The Dominoes Strike Back

It’s Sunni versus Shia as Bahrain’s Suuni rulers have had just about enough of their Shia population’s ongoing uprising and have called on their fellow Sunnis, the Saudis, to help put down the Shia revolt.

Saudi Arabian troops enter Bahrain as regime asks for help to quell uprising

Saudi Arabian troops have crossed into Bahrain after the tiny Gulf kingdom’s ruling family asked for help from neighbouring Sunni Arab states to quell a two-month uprising which threatens their 200-year-old dynasty.

The Saudi capital, Riyadh, said that it had responded to a “security threat” by deploying its troops on the streets of its neighbour. They are to protect strategic sites such as bridges and government buildings. Bahrain’s rulers said the Saudi forces crossed the 16-mile causeway from Saudi Arabia to the island, together a contingent of troops from the Gulf Co-operation Council. Saudi authorities did not give details of the force; some reports estimate it to be 1,000.

Bahrain’s Shia majority has laid siege to the centre of the capital, Manama, since mid-February and has, in recent days, marched on government buildings and palaces.

See also:
GCC Troops Arrive in Bahrain
Saudis send troops into Bahrain to quell protests
Kingdom takes lead to help Bahrain
Thousands of Saudi troops cross into Bahrain after weekend of violence
Foreign troops enter Bahrain as protests continue
Gulf troops enter Bahrain as protests escalate
Saudi Arabia sends troops to troubled Bahrain
Saudi soldiers sent into Bahrain
Saudi troops enter Bahrain
Gulf military force enters Bahrain to help deal with unrest
Gulf security forces enter Bahrain, protests escalate
Next Mideast Flashpoint: Saudis Enter Bahrain
US says told, not consulted, on Saudi Bahrain force
Clinton Expresses ‘Deep Concern’ About Bahrain – US Official
U.S., U.N. urge restraint as forces enter Bahrain to control protests
Iran urges Bahrain to prevent “foreign interference”
‘Saudi intervention is a declaration of war’

Make no mistake about it, the Shia uprising in Bahrain and all the Shia unrest throughout the region is being directly instigated by Iran and her agents.

/if this turmoil somehow escalates into a direct confrontation between Iran and Saudi Arabia, hopefully the Obama/Hillary foreign policy clown posse can keep track of which side the United States’ bread is buttered on

The Dominoes Stop Here

The Saudi “Day of Rage” came up way short on the raging. At least for now, it doesn’t look like the Oil Ticks are in any danger of being overthrown or the West’s primary oil apple cart is in any danger of being upset.

Saudi Arabia ‘day of rage’ protest fizzles

A call for protests in Saudi Arabia that had been talked about for weeks drew only a small number of people Friday, allowing the kingdom to keep at bay the waves of political unrest that have battered the Arab world.

The “day of rage” fizzled in all but restive Eastern province, where the country’s minority Shiite Muslims have been holding demonstrations for weeks. Several hundred protesters turned out in the cities of Hofuf, Awwamiya and Qatif to demand the release of political prisoners, according to news service reports.

But no protests occurred in other major Saudi cities, said Interior Ministry spokesman Maj. Gen. Mansour Turki. “You’ve seen the response of the Saudi people,” Turki said. “This is their response to the call for protest.”

See also:
‘Day of Rage’ a damp squib
Saudi Protests Draw Hundreds
Saudi Capital Calm On Day Protests Called
Saudi Arabia calm on planned ‘Day of Rage’
Saudi Arabia ‘Day of Rage’ begins quietly, markets watch protests closely
‘Day of Rage’ muted in Saudi Arabia
Saudi Police Presence Dampens ‘Day of Rage’
Saudi Arabia show of force stifles ‘day of rage’ protests
Saudi Arabian security forces quell ‘day of rage’ protests
Police presence damps Saudi ‘day of rage’
Strong police presence deters rallies in Saudi capital
Police flood Saudi capital
Saudi police block reform protests
Saudi Activists Fail to Gather Amid Heavy Police Presence
Saudi Arabia quashes planned pro-democracy protests
No threat seen to stability of Kingdom
Why Saudi Arabia is stable amid the Mideast unrest
Foreign Policy: Revolutions Won’t Hit Saudi Arabia

With the Saudis effectively keeping a lid on any protests and Gaddafi now routing and stomping the guts out of the “rebels” in Libya, while the West dithers, it seems as though the current wave of political unrest that has been sweeping the region for the last month or so has just about run it’s course for now. Realistically, there’s almost no more virgin territory left for the “days of rage” movement to keep spreading into.

/now it’s just a matter of watching where all the dust that’s already been kicked up finally settles