Crazy Dayton Caves

Gee, apparently we can live within our means without raising taxes after all. The stupid part is that Governor Lunatic accepted the GOP proposal that they submitted before the shutdown even started. What a waste of two weeks. At least now, maybe Minnesotans will soon be able to legally fish and buy beer again.

Dayton Agrees to Republican Budget to End Minnesota Shutdown

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican leaders went behind closed doors at 2 p.m. Thursday to discuss a budget proposal with additional conditions that could end the state government shutdown. The trio emerged shortly after 5 p.m. to announce a “framework agreement” has been reached.

The meeting began after the governor sent a letter Thursday morning to House Speaker Kurt Zellers and Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, saying he “reluctantly” agrees to accept the Republican budget proposal from June 30 if it will end the government shutdown.

See also:
Minnesota shutdown to end soon
Minnesota Government To Re-open As Gov. Dayton Caves On Tax Increases
Minnesota Gov. Ready to End Shutdown
Urgent: Dayton to accept last GOP budget offer
Budget Deal to End Minnesota Government Shutdown
Deal In Place To End Minnesota Shutdown
Minnesota government shutdown nears an end, but at what cost?
Minnesota budget deal pushes problem down the road
Doh! Minnesota shutdown could claim beer next
Minnesota shutdown puts MillerCoors beer sales in doubt
No free pass during shutdown; anglers must be licensed
DNR: No Honor System Fishing during Minnesota Shutdown
Some questions — and answers — about Minnesota budget deal and what happens next

Of course, the Republicans didn’t get everything they wanted and they still ended up spending more than their budget limit. But what are you going to do when the Governor, who has mental health issues, is willing to shut down the entire state to satisfy his obsession with raising taxes? And we still have to deal with Crazy Dayton for another 2 1/2 years, lucky us.

Anyway, now that this unfortunate episode is almost behind us, we can move on to more important things, like getting a new Vikings stadium approved. And I swear, If Dayton gets in the way of a new stadium and we end up losing professional football in Minnesota . . . well, he’d better have a real good hiding place.

/and remember, in the land of what might have been, if it weren’t for asshole spoiler little Tom Horner, we would have had a Republican governor to go along with the Republican legislature and Minnesota’s fiscal house would already be in order, without all of Dayton’s drama queen bull[expletive deleted]

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Minnesota, We Have Shutdown

Gee, the Republican legislature, swept into power for the first time in forty years to reduce the size of government, has already passed the largest budget in Minnesota state history.

But petulant Mr. Wouldn’t Even Be Governor but for Tom Horner is obsessed with raising taxes to spend even more, so here we are.

No Talks Expected Before Tuesday for Minnesota Shutdown

Minnesota lawmakers are back in their districts. Some are facing voters for the first time since the government shutdown. That reception may go a long way in determining how long the shutdown will last.

. . .

Reporter: “Do you feel like you went back on a campaign promise of some kind to not shut down government?”

Dayton: “Unfortunately, the two parts of that promise came into conflict with each other because I felt it was ultimately more important to raise the revenue necessary to meet a fair, middle compromise position”

Dayton says a deal fell apart when republicans sought agreement on social policies like abortion.

Kurt Zellers – (R) Minnesota: “To say that this blew up over policy…again, to Amy ‘s point this isn’t true.”

House speaker Kurt Zellers and senate majority leader Amy Koch say the breakdown came over tax increases. They offered non-tax revenue to meet the governor’s demands–and deny they wanted a shutdown.

See also:
Minnesota government shuts down over budget impasse
Minnesota government shuts down over budget woes
Minnesota government shuts down after tax plan torpedoes budget
Minnesota government shutdown puts Tim Pawlenty in spotlight
Minnesota Dem gov fights GOP’s ‘no new tax’ stance
Minnesotans frustrated, angry over state government shutdown
Minnesotans feel pinch of government shutdowns
Minnesota budget row shuts public services
In Minnesota Shutdown, Wider Budget Conflict Comes to a Head
Minnesota shutdown: The shape of things to come?
Lori Sturdevant: Scorched earth politics
Shutdown not seen harming Minnesota’s reputation
Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

Despite the shutdown, life in Minnesota goes on, most people don’t even notice, and every day the shutdown continues the State saves money.

/so hang in there Republicans, this is why you were swept into power, to reduce the size of state government and hold the line on taxes, keep the shutdown going as long as it takes until Dayton caves on his tax raising obsession

Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

The Republicans have already passed a budget, but Governor Dayton won’t sign on to the deal unless it includes tax increases, a demand Republicans will not accept. Who will blink first?

