Islam Takes Tunisia

This is the first election held in one of the countries that have undergone “Arab Spring” uprisings. And predictably, probably foreshadowing the outcome in upcoming elections in other “Arab Spring” countries, secularism took a beating and a backseat to the Islamists.

Secular party concedes defeat in landmark Tunisian election

Tunisia’s leading secularist party conceded defeat on Monday after unofficial tallies from the country’s first free election showed a victory for an Islamist party.

The election came 10 months from from the moment street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in a protest that started the Arab Spring uprisings.

More than 90 percent of the 4.1 million registered voters cast ballots, officials said.

See also:
Tunisian Islamist party claims election victory, set to dominate writing of new constitution
Tunisian Islamists to gain huge victory in first elections of the Arab Spring
Tunisia’s Islamists claim election victory
Tunisia’s Islamist party claims election victory
Islamists set for power after strong vote for Muslim parties in Tunisia’s first democratic elections since revolution
Early sign in Tunisia of strong Islamist vote
Tunisia elections: An-Nahda party on course to win
Moderate Islamists lead in early counting of Tunisian votes
Islamists claim win in Tunisia’s Arab Spring vote
Islamist Party Takes Half Of Overseas Seats In Tunisia
Tunisian liberal party dismayed at poor elections show
As Tunisia Counts its Votes, Can the West Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Islamists?

Could these Tunisian elections be the first stepping stone toward a wider, regional Islamic Caliphate?

/stay tuned, Egypt has elections coming up and if the Islamists win there . . .

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Egypt Votes, But For What Exactly?

Egypt had a free and fair vote to amend the Egyptian constitution, that’s a good thing, right? Not so fast.

Egypt Approves Amendments

Egyptians voted in overwhelming numbers to approve a set of constitutional amendments, setting the stage for Egypt’s first truly contested parliamentary and presidential elections in decades.

Saturday’s historic referendum on the amendments saw millions of enthusiastic Egyptians wait patiently for hours to cast ballots in what for almost everyone was a novelty—a vote in which the result wasn’t effectively predetermined.

The largely peaceful and fraud-free vote was a marked contrast to past elections and a glimpse of how much has changed in Egypt in the weeks since President Hosni Mubarak stepped down amid widespread unrest, ending decades of single-party, autocratic rule.

Yet Saturday’s referendum also offered early clues into the rifts likely to shape Egyptian politics in the coming months and years. Many of the largely secular liberals who led the revolution that ousted Mr. Mubarak were opposed to the amendments, strongly suggesting the protest leaders have fallen out of sync with the vast majority of Egyptians.

Protest leaders criticized the amendments as part of a rushed and problematic timeline for establishing democracy; approving the changes started the clock on a race they said they are unprepared to run because they are still setting up parties.

Almost alone among the political groups in support of the amendments were the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist group outlawed under Mr. Mubarak, and the National Democratic Party, the former president’s ruling party. Both hope to capitalize on their already strong organizations in summer elections for parliament, which will then be charged with writing an entirely new constitution.
. . .

Journalists covering the announcement abandoned any pretenses of objectivity and yelled “Allahu Akbar!”—”God is Great!”—when the tallies were read out by officials.

See also:
How Egypt’s historic referendum could now bolster Islamists
Big majority vote for constitutional changes in Egypt
Egypt Backs Constitutional Changes That May Aid Brotherhood, Mubarak Party
Egypt: Constitution changes pass in referendum
Egyptians approve constitutional amendments in referendum
Egyptians overwhelmingly approve constitutional changes
Egyptians set for summer elections
Egyptian voters say ‘yes’ to speedy elections
Egypt’s Historic Referendum: Rushed But Moving
Egypt referendum results: 77.2 per cent say ‘Yes’ to the amendments
Egypt approves amendments, prepares for next step
Egyptians get taste of democracy in post-Mubarak era
Egyptians approve constitutional changes, clearing way for elections

Egypt has zero recent history of democracy or diverse political parties. So, obviously, whatever groups are already the most organized will benefit the most from the early elections just approved. And what’s the most organized group in Egypt? The Muslim Brotherhood. What happens if the Muslim Brotherhood comes to dominate the democratically elected parliament after this summer’s elections and, therefore, gets to write the new Egyptian constitution?

/it could very well turn out to be “one man, one vote, one time