediterranean hub of Oran, also against government orders.

See also:
ALGERIA: Clashes, arrests reported at banned anti-government demonstration
Thousands protest in Algeria, defying government warnings; 400 arrested but ‘the fear is gone’
Thousands Defy Ban To Protest In Algeria
400 arrested in Algeria at rally demanding reforms
Thousands rally to demand Algerian leader resign
Hundreds arrested as Algeria defies protest ban
Police and protesters clash in Algeria
Algerian opposition says 5,000 people participate in demonstration
Algeria: Police And Protesters Clash
Algerian police crack down on protesters
Algeria begins crackdown on pro-democracy demos
Algerian Riot Police Break Up Protest

I’d sure like to believe that the anti-government demonstrations in all these countries, one after the other, represented a wave of Western democracy marching through the Muslim world, but color me skeptical. None of these countries has any democratic history and their populations are decidedly non-secular. Even the countries held up as models of Muslim “democracy”, such as Turkey or Indonesia, have societies heavily steeped in Islamic law, antithetical to Western values.

/one thing’s for sure, whatever becomes of these Muslim countries currently embroiled in various stages of popular rebellion, the end result, in the aggregate, is likely to be decidedly less secular and less friendly to the West

Yemen Circling The Drain

Okay, Yemen was already pretty much circling the drain. But now the Yemeni government, that was marginally helping us in the war against al Qaeda and radical Islam, is under pressure. Who knows what manner of government might come to power if the current one falls?

Massive protests erupt in Yemen to demand ouster of president

Around 15,000 protesters took to streets in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa on Thursday, calling for the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

“People want to change the regime, want the president to leave, ” protesters uproared with pink belts wrapped around their heads, which symbolized freedom, waving pink flags together in the largest public rallies organized by the opposition parties in four areas in the capital.

The protesters are mainly university students, opposition party members and supporters, as well as some workers and the unemployed, mostly of whom complained about unemployment and poverty.

“We are sending our message today to the president and his government that we demand improving living conditions, combating corruption as well as political reform. We want better future for our children,” a protester from the opposition Islamist Islah party told Xinhua.

See also:
Yemen protesters demand change of government
Now, people’s power sets off tremors in Yemen
Political Unrest Spreads as Yemeni Protesters Rally against Long-time Ruler
Thousands in Yemeni capital protest regime
Thousands of protesters urge Yemeni President Saleh to resign
Thousands march in capital in support of reforms
Thousands of Yemenis demand change in government
Sporadic Protests Continue in Egypt as Protest Movement Spreads to Yemen
Yemen protests: Thousands call on president to leave
Yemen protests: ‘People are fed up with corruption’
Canada urges Yemen to allow ‘freedom of expression’
Yemen president slams Al-Jazeera TV by phone call with Qatar Emir
US backs Yemeni right to protest

Let’s see, the pro-Western governments of Pakistan, Lebanon, Tunisia, Egypt, and now Yemen, have all been toppled or are under extreme pressure from opposition groups looking to overthrow the current regimes. And what’s Obama’s response? He’s throwing them all under the bus by encouraging the opposition protests under the guise of “freedom of expression”. Doesn’t Obama realize that the world could end up with a whole slew of new, anti-Western, Islamic governments? Wouldn’t that be fun?

/Obama is really naive and stupid or he actually approves of the possibility of a bunch of new, anti-Western, Islamic governments, either way, it’s extremely unsettling, remember, Obama didn’t lift a finger to help or utter a peep of support when the mass protests were against the Islamic regime in Iran

Egypt Circling The Drain

Here we go again. First Pakistan, then Lebanon, Tunisia, and now . . . Egypt?

Three Dead in Egypt As Protestors Demand Mubarak’s Exit

At least three people have died as tens of thousands of protestors continue to pack the streets of Cairo in what has become the biggest protest in recent Egyptian history.

Two protestors died in the city of Suez and a security officer died in downtown Cairo as protestors calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year reign clashed with police. At least 100 protestors were injured in Cairo, where police used tear gas, rubber bullets, batons and dogs to try to disperse the crowds, and Twitter has been blocked.

The Associated Press said that 10,000 people had flooded downtown Cairo, where demonstrators shouted “Down with Mubarak” and “Tunisia, Tunisia” as part of a protest called “Day of Anger” that was purposely scheduled for “National Police Day.” Earlier this month, protests in Tunisia sparked by the self-immolation of a disgruntled job seeker and spread by social media brought down the government of President Ben Ali.

In Egypt, the protest remained nonviolent for most of the day with marches in the square and around the capital. However, by late afternoon a large group began to move towards the Ministry of the Interior, home of the police force, and security forces responded by using rubber bullets, tear gas and water hoses.

See also:
Rioters Jolt Egyptian Regime
Egypt: Protest Against ‘Repressive’ Mubarak
Protestors shake Egypt’s streets
Egypt Protests Leave 3 Dead; Cairo Rally Broken Up
Egypt Police Disperse Anti-Mubarak Protesters
A dam breaking in Egypt
Egypt protesters report live bullets used
Egypt: President’s son and family ‘have fled to the UK’
Update: Egypt protests
U.S. urges restraint in Egypt, says government stable
White House keeps eye on Middle East protests
Twitter blocked in Egypt as thousands of protesters call for government reform [Updated]
Twitter blocked in Egypt after political unrest
Twitter confirms it is blocked in Egypt

Boy oh boy, you can bet the ranch that the Muslim Brotherhood are just salivating at the prospect of toppling the Mubarak government. Another Western domino would surely fall under the control of radical Islamists and it would be arguably the largest domino in the region. These developments do not bode well at all for U.S. and, especially, Israeli interests. And I don’t think these protests are going to stop either, the masses have a real taste for it now.

/is Obama just going to sit back and watch as the Middle East burns to the ground?