State shutdown would be a leap into unknown

In 19 days, Minnesotans could endure the most wide-reaching government shutdown in state history, with little sense of when it might end.

Across the vast enterprise of state government, agency heads are scrambling to come up with closure plans. State leaders have no real playbook for blinking off such an enormous government machine, so they must wade into an array of wrenching decisions and legal scuffles, knowing they risk turning Minnesota into a national spectacle of partisan gridlock.

“We the citizens will lose immeasurably,” said former Gov. Arne Carlson, adding that Minnesota could become a test case for a wave of shutdowns in politically deadlocked states. “It raises serious questions about where America is going and where Minnesota is going.”

See also:
A shutdown looms, questions linger
State layoff notices sent as questions dominate
Minn. workers warned about shutdown layoffs
Minnesota sends layoff notices to prep for shutdown
Government shutdown would mean hiring freeze
OPINION | A shutdown ain’t nothin’ but a shutdown
No good from shutdown
AFSCME Urges Minn. GOP Lawmakers to Compromise, Avoid Shutdown
New lawmakers willing to negotiate, but not on taxes or total spending
A Q & A about Minnesota budget, possible shutdown

If the Minnesota government shuts down, who will be responsible or, to put it another way, who should take the blame? To find the answer, let’s go back to the 2010 election. Minnesota voters, for the first time in four decades, overwhelmingly swept the Republicans into control of both chambers of the legislature. Mark Dayton, on the other hand, was barely elected Governor by the narrowest of margins after a close recount. The message Minnesotans sent was crystal clear, they want lower taxes and less government spending, period. Minnesota is already one of the most highly taxed states, additional taxes would only make the state less economically competitive.

/so take your tax increase fixation and shove it up your ass Governor Dayton, the people have spoken, the Republicans have passed a budget, and if the Minnesota government shuts down, it’s your [expletive deleted] fault!

Pakistan Circling The Drain

The government is crumbling, prominent politicians are being openly assassinated, and the situation seems to be getting worse by the day.

Pakistan’s Government Scrambles to Survive Coalition Defections

Pakistan’s ruling party is struggling to keep its grip on power a day after a key partner quit the governing coalition, denying it the majority in the national parliament. The prime minister is meeting with opposition politicians in a bid to head off a possible no-confidence vote.

Last month, a small party in the parliament, the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam, announced it was switching to the opposition in parliament and demanded Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani step down.

But the major political setback came Sunday when the second largest party in the ruling coalition, the Muttahida Quami Movement,announced it was also ending its partnership with the government. The move has turned Prime Minister Gilani’s government into a minority coalition in parliament.

Leading Pakistani Politician Killed

A leading politician from Pakistan’s ruling party was gunned down in a wealthy neighborhood of Islamabad Tuesday by a member of his security detail after speaking out against the country’s controversial blasphemy laws, an assassination that highlights the nation’s struggle to contain extremism even among those close to the center of power.

Salmaan Taseer, governor of Punjab, Pakistan’s most-populous province, and a member of the ruling Pakistan People’s Party, died after a member of his security team fired multiple shots into his car at a shopping complex, police said.

His attacker, Malik Mumtaz Qadri, who surrendered to police, admitted he was angered by Mr. Taseer’s opposition to the blasphemy laws, Interior Minister Rehman Malik told local television.

See also:
Pakistan’s prime minister strives to keep government alive
Sharif Tells Pakistan’s Prime Minister to Rein in Prices Or Face Challenge
PML-N gives govt ultimatum to accept its demands
Pakistan’s Government Faces Its Sternest Test Yet
Yet another Pakistani crisis
Pakistan’s political crisis
Death in Islamabad: Pakistani Governor Killed by Own Bodyguard
Salman Taseer assassination points to Pakistani extremists’ mounting power
Escort kills governor Taseer; Pakistan in troubleNews Analysis: Governor’s murder complicates Pakistan’s crisis
Pakistan to bury assassinated governor
Top Pakistani official’s murder adds to Obama’s Afghan woes

Seriously, if you thought Pakistan was less than cooperative with the U.S. Coalition’s war effort in Afghanistan before, just wait and see what happens if the Pakistani government collapses. The current ruling party, the Pakistan People’s Party, are the moderates. Any follow on Pakistani government will surely be much less friendly to U.S. interests in the region, if that’s even possible. And don’t forget, Pakistan has nuclear weapons.

