Lady Al Qaeda Goes To Jail, Pakistan Seethes

Remember boys and girls, Pakistan is our ally.

Pakistani Woman Sentenced for Attacks on U.S. Troops

A suspected al-Qaeda agent was sentenced yesterday to more than eight decades in U.S. prison for the July 2008 attempted killings of U.S. troops, Agence France-Presse reported. At the time of the MIT-educated neuroscientist’s arrest, she was reportedly in possession of instructions for making a radiological “dirty bomb” (see GSN, Feb. 4).

Pakistani-born Aafia Siddiqui was convicted in U.S. federal court in February for the attempted shootings of several U.S. soldiers and FBI agents interrogating her in an Afghan police station. The 38-year-old mother of three was charged with seizing a serviceman’s rifle and opening fire while yelling “death to America,” though no one was struck by the bullets. Siddiqui took a bullet to the stomach before she was restrained.

. . .

Among her possessions at the time of her 2008 arrest in Afghanistan were documents referring to a “mass casualty attack” on New York City and containers filled with sodium cyanide, the Associated Press reported (Tom Hays, Associated Press/Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 24).

So, she was an al Qaeda operative who tried to kill American soldiers while screaming “death to America” and had in her possession plans and materials for a dirty bomb attack on New York City. You’d think our close ally Pakistan would be glad and grateful that this terrorist scum menace is off the streets for the next 86 years, right? Well, you couldn’t be more wrong.

Pakistan angry over terror conviction in US

The country’s leaders were quick to show their outrage at the sentence handed down to a Pakistani woman convicted of attacking U.S. agents, as were opposition politicians. By the time weekly prayers rolled round, protesters were battling police and the Pakistani Taliban had offered its support.

The sentencing of Aafia Siddique to 86 years in an American jail left enemies and political opponents reading from the same script Friday, riding a wave of anger on behalf of a woman widely believed to be an innocent victim of a vengeful, post 9/11 American justice system.

See also:
Judge Gives Pakistani Woman 86 Years in Attack
Pakistan neuroscientist given 86 years for shooting at US agents
Pakistani Scientist Sentenced To 86 Years For Trying To Kill US Agents
Pakistani scientist gets 86 years for shooting
‘Lady al Qaeda’ sentenced to 86 years in prison
Pakistani scientist ‘Lady Al Qaeda’ sentenced to 86 years in prison for trying to kill U.S. soldiers
Pakistani scientist gets 86 years for attempted murder
Protests erupt over Dr Aafia’s conviction
Aafia’s sentence sparks protests in twin cities
Pakistanis Protest NY Court Ruling on Female Scientist
U.S. Sentence for Pakistani Ignites Anger and Protests
Pakistanis Protest Scientist’s Sentencing In U.S.
Country erupts over Dr Aafia verdict
Rallies slam US court sentence against Aafia
APWA strongly condemns Aafia’s sentence
Nisar asks MPs to stage walkout over Aafia’s conviction
Pakistani foreign minister ‘disappointed’ over scientist’s sentence
Govt chalks out strategy for Aafia’s repatriation
Legal efforts to seek reprieve for Aafia initiated
Aafia Siddiqui

Every year, we give Pakistan billions in humanitarian and military aid and this is the hatred and scorn we get in return.

/make you wonder which side Pakistan is really on, doesn’t it?

Something’s Happening Here, What It Is Ain’t Exactly Clear

Wal-Mart’s glow-in-the-dark mystery

It began in late 2007 as a routine audit. Retail giant Wal-Mart noticed that some exit signs at the company’s stores and warehouses had gone missing.

As the audit spread across Wal-Mart’s U.S. operations, the mystery thickened. Stores from Arkansas to Washington began reporting missing signs. They numbered in the hundreds at first, then the thousands. Last month Wal-Mart disclosed that about 15,800 of its exit signs – a stunning 20 per cent of its total inventory – are lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for at 4,500 facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico.

Poor housekeeping, certainly, but what’s the big deal?

In a word: radiation.

The signs contain tritium gas, a radioactive form of hydrogen. Tritium glows when it interacts with phosphor particles, a phenomenon that has led to the creation of glow-in-the-dark emergency exit signs.

. . .

And what about exposure from thousands of signs dumped near a source of drinking water, or packed with explosives in the back of a truck that has been driven into a crowded building?

“I’m sure thousands of them would create a credible dirty bomb,” says Norm Rubin, director of nuclear research at Energy Probe in Toronto. “Most experts think the main purpose of a dirty bomb is to cause panic, disruption and expensive cleanup rather than lots of dead bodies. A bunch of tritium, especially if oxidized in an explosion, would probably do that job fine.”

ENVIRONMENT: Wal-Mart’s Mysterious Missing Exit Signs: A Tritium Health Risk?

What do Home Depot, the Mormon Church, and the U.S. Coast Guard have in common?

Answer: Radioactivity.

According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the construction retailer, the church denomination, and the guardians of our coastline own hundreds of fluorescent exit signs containing the radioactive gas tritium. So, in fact, do various school districts, retail stores, and federal and state agencies. And if the signs are handled and disposed of improperly, tritium could make its way into our drinking water. The NRC was prompted to step in following Wal-Mart’s recent disclosure that 15,000 tritium exit signs have mysteriously disappeared from its stores nationwide.

On January 16, the NRC sent notices to 61 organizations that own 500 or more tritium signs to check the signs against their records and report any lost or missing signs to the agency. The recipients of the “demand for information” letter include the Department of the Navy, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Postal Service, and the West Point Military Academy, as well as several pharmaceutical, defense, and aviation companies nationwide.

In all, more than two million tritium exit signs are estimated to be in use in the United States. The signs are popular because they do not require electricity and provide emergency light and direction during evacuations.

From 2001 to 2007, Wal-Mart bought 70,000 tritium exit signs to install in its stores and warehouses, according to the NRC. In 2007, after discovering that some signs had disappeared, the company started a nationwide audit of its facilities. The result: a staggering 15,000 signs were lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for.

An NRC advisory states that the tritium signs pose “little or no threat to the public health and safety and do not constitute a security risk.” Others are not so sure. “Fifteen thousand missing tritium exit signs at 20 trillion picocuries each means that 300 quadrillion picocuries of tritium could be making its way into people’s drinking water,” warns David Lochbaum, director of the Nuclear Safety Project at the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Or, nearly four million gallons of water could be contaminated above the EPA’s drinking water standards. And what if 15,000 missing tritium exit signs is a low estimate?”

/certainly nothing good can come of this