Duqu Shoots, It Scores!

Duqu goes in where Stuxnet has been . . .

Iran claims defence computer systems hit by another ‘supervirus’

Anti-virus experts last month identified a virus called “Duqu” that they said shared properties with the now famous “Stuxnet” worm, which spread across the world but is thought to have been successfully targeted at the nuclear programme’s centrifuges, the devices that enrich uranium to create nuclear fuel.

It was not clear on Monday from the Iranian statement whether Duqu had also struck nuclear facilities, but it was the first admission of damage.

“We are in the initial phase of fighting the Duqu virus,” Gholamreza Jalali, the head of Iran’s civil defence programme, said. “The final report which says which organisations the virus has spread to and what its impacts are has not been completed yet.

See also:
Iran Working to Control Duqu Virus Attack
Iran detects Duqu virus in system
Duqu Virus Detected in Iran
Iran says has detected Duqu computer virus
Iran finds Duqu-infected systems
Duqu infiltrates Iranian networks
Iran admits Duqu attack; denies report its nukes are for war, not power
Iran detects Duqu infections
Iran wrestles Duqu malware infestation
Security researcher says Iran to blame for its own Duqu infections
Iran claims Duqu virus aimed at sabotaging its nuclear sites
‘Duqu virus aiming at Iran’s nuclear sites’
Iranians say nuke project hit by new computer virus
Iran produces antivirus software against new worm
Iran Develops Software to Thwart Duqu Virus Attack
‘Iran can thwart Duqu spyware’
Iran says Duqu malware under ‘control’
Iran says it has ‘controlled’ Duqu malware attack
Beyond Stuxnet

Duqu is the, arguably more sophisticated, follow on to Stuxnet, which took control of Iranian uranium enrichment centrifuges and spun them at speeds well beyond their design capability until they failed. Stuxnet was an offensive weapon. Unlike Stuxnet, Duqu is, at least so far, strictly a reconnaissance tool, gathering and reporting back information on systems related to Iran’s nuclear program, preparing the battlespace as a prelude to a future attack if you will. Whether the next attack will be another
Stuxnet like cyberstrike or physically digging in the Iranian dirt is a layman’s guess. One thing’s for sure, the next attack on Iran’s nuclear program is coming and Iran won’t be able to stop it.

Iran claims to have thwarted Duqu but, then again, they said the same thing about Stuxnet and Stuxnet blew out their centrifuges. Anyway, if Iran is just now admitting that they’ve been infected by Duqu, Duqu may have already accomplished its reconnaissance mission and gone dormant. Whatever information Iran releases publicly is pretty much a lie, propaganda, you can safely assume that whenever they acknowledge their nuclear program has been compromised, the damage is much worse than they’re letting on.

And remember, whether it’s another cyberattack or airstrikes against Iranian nuclear facilities, all it does is buy us time. Stuxnet set the Iranians back, but it didn’t deter them. Destroying some of their nuclear facilities won’t deter them either, in fact, it’ll probably make them even more defiant. The only endgame that will bring closure is regime change. And think about it, if we do that, we’ve just resolved 70+% of the world’s instability problems.

/my vote is for a comprehensive, all hands on deck, leave no stone unturned, decapitation campaign, Mullahs and the Republican Guard gots to live and work somewhere and I bet we have the GPS coordinates

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Western Education Is Sacrilege

Another, day, another country, more Dar al-Harb, the Religion of Murder and Mayhem rampages on.

At least 69 dead in north Nigeria sect attacks

Residents fearfully left their homes Saturday to bury their dead in northeast Nigeria following a series of coordinated attacks that killed at least 69 people and left a new police headquarters in ruins, government offices burned and symbols of state power destroyed.

A radical Muslim sect known locally as Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the attacks in Borno and Yobe states, with the worst damage done in and around the city of Damaturu. The group also promised to continue its bloody sectarian fight against Nigeria’s weak central government, with residents nervously moving through empty streets, waiting for the next attack.

. . .

Boko Haram wants to implement strict Shariah law across Nigeria, an oil-rich nation of more than 160 million which has a predominantly Christian south and a Muslim north. Its name means “Western education is sacrilege” in the local Hausa language, but instead of schooling, it rejects Western ideals like Nigeria’s U.S.-styled democracy that followers believe have destroyed the country with corrupt politicians.

See also:
Nigerian insurgents unleash deadly attacks
Bloody weekend; 66 killed as Boko Haram wreaks havoc
11 policemen, 79 others killed in Yobe bombing
Attacks in Nigeria Leave at Least 65 Dead
At least 65 killed in attacks on Nigerian city: aid agency
More than 100 dead in Nigeria attacks: Red Cross
Nigeria group threatens more deadly attacks
Nigeria: Boko Haram’s deadly attacks show Islamists’ growing reach
US: Bomb attacks possible in Nigeria capital
Nigerian forces hunt killers, locals demand security
Pope urges ‘end to all violence’ in Nigeria
FACTBOX-What is Nigeria’s Boko Haram?
Boko Haram

Much like the Taliban in Afghanistan, the Boko Haram kill and maim, in the name of Islam, to prevent the education of Muslim children.