/last one across the border and out of the cesspool, don’t forget to flush

The 2010 Aftermath

Not total victory, but all in all, it was a very good day for Republicans.

After GOP landslide of Election 2010, what next for Obama?

The Republican Party has swept the Democrats out of power in the House and gained seats in the Senate, sending a strong message of voter discontent to President Obama on the economy.

Republicans scored at least a 60-seat gain in the House, the biggest partisan shift since the Democrats lost 75 House seats in 1948. In the Senate, the Republicans fell short of the 10 they needed to take control, and failed to capture their most-hoped-for quarry: the seat of Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D) of Nevada, who defeated tea partyer Sharron Angle by five percentage points. It is the first time in 80 years that the House has changed hands without the Senate following.

The historic wave that makes Rep. John Boehner (R) of Ohio the expected next speaker of the House also hands Mr. Obama the biggest challenge of his political career. Suddenly, the president has no choice but to work toward his unfulfilled 2008 campaign promise of greater bipartisanship. The alternative is gridlock and the appearance of ineffectiveness. But if Obama concedes too much to the Republicans, he risks losing the support of his Democratic base when he runs for reelection in 2012, as expected.

Maybe even more impressive and certainly just as important was the Republican near sweep at the state level. Republicans will now be in charge of redistricting in the majority of states, which will set legislative boundaries for the next ten years.

Forget D.C., look what Republicans won in state legislatures

This is especially important in years ending in ’00 because these newly elected governors and state legislators will (with the exception of California) be the ones redrawing legislative and congressional district lines that will stand for the next decade until the 2020 census. And occupying the governor’s mansion puts that party in control of an immense statewide political apparatus to help its presidential ticket two years hence.

Come January, Republicans will now run crucial governors’ offices in….

…major presidential battleground states like Florida (Rick Scott), Ohio (John Kasich), Pennsylvania (Tom Corbett) and Iowa, where former Gov. Terry Branstad returns. New Mexico voters elected their first female governor, Republican Susana Martinez, a Latino. Sometimes-maligned South Carolina voters chose Nikki Haley, who is not only the state’s first female governor but only the nation’s second of Indian American descent (Louisiana’s Bobby Jindal being the other.) Oklahoma also picked its first female governor, Republican Mary Fallin.

According to the authoritative Stateline.org, the country’s contests for governor and lieutenant governor cost $850 million. Heading into 2012, the GOP will control at least 29 of the 50 governor’s suites.
Perhaps more importantly, the Republican wave at the national level was also felt at the grass-roots level, where Republicans gained control of at least 19 more state legislative chambers, possibly two dozen as vote-counting continues.

The GOP will have a majority in at least 54 of the 99 state legislative chambers, including a minimum of 53% of state legislature seats (about 3,900). That’s the most the party has controlled in 82 years — and up about 700 seats from Monday.

Of course, we didn’t win them all and this one personally sticks in my craw. If it wasn’t for third party spoiler candidate Tom Horner (former Republican), Republican Tom Emmer would already easily be the next Governor of Minnesota. Mark Dayton should send Horner some flowers or candy or a tip or something.

Guv’s race: Long ride, no end in sight

A seismic shift in Minnesota’s political landscape unfolded Wednesday as the most game-changing election in a generation sent Republicans and the DFL scrambling for the last undecided prize — the governor’s office.

DFLer Mark Dayton unofficially leads Republican Tom Emmer by 8,856 votes — a margin so slight that it could trigger a hand-ballot recount for the second election cycle in a row.

Officials began the tedious, nerve-wracking task of locking up ballots, which both parties may guard around the clock.

The day’s events placed the state, yet again, in political suspended animation, awaiting the prospect of another recount brawl that could take months to resolve and get tangled in the courts.

See also:
2010 Elections Exit Poll Analysis: The Political Price of Economic Pain
Election Day 2010 and its aftermath
Exit polls Election 2010
Karl Rove, U.S. Chamber Amass Winning Record in 2010 Elections
Tea Party Top 10 biggest winners and losers
Statehouse wins put GOP in redistricting driver’s seat
Vote 2010 Elections: What’s Your Reaction to Republicans’ Big Win?
With 2010 Behind Us, A Look Ahead To 2012
Republicans celebrate, outline legislative goals
In Social Media Election, The GOP Capitalizes
How will Obama react to GOP gains?

Tuesday’s vote was an absolute thumping repudiation of Obama and the Democrats and their big government, far left agenda. Now that the Republicans have a tight leash on the