We Was Robbed!

What a travesty!


At World Cup, U.S. soccer coach Bob Bradley says disallowed score was ‘good goal’

To the thousands of U.S. supporters at Ellis Park and the millions back home watching Friday’s World Cup match between the United States and Slovenia, a clear injustice had been perpetrated. With no explanation as to why referee Koman Coulibaly had nullified Maurice Edu’s apparent go-ahead goal against Slovenia, rage rang out like a vuvuzela blaring inside a tollbooth.

Like everyone else, the U.S. team was incredulous and incensed. However, in the murky culture of soccer, where officiating decisions are rarely clarified during or after a match, Coach Bob Bradley took the mysterious call almost in stride.

“We’re all accustomed to the fact that, if it is an NFL playoff game and there is a call of some question, there will be a statement by the league from the referees. But FIFA operates differently,” Bradley, a New Jersey native, said of the sport’s international governing body on Saturday.

“Soccer is a different game. There are some aspects of it that are not made 100 percent clear, that seem to add to the discussion about the games. On our end, we get used to that. That’s just how it is sometimes, and then you move on and you get ready for the next game.”

Make no mistake: The U.S. delegation was grumbling after the final whistle of the 2-2 draw and, like many fans around the world, watched replays of the sequence dozens of times in search of answers. But because Coulibaly made a judgment call, FIFA guidelines do not offer a process to formally protest rulings made on the field.

Report: U.S.-Slovenia ref may be banned

According to a Yahoo! Sports report, World Cup referee Koman Coulibaly, whose unexplained call took away the United States’ go-ahead goal in the final minutes of Friday’s game vs. Slovenia, will face an expedited review and could be excluded from the rest of the World Cup.

The story credits a FIFA source as saying Coulibaly’s performance will be reviewed Saturday following a game in which replays showed he had some crucial missed calls and failed to control rough play.

“If he is found to have made a serious mistake, especially one that affected the outcome, then he would be highly unlikely to play any further part in the tournament,” said the source, who is close to senior figures on the refereeing panel. “FIFA is determined to keep refereeing standards high and does not want high-profile mistakes.”

See also:
U.S. Coach Says World Cup Goal Shouldn’t Have Been Disallowed
Donovan frustrated by disallowed goal
For U.S., Only Frustration Is Clear
Roddick fires volley over disallowed US goal
We Wuz Robbed!
Denied winning goal, USA tie Slovenia 2-2: slideshow
Analyst: Why FIFA Won’t Let Ref Explain His Call
FIFA to comment Monday on ref from Mali who ruled out US ‘goal’ against Slovenia
Report: Controversial referee likely to get boot
Gamblers Crying Foul Over Koman Coulibaly Call In World Cup
2010 FIFA World Cup: America’s Ire on Disallowed Goal a Good Thing for Football
Handballs and Bad Calls; Time for FIFA to Add Replay to the World Cup
Did the U.S. get robbed of the winning goal against Slovenia?

For the record, I am not a fan of introducing any type of instant replay into FIFA soccer. Part of the beauty of the game is that the time doesn’t stop, 45 minutes a half, straight through, without interruption. As for Koman Coulibaly, that was his first World Cup referee assignment and it damn well better be his last. He was horrible. However, banning Coulibaly from refereeing further World Cup games is no consolation for his monstrous mistake that may keep the U.S. from advancing.

/oh well, it is what it is, let’s just hope that we can beat Algeria on Wednesday and, for good measure, Slovenia beats or draws with England

Murder Okay, Watching Soccer, Not So Much

Here’s just another classic example of the utter depravity that is the sick and twisted religion of Islam.

Somali militants threaten World Cup TV viewers

Somali militants have threatened football fans they will be publicly flogged – or worse – if they are caught watching the World Cup on TV.

Gangs of Islamists are reported to be patrolling the areas they control looking for people watching games.

Dedicated fans are watching matches in secret, or in the few areas controlled by government forces.

On Saturday militants killed two people as they attacked a house where people were watching a game.

Militant group Hizbul-Islam also arrested 10 others at the house north-east of the capital Mogadishu where fans were watching the game between Argentina and Nigeria.

‘Mad men’

A spokesman for the group, Sheikh Mohamed Abdi Aros said the rest of Somalia should respect their ban on the World Cup.

“We are warning all the youth of Somalia not to dare watch these World Cup matches. It is a waste of money and time and they will not benefit anything or get any experience by watching mad men jumping up and down,” he said.

See also:
World Cup 2010: Somali football fans executed for watching matches
Somali fans executed for watching ‘un-Islamic’ World Cup
World Cup 2010: Somalis killed for watching football
Residents: Islamist militias target Somali World Cup watchers
Risking Life and Limb for Football in Somalia
Somali Insurgents Detain Soccer Fans
Somali Militants Kill Two for Watching World Cup on TV

Okay then, watching soccer is a waste of money and time, but hunting down and murdering soccer fans, that’s Islamic productivity. Yeah, that make sense. Then again, Muslims kill people over cartoons in the name of Allah. Islam is an intrinsically violent religion, so it’s not really a surprise.

/the only marginally redeeming social value in preventing soccer fans from watching the World Cup is that it saves them from the incessant vuvuzela torture