/is there any other world religion where ignorance is a virtue?

Hacking The High Ground

Not content to merely cyberattack our civilian and military computer systems every second of every day, the Chinese have now taken their hacking attacks to a whole new, higher level.

Chinese Military Suspected in Hacker Attacks on U.S. Satellites

Computer hackers, possibly from the Chinese military, interfered with two U.S. government satellites four times in 2007 and 2008 through a ground station in Norway, according to a congressional commission.

The intrusions on the satellites, used for earth climate and terrain observation, underscore the potential danger posed by hackers, according to excerpts from the final draft of the annual report by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. The report is scheduled to be released next month.

“Such interference poses numerous potential threats, particularly if achieved against satellites with more sensitive functions,” according to the draft. “Access to a satellite‘s controls could allow an attacker to damage or destroy the satellite. An attacker could also deny or degrade as well as forge or otherwise manipulate the satellite’s transmission.”

See also:
Hackers Interfered With Two U.S. Satellites, Draft Report Says
Hackers Interfered With 2 US Government Satellites
Hackers reportedly behind U.S. government satellite disruptions
Hackers Targeted U.S. Government Satellites
Chinese military may have hacked US satellites
China may have hacked US satellites
Hackers Targeted U.S. Government Satellites
U.S. satellites tampered by hackers
Hackers interfered with two U.S. satellites, report says
Chinese hackers suspected of interfering with US satellites
New hacker target: Government satellites
Chinese hackers may have attacked U.S. satellites
China suspect in US satellite interference: report
US reportedly attacked by Chinese hackers linked with the military
US Satellites hacked by Chinese Military says Congressional Commission

Given their ongoing and constant obsession with conducting cyberwarfare, it’s hardly surprising that the Chinese would be interested in attacking satellites. After all, in the event of hostilities, taking out the enemy’s satellites would effectively render them “blind”. The U.S. military is particularly dependent on satellite technology for communication and navigation, so it would only be logical for the Chinese, either by hacking or with kinetic strikes, to attempt to neutralize our satellite network and with it our technological advantage. The question is, what are we doing to counter this extremely obvious and serious threat?

/does anyone still remember how to navigate using a map and compass?

Aid And Comfort To The Enemy

Let’s see, China launches cyberattacks and conducts internet espionage against the United States 24/7/365 and our U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning China about their vulnerabilities? WTF?

China’s Infrastructure Vulnerable to Cyber Attack

Software widely used in China to help run weapons systems, utilities and chemical plants has bugs that hackers could exploit to damage public infrastructure, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

The department issued an advisory on Thursday warning of vulnerabilities in software applications from Beijing-based Sunway ForceControl Technology Co that hackers could exploit to launch attacks on critical infrastructure.

See also:
SCADA Vulnerabilities Patched in Two Industrial Control Software from China
Chinese Weapon Systems Vulnerable To SCADA Hack
US warns China software risk to public infrastructure
US Warns of Problems in Chinese SCADA Software
Software bugs discovered in Chinese-made applications
China’s weapons systems have exploitable software bugs
Department Of Homeland Security Cites China Vulnerability
Exclusive: China software bug makes infrastructure vulnerable
US reveals Stuxnet-style vuln in Chinese SCADA ‘ware
Critical vulnerability in industrial control software

China is not our friend, why are we feeding the hand that bites us? Why aren’t we keeping these discovered Chinese vulnerabilities to ourselves in case we might actually need to use them in the event of escalated hostilities with China?

/and just when did the DHS become the CDHS, Chinese Department of Homeland Security, protecting the homeland of a hostile country?

They Got Fooled Again

Much like the United States, Iran seems to have a real problem protecting its computer networks. Someone seems to be obsessed with sabotaging their nuclear program. I wonder who that might be?

Second computer virus infiltrates Iran’s computer systems

Iran has discovered a second computer virus designed to damage government computer systems.

The discovery of the virus, called Stars, was announced Monday by a senior Iranian official, Gholam-Reza Jalali, head of an Iranian cyberdefense agency, according to reports.

Jalali said in a statement that the damage from the virus, which looks like a regular government computer file, has been minimal and that Iranian scientists are currently studying the virus.

The virus was aimed at nuclear facilities, according to the Washington Post, and seems to suggest “a broader campaign by foreign saboteurs to undermine Iran’s atomic energy program.”

