Spinning Zelaya

To hear Hillary tell it, you’d think it was reminiscent of MacArthur’s triumphant return to the Philippines.

Clinton, Arias: Zelaya return could help end Honduras crisis

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Costa Rican President Oscar Arias said Monday that ousted leader Manuel Zelaya’s return to Honduras offers an opportunity to end the country’s political crisis.

“Now that President Zelaya is back it would be opportune to restore him to his position under appropriate circumstances, get on with the election that is currently scheduled for November, have a peaceful transition of presidential authority and get Honduras back to constitutional and democratic order,” Clinton told reporters as she met with Arias in New York.

Well, what Hillary didn’t say is that, although Zelaya sneaked across the border like a thief in the night, he’s technically still not back in Honduras, he’s hiding like a coward in the Brazilian embassy to avoid arrest.

Honduras under curfew as ousted president returns

Ousted President Manuel Zelaya sneaked back into Honduras on Monday almost three months after he was toppled in a coup, and took refuge in the Brazilian embassy to avoid arrest by the de facto government.

The move forced de facto leaders in Honduras to impose a 15-hour curfew according to an official announcement on local media.

. . .

Mr. Zelaya had been in exile mostly in Nicaragua while a de facto government that backed the coup against him became more entrenched in office, defying international calls to allow the leftist president to return.

But his sudden appearance in Honduras on Monday increased pressure on the country’s ruler Roberto Micheletti to cede power and increased the chance of violent protests or a standoff at the embassy

. . .

Micheletti, whose government is not recognized internationally, earlier on Monday vowed to have Zelaya detained.

“The moment that we know he has entered the country we are going to go ahead with his arrest. We have search and capture teams to carry out his arrest,” Micheletti told Reuters before news broke that Zelaya had taken refuge in the embassy.

See also:
Curfew imposed in Honduras after Zelaya’s return
Zelaya returns to Honduras
Ousted leader returns to Honduras, defies arrest
Brazil Confirms Manuel Zelaya At Embassy In Honduras
Zelaya takes refuge at Brazilian embassy in Honduras
Ousted president Zelaya appears in Honduras
Ousted president Zelaya returns to Honduran capital: Chavez
Selective Meddle For Communist Dictators
Still Stuck On Stupid And Doubling Down

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Seeing as how Zelaya was lawfully removed from office by the Honduran high court, according to Honduran law, it’s still puzzling as to why the Obama administration has obsessively come down on the side of all the communist and socialist regimes in the region. Then again, after watching the Obama administration in action for over six months now, maybe it’s not really that puzzling after all.

/Zelaya can’t hide in the Brazilian embassy forever, as soon as he comes out the Honduran government should arrest him and throw his Chavez wannabe ass in jail

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Selective Meddle For Communist Dictators

Obama won’t meddle in Iran, while their government is shooting people in the streets.

But hey, when it comes to Honduras, he jumps right in . . .

Obama Calls for Return of Honduran President

U.S. President Barack Obama says the removal of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was illegal and sets a bad precedent for the region. Mr. Obama spoke after a White House meeting with Colombian President Alvaro Uribe.

President Obama says the ouster of President Zelaya by the Honduran military must be reversed.

“We believe that the coup was not legal and that President Zelaya remains the President of Honduras – the democratically elected president there,” said President Obama.

Mr. Obama says the United States is joining with others, including the Organization of American States, demanding that President Zelaya be reinstated. He says there is great concern throughout the region about the situation in Honduras.

An illegal coup, really? Let’s see if we can figure out what’s going on here.

Ousted leader plans return to Honduras

Ousted President Manuel Zelaya of Honduras continued to build support yesterday for his return home, but the country’s de facto rulers said he would be arrested the minute he set foot on national territory.

As Zelaya addressed a supportive UN audience in New York, Hondurans in Tegucigalpa were demonstrating against and, in smaller numbers, in favor of the deposed leftist leader. Zelaya was flown to Costa Rica in exile early Sunday after soldiers removed him from his home.

Honduran Attorney General Luis Alberto Rubi, who clashed frequently with Zelaya, said arrest warrants had been issued accusing Zelaya of 18 crimes, including treason and abuse of authority. Rubi said authorities would ask Interpol to detain Zelaya, who has said he plans to return to Honduras tomorrow with a delegation of regional heads of state and other officials.

“The justice tribunals of my country have issued orders to capture [Zelaya] because he broke laws,’’ said Roberto Micheletti, the former head of Congress who legislators chose to replace Zelaya after the army deposed him.

In Washington, where the Obama administration has joined regional leaders in condemning the coup, US officials said yesterday they had severed contacts with the Honduran military, with which they maintained close ties for decades. The United States also will consider cutting off hundreds of millions of dollars in aid, officials said. To do so requires the administration to formally label Zelaya’s ouster a military coup.

In Tegucigalpa, the capital, several thousand opponents of Zelaya filled a downtown square waving blue-and-white Honduran flags and denouncing Zelaya’s ties to Latin leftists such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez.

Repeatedly invoking God and fatherland, Micheletti thanked his followers “united here to protect democracy’’ and pledged to go ahead with presidential elections scheduled for the end of November.

He clasped the hand of General Romeo Vásquez, the army chief who Zelaya had tried to fire, and raised their arms overhead in a sign of victory. Micheletti said army officers were the heroes of the moment for having seized Zelaya from his bedroom Sunday morning and bundled him off into exile, still in his pajamas.

“It wasn’t a coup!’’ the crowd chanted. “Democracy, yes! Communism, no!’’

Most of the wrath seemed directed more at Chávez than at Zelaya. Chávez is seen as a heavy-handed bully by many, and his growing alliance with Zelaya made many Hondurans fear their country was being pulled to the radical left.

So, under international pressure, Zelaya was supposed to gloriously waltz back into power yesterday. Hold the phone, not so fast, the Obama talking points are evolving.

US says Zelaya wise not to return yet to Honduras

Ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya made a “wise” decision to postpone his return to his country, a senior Obama administration official said on Wednesday.

The official said it was important that the Organization of American States be given an opportunity to attempt to find a diplomatic solution to the problem in Honduras before Zelaya tries to return to his country.

But wait, there’s more.

Zelaya accused of drug ties

The regime that ousted Manuel Zelaya in Honduras claimed Tuesday that the deposed president allowed tons of cocaine to be flown into the Central American country on its way to the United States.

“Every night, three or four Venezuelan-registered planes land without the permission of appropriate authorities and bring thousands of pounds … and packages of money that are the fruit of drug trafficking,” its foreign minister, Enrique Ortez, told CNN en Espanol.

“We have proof of all of this. Neighboring governments have it. The DEA has it,” he added.

See also:
Beware of the Not-So-Hidden Agendas In Honduras
Ousted Honduran president riled old guard, business
Southcom chills ties with Honduran military
Honduras and the Bolivarian Revolution
Isolated Nicaragua senses opportunity in Honduras crisis

Still confused about where Obama is on this and where the United States should be? Let’s go to the scorecard.

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And, as usual, Charles Krauthammer nails reality to the objective wall.

Any further questions?

/class dismissed