Do The Microsoft Patch Dance

The dance that never ends.

Microsoft Patch

Microsoft released 13 security bulletins, patching 22 vulnerabilities across its product line, including two critical updates affecting Internet Explorer and the Windows DNS Server.

While Microsoft issued fewer updates this month, August was still marked as a busy month for system administrators. Adobe Systems Inc., which issues fixes on a quarterly cycle, issued a critical security update late Tuesday, repairing seven flaws in its Shockwave Player, more than a dozen holes in its Flash Player and an error in its Flash Media Server.

Microsoft addressed seven vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer including two zero-day flaws. According to MS11-057, Microsoft said an attacker who successfully exploited any of the vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the local user. Microsoft said the most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted Web page using Internet Explorer

. . .

Another noteworthy bulletin is MS11-065, which resolves a vulnerability in the Remote Desktop Protocol. Although the security bulletin is rated important for users of Windows Server 2003, Miller said Microsoft has seen attacks targeting the flaw in the wild. The flaw can be targeted if an attacker sends a malicious remote desktop protocol connection request to the victim’s computer which could cause the system to crash.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for August 2011
Microsoft Fixes IE, Windows DNS Server Flaws In Patch Tuesday Update
Microsoft Patches 22 Security Holes
Microsoft Security Patch Fixes 20-Year-Old Flaw
Microsoft fixes 22 security bugs
Microsoft’s August Patch Tuesday security update to tackle critical flaws in IE and Windows Server
Your Microsoft Patch Tuesday update for August 2011
Microsoft to Fix 22 Software Flaws in Its August Patch Tuesday Update
Hefty Microsoft August Patch Delivers 13 Security Fixes
IE, Windows server bugs likely to be exploited soon
Microsoft expecting exploits for critical IE vulnerabilities
Microsoft Update

Get busy downloading.

/so, until the next Patch Tuesday . . .

Tuesday Fun With Microsoft

It’s another big one and the flaws are serious.

Microsoft Fixes 24 Bugs in June Patch Tuesday

Microsoft addressed 24 security vulnerabilities across 16 security bulletins in June’s Patch Tuesday update. This will be Microsoft’s second-largest Patch Tuesday in 2011 after April’s gargantuan release.

Microsoft patched the Windows operating system, all supported versions of Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, SQL Server, Forefront, .NET/Silverlight, Active Directory and Hyper-V, the company said in its Patch Tuesday advisory released June 14. Of the patches, nine have been rated as “critical,” and seven have been ranked as important, according to Microsoft.

Microsoft called out four critical updates as top priorities on the Microsoft Security Response Center blog. They include a fix for all versions of the SMB Client on Windows (MS11-043), 11 bugs in all versions of Internet Explorer (MS11-050), another Windows flaw (MS11-052) and two issues in the DFS client for all versions of Windows (MS11-042), according to Trustworthy Computing’s Angela Gunn.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for June 2011
Microsoft ‘Patch Tuesday’ Fixes 24 Flaws In 16 Updates
MS Patch Tuesday: Gaping holes haunt Internet Explorer browser
Patch Tuesday Fixes Dangerous Flaws with Exploits Imminent
Microsoft plugs 34 holes; Adobe fixes Flash Player bug
Microsoft patches critical IE9, Windows bugs
Patch Tuesday heralds a busy spell for admins
Microsoft Puts Out 16 Patches, 9 Critical, for June
Microsoft issues 16 bulletins, 9 critical including SMB, IE fixes
June Gloom: Microsoft Releases 16 Bulletins for Patch Tuesday
Windows Update

Damn, if Windows was a car that had been “repaired” this many times, it wouldn’t have any original parts left.

/anyway, get busy with the updating, don’t let the bad guys in, at least until they find new holes in Widows that Microsoft will have to patch next month

Patchapalooza Tuesday

It’s a triple witching day for computer patches.

Microsoft, Adobe, and Oracle Patch Nearly 100 Vulnerabilities

It’s a busy day for IT administrators and information security professionals. Not only is today Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday for the month of April, it is also the day of Adobe’s quarterly security updates. In total, there are 40 vulnerabilities being addressed today–many of them rated as critical and exposing systems to potential remote exploits.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday

A Microsoft spokesperson e-mailed the following “Today, as part of its routine monthly security update cycle, Microsoft is releasing 11 security bulletins to address 25 vulnerabilities: five rated Critical, five rated Important and one rated Moderate. This month’s release affects Windows, Microsoft Office, and Microsoft Exchange. Additionally, the Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) was updated to include Win32/Magania.”

Qualys CTO Wolfgang Kandek noted in his blog post “Microsoft’s patch release for April contains 11 bulletins covering 25 vulnerabilities. The bulletins address a wide array of operating systems and software packages, IT administrators with a good inventory of their installed base will have an easier time to evaluating which machines need patches.”

“The critical Microsoft WinVerifyTrust signature validation vulnerability can be used to really enhance social engineering efforts,” said Joshua Talbot, security intelligence manager, Symantec Security Response in an e-mailed statement. “Targeted attacks are popular and since social engineering plays such a large role in them, plan on seeing exploits developed for this vulnerability.”

