Have We Attacked China Yet?

No sooner was it publicly revealed that the United States would now treat damaging cyberattacks by other nations as an act of war, threatening retaliation with conventional weapons, the new, bold, some say foolish, policy, was immediately put to the test.

China Google hackers’ goal: Spying on U.S. Govt.

It’s the second time Google has blamed a major computer hacking scheme on China, reports CBS News correspondent Wyatt Andrews.

This time Google says unknown hackers from Jinan, China, a city with a military command center, stole the personal Gmail passwords of hundreds of senior U.S .government officials.

Google said the hackers’ “goal” was to eavesdrop on the officials — “to monitor the content of the users’ emails.”

That suggestion — of spying — rang alarm bells in the Administration.

“These allegations are very serious,” said Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. “We take them seriously. We’re looking into them.”

See also:
Clinton: Google’s China Hacking Claims ‘Very Serious’
Hillary Clinton says FBI will probe Gmail hacker attack
US Investigating Google Claim of China Hacking
FBI Investigating Google Claim that China Hacked Them
Google breach gives way to diplomatic, high-tech tensions
China Denies Accessing High Profile Gmail Accounts
Google’s groundless accuses hurt global trust on Internet
The Google-China Saga Continues
Admin: Gmail phishers stalked victims for months
Gmail Hack Targeted White House
Cyber war: Google, China in fresh spat over email hacking
Google, what exactly is the China connection for the phishing scare?
Is Google an agent of the US Government? It certainly gives that impression

So far, the U.S. has uncovered a successful espionage phishing expedition, against top level U.S. Government officials, tracked back to a specific Chinese city. Why aren’t we bombing China, isn’t this a perfect situation to show how our new military policy will treat hacking intrusions like this as acts of war? Unfortunately for us, China denies the attack and, as I pointed out yesterday, it’s extremely difficult to be absolutely sure as to the origins of cyberattacks like this, so we do nothing and our brand new policy looks foolish and radiates national weakness.

/instead of making toothless threats to send missile strikes in response to hack attacks, why don’t we just send the Chinese back a nice Stuxnet worm or take down Baidu with a complimentary DoS attack

Advertisements

Rustock Reigned In

Chalk up a big win for the white hats in the ongoing cyberwar against the evil spammers.

Good guys take down notorious Rustock spamming botnet

Rustock, one of the largest and most notorious spam botnets, suddenly fell silent Wednesday and has remained off line.

The takedown of Rustock’s 26 command-and-control servers appears to be the result of a coordinated effort by longstanding anti-spamming groups, the most prominent of which is Spamhaus.org, according to cybersecurity blogger Brian Krebs, who broke the story.

Rustock’s control servers directed the activities of hundreds of thousands of infected PCs in homes and businesses, used primarily to deliver e-mail and social network messaging spam. Rustock is infamous for spreading ads for drugs from unlicensed online pharmacies.

Details of how the takedown was achieved are unclear; Rustock’s control servers were renowned for being nigh impregnable.

Rustock has been around for at least three years, and late last year had doubled its spam output over the previous year; in 2010, Rustock sent out more than 44 billion spam emails per day, accounting for as much as 48% of all spam, and had more than one million bots under its control, according to MessageLabs, Symantec’ messaging security division.

See also:
Rustock Botnet Flatlined with No Spam Activity
Notorious Spamming Botnet, Rustock, Takes a Fall
Rustock botnet’s operations disrupted
Major spam network silenced mid-campaign
Rustock botnet goes quiet again
The World’s Largest Spambot Network Goes Quiet
Prolific Spam Network Is Unplugged
Prolific Spam Network Is Unplugged
Rustock Botnet is Down, But Maybe Not Out
Rustock botnet

It still amazes me how the botnet spammers find hundreds of thousands of computers to infect. If everyone would just keep their software patches up to date, botnets wouldn’t be a problem in the first place. It’s like leaving the front door to your house wide open with a sign that says “burglars welcome”.

/one of the biggest upshots of the Rustock takedown is that if you want to buy Viagra or other erectile dysfunction drugs in the future, you’re going to have to go see your doctor, because the spam offers will hopefully no longer flood your email inbox