Hacking The High Ground

Not content to merely cyberattack our civilian and military computer systems every second of every day, the Chinese have now taken their hacking attacks to a whole new, higher level.

Chinese Military Suspected in Hacker Attacks on U.S. Satellites

Computer hackers, possibly from the Chinese military, interfered with two U.S. government satellites four times in 2007 and 2008 through a ground station in Norway, according to a congressional commission.

The intrusions on the satellites, used for earth climate and terrain observation, underscore the potential danger posed by hackers, according to excerpts from the final draft of the annual report by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. The report is scheduled to be released next month.

“Such interference poses numerous potential threats, particularly if achieved against satellites with more sensitive functions,” according to the draft. “Access to a satellite‘s controls could allow an attacker to damage or destroy the satellite. An attacker could also deny or degrade as well as forge or otherwise manipulate the satellite’s transmission.”

See also:
Hackers Interfered With Two U.S. Satellites, Draft Report Says
Hackers Interfered With 2 US Government Satellites
Hackers reportedly behind U.S. government satellite disruptions
Hackers Targeted U.S. Government Satellites
Chinese military may have hacked US satellites
China may have hacked US satellites
Hackers Targeted U.S. Government Satellites
U.S. satellites tampered by hackers
Hackers interfered with two U.S. satellites, report says
Chinese hackers suspected of interfering with US satellites
New hacker target: Government satellites
Chinese hackers may have attacked U.S. satellites
China suspect in US satellite interference: report
US reportedly attacked by Chinese hackers linked with the military
US Satellites hacked by Chinese Military says Congressional Commission

Given their ongoing and constant obsession with conducting cyberwarfare, it’s hardly surprising that the Chinese would be interested in attacking satellites. After all, in the event of hostilities, taking out the enemy’s satellites would effectively render them “blind”. The U.S. military is particularly dependent on satellite technology for communication and navigation, so it would only be logical for the Chinese, either by hacking or with kinetic strikes, to attempt to neutralize our satellite network and with it our technological advantage. The question is, what are we doing to counter this extremely obvious and serious threat?

/does anyone still remember how to navigate using a map and compass?

Achmed, Tell Them What They’ve Won!

Most radio stations, when they have a contest, give out prizes like cash or concert tickets or maybe even a trip, but no, not the bloodthirsty Muslim jihadis, they bring the concept of radio contest prizes to a whole different level.

Al-Shabab radio gives weapons prize to Somali children

A radio station run by Somalia’s al-Shabab Islamist group has awarded weapons to children who won a Koran-reciting and general knowledge contest.

Andulus radio, based near Mogadishu, gave the group which won first prize in the Ramadan competition an AK-47 rifle and the equivalent of $700 (£450).

The second prize-winners received an AK-47 and $500, while the third prize was two hand grenades and $400.

Al-Shabab, linked to al-Qaeda, controls much of southern and central Somalia.

See also:
SOMALIA: Al-Shabab awards children with weapons and bombs [PHOTOS]
Gun is Grand Prize in Al-Shabab Children’s Contest
Somalia: Militant-run radio station gives kids guns, bombs as prizes in Quran contest
Somali teens earn guns in Quran recitation contest
AK-47 first prize in Somali radio competition for children
Somalia’s Al-Shabab Gives Weapons Prize to Children
Somali kids win weapons in Koran contest
Al-Shabab radio contest awards guns to kids in Somalia
Islamist radio station in Somalia giving guns, bombs to children
Prizes for Kids Koran Recital Contest: AK-47s, Grenades

It worth noting that these weapons “prizes” were awarded to the children for reciting a Muslim religious text, the Koran, during a Muslim religious holiday, Ramadan. There’s nothing like giving deadly weapons to children for demonstrating religious prowess during a religious holiday. What manner of [expletive deleted] up religion condones that?

/nevermind, that was a rhetorical question, once again, Islam proves itself to be the religion of mayhem and mass murder, brainwashing each new generation of children into the bloody cult of violent Jihad as young as possible

War By Any Other Name

China is at it again, waging a back door war against the West. Usually, they just try and steal our technology, now they’re going to try and cripple our technology production.

China Signals Further Rare-Earth Cuts

Chinese officials are signaling plans to further reduce rare-earth exports next year, sustaining its controls of the metals—key ingredients in high-technology batteries and defense products—that have already severely frustrated foreign governments.

Reducing the export quotas is under consideration, but it’s too early to talk about any reduction rate,” Lin Donglu, secretary general of the Chinese Society of Rare Earths, told Dow Jones Newswires on Tuesday. The state-run English-language China Daily on Tuesday quoted an unnamed Commerce Ministry official suggesting that cuts of as much as 30% from already-trimmed 2010 levels are possible. A Commerce Ministry official declined to confirm the report and the ministry didn’t reply to faxed questions Tuesday.

Speaking at a conference on rare-earth elements in southeastern China on Tuesday, Chinese officials, including a Commerce Ministry deputy director, Jiang Fan, highlighted their concern about aggressive development of the country’s resources, attendees said. One official there suggested China, by far the world’s largest producer and consumer, could even become an importer.

“Their main thrust was China needs to work to protect its rare-earth industry,” said Nigel Tunna, managing director of Metals Pages Ltd., host of the conference.

China’s decision in recent months to impose tougher quotas on rare-earth metal exports has sparked outcry from Tokyo to Washington.

China, which uses around half of its output of the elements and produces around 97% of world supply, says its limits—which this year aim to cut exports around 40% from 2009—reflect its growing environmental awareness, are perfectly legal and won’t be used as a policy tool.

Yet, foreign importers worry reductions are designed to lift their metals import costs, undermine their high-technology industries and unnerve their defense departments. The metals, 17 chemically similar and expensive-to-mine elements, are critical to the manufacture of products from iPhones to smart bombs.

See also:
China reins in rare earth exports
China to Cut Rare Earth Export Quotas by Up to 30%, Daily Says
Report: China to Reduce Rare Earths Exports
China Halts Shipments to U.S. of Tech-Crucial Minerals
China Reins in Rare Earth Exports
China Official Says No Plans to Cut Rare Earth Quotas
UPDATE 1-US checking if China halted rare earth shipments
China-Japan Rare Earth Fracas Continues
Japan Looks for Rare Earth Alternatives
Kan Says Japan Should Consider Stockpiling of Rare-Earth Metals
Decline in Rare-Earth Exports Rattles Germany
China’s Rare Earths Gambit
More on Rare Earths: Looking for a Way out From Under a Monopoly

Obviously, this isn’t a good development because there’s not a hell of a lot we can do about it unless we want to start an all out trade war. They’re got most of the rare earth metals and we’re dependent on it.

/at a minimum, expect prices to rise for any technology that requires these metals