Talbot continued “It allows an attacker to fool Windows into thinking that a malicious program was created by a legitimate vendor. If a user begins to download an application and they see the Windows’ notification telling them who created it, they might think twice before proceeding if it’s from an unfamiliar source. This vulnerability allows an attacker to force Windows to report to the user that the application was created by any vendor the attacker chooses to impersonate.”

Andrew Storms, director of security operations for nCircle offered this analysis “More movies and more malware: that’s what we’ve got to look forward to on the Internet. Microsoft is patching critical bugs in Windows Media Player and Direct Show this month–both of these bugs lend themselves to online video malware. If you put these fixes together with Apple’s recent patch of Quicktime, it’s pretty obvious that attackers are finding a lot of victims through video.”

nCircle’s Tyler Reguly points out that there is also a greater message to be learned from the patches. “As an avid Windows XP user, I’m leaning more and more towards making the jump to Windows 7; with the added security it just makes sense. Looking at the top two vulnerabilities (MS10-027 and MS10-026), my Windows XP systems are vulnerable to both, yet my Windows 7 laptop isn’t affected by either of them. The newer operating system just makes sense.”

Adobe Quarterly Update

As if eleven security bulletins fixing 25 different vulnerabilities wasn’t enough, IT administrators must also address the critical updates released today from Adobe. nCircle’s Storms points out that “Every one of the 15 bugs can be used for remote code execution. Given the increase in the number of attacks that use Adobe PDF files, all users are strongly urged to upgrade immediately.”

Storms added “In stark contrast to Microsoft’s patch process, Adobe’s security bulletin information lacks details, especially critical information about potential workarounds. For enterprises that have a long test cycle, it can take weeks or even months to roll out updates. With no workaround information, Adobe leaves their enterprise customers vulnerable and security teams everywhere frustrated and annoyed.”

Andrew Brandt, lead threat research analyst with Webroot, warns “What’s more, they should be aware that Foxit Reader–which also reads PDFs–is actually more vulnerable.”

It is also worth noting that Adobe has rolled out its new update system which it has been beta testing over the past couple of months. Users can now configure Adobe software to automatically install updates, enabling security patches to be applied without requiring any user intervention.

Don’t Forget Oracle

Wait, there’s more! Not wanting to be left out of the patch day festivities, Oracle has also unleashed its own deluge of updates–more than Microsoft and Adobe combined.

There is a little bit of good news, though. Very few organizations will actually be impacted by every single one of the disclosed vulnerabilities. Qualys’ Kandek points out “This is a big release for Microsoft, addressing a wide selection of software. IT administrators probably will not have all of the included software packages and configurations installed in their environment and therefore will need to install only a subset of the 11 bulletins.”

The same logic holds true for Oracle and, to a lesser extent Adobe–although Adobe Reader is fairly ubiquitous. Have fun!

See also:
Microsoft, Adobe, Oracle offer fixes in big Patch Tuesday
Patch Tuesday: Microsoft safeguards video, Adobe secures PDFs
Microsoft Patch Tuesday Fixes 5 Critical Flaws
Microsoft Targets Media Flaws In April Patches
Microsoft blocks ‘movies-to-malware’ attacks
Microsoft Releases Multiple Updates; Vista SP0 Support Ends
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for April 2010
New Adobe Auto-Updater Debuts On Super (Patch) Tuesday
Adobe Patches Acrobat/Reader Vulnerabilities, Updates on Updating
Security update available for Adobe Reader and Acrobat

/so, you know the drill people, get busy downloading those patches, hope you’re not on dial up!

If It’s Tuesday It Must Be Time To Patch Windows Again

Microsoft issues urgent Windows, Office security patches

Microsoft today released patches for 26 recently-discovered security holes affecting users of Windows and Office. It is urging companies, in particular, to prioritize patching certain vulnerabilities that are likely to precipitate active cyberattacks within the next 30 days.

The most worrisome security holes are easy for cybercriminals to exploit. Bad guys routinely reverse engineer Microsoft’s patches and quickly create and spread malicious programs designed to seek out and take of control of PCs that aren’t current on patching, security experts say.

Microsoft normally issues security updates on the second Tuesday of each month, known as Patch Tuesday. Most home PC users get security updates automatically, via Windows auto update. Home users just need to follow prompts to restart their PCs, once the patches are downloaded to their harddrives.

However, corporations typically take weeks to test security updates and install them company wide. “While everyone has been focused on the volume of updates today, it should be noted that there are 12 vulnerabilities with Microsoft’s highest exploitability rating,” says Sheldon Malm, senior director of security at vulnerability management firm Rapid 7. “This certainly raises the bar for customers to plan, test, and rollout these updates more quickly than usual.”

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for February 2010
Microsoft Plugs 26 Vulnerabilities With 13 Patches In Record Update
Microsoft delivers huge Windows security update
Microsoft Fixes 26 Vulnerabilities In Windows, Office
Slew of Critical Updates from Microsoft
Microsoft Fixes Windows Security Vulnerabilities in Patch Tuesday Update
Microsoft warns of TLS/SSL flaw in Windows

/lovely software, by now you should know the patching drill