See also:
New Computer Strike Could Target Iranian Atomic Sites
Fresh Virus Outbreak Affects Iran’s Computer Systems
Iran discovers 2nd virus attack
New cyber attack targets Iran
Iran Claims Stars Virus a Second Cyber-Attack
Iranian official: New computer worm discovered
Iran investigates Stars virus
Iran Says It Was Targeted With Second Worm, Stars
As the Worm Turns: Iran Sees Stars
Iran says is uncovers second cyber attack
Iran Under Fresh Malware Attack
Security experts can’t verify Iran’s claims of new worm
Is the Stars Worm Just a Hoax?

Well, I certainly hope the Stars virus attack on Iran’s nuclear program isn’t a hoax and does as much damage as the Stuxnet worm, which was apparently wildly more effective than Iran is admitting to.

/you’ll note that Iran still hasn’t managed to power up the Bushehr reactor, which is as good a yardstick as any that their nuclear program has been ground to a halt

Fun With Electromagnetic Energy

The Navy thinks they’re going to put this on the deck of a ship? Damn thing looks like it would cause rolling brownouts in Los Angeles.

Navy Sets World Record With Incredible, Sci-Fi Weapon

An electromagnetic railgun offers a velocity previously unattainable in a conventional weapon, speeds that are incredibly powerful on their own. In fact, since the projectile doesn’t have any explosives itself, it relies upon that kinetic energy to do damage. And at 11 a.m. today, the Navy produced a 33-megajoule firing — more than three times the previous record set by the Navy in 2008.

“It bursts radially, but it’s hard to quantify,” said Roger Ellis, electromagnetic railgun program manager with the Office of Naval Research. To convey a sense of just how much damage, Ellis told FoxNews.com that the big guns on the deck of a warship are measured by their muzzle energy in megajoules. A single megajoule is roughly equivalent to a 1-ton car traveling at 100 mph. Multiple that by 33 and you get a picture of what would happen when such a weapon hits a target.

See also:
Railgun, futuristic weapon, tested by Navy
Railgun shot heard round the world
U.S. Navy Railgun breaks speed records
Futuristic Railgun Weapon Sets US Navy Record [VIDEO]
Railgun shots break record
Railgun moves closer to real use
Navy’s Mach 7 gun can kill from 100 miles away
Navy test fires electromagnetic cannon
Navy: Dahlgren Railgun test is successful
Navy railgun: weapon from hell or game changer? – photo gallery and video
Electromagnetic Railgun Program – Office of Naval Research
Railgun

To make this technology even remotely practical for use at sea, the Navy’s going to have to make the railgun a lot smaller and more energy efficient.

/oh, and they’re going to have to figure out a way to keep the gun rails from melting every time they fire it

If It Weren’t For Bad Luck . . .

. . . the HMS Astute wouldn’t have any luck at all. Remember when she ran aground two weeks ago? Well, apparently the grounding wasn’t the worst part of ordeal.

HMS Hapless: submarine in crash No2 with tug

An investigation was already being held into the grounding of HMS Astute on a shingle bank off Skye last month after the £1 billion vessel, whose key attribute is stealth, was turned into a tourist attraction.

Now a new inquiry is underway after it was revealed that having survived the incident relatively unscathed, the submarine was damaged in a collision with the tug boat hired to free it.

The Anglian Prince was contracted by the navy to help pull the sub to safety.

But during the operation the towing rope became caught in the tug’s propeller and pulled the vessels together, damaging the Astute’s starboard foreplane.

A navy spokesman said the sub will be repaired at Faslane and trials will resume in due course.

He added: “The inquiry into the damage sustained by Astute is now complete, although the findings have still to be released to naval officers.”

The Anglian Prince, based in Stornoway, is normally under contract to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, but the Ministry of Defence took over its operation temporarily to help Astute.

It was undamaged despite the tangle with a nuclear submarine and is back in Stornoway, having since helped a cargo boat which got into difficulty off Rum this week.

See also:
Stricken Sub Astute Damaged By Rescue Tug
U.K.’s Stricken Nuclear Submarine HMS Astute Collided With Rescue Vessel
Revealed: Rescue tug crashed into stranded submarine HMS Astute causing millions of pounds of damage
Tug damaged HMS Astute while freeing it
Astute damaged in tug collision
HMS Astute submarine damaged by towboat
Stranded British submarine damaged in tug collision: navy
Call for debate on scrap-threat coastguard tug
Not So Astute

Thirty year old tugboat 1, brand new, multi-billion dollar nuclear submarine 0, talk about adding insult to injury, what an indignity. The Astute seems to be jinxed.

/maybe they should just scrap the Astute and put the Anglian Prince into active naval service, the tugboat has a better anti-submarine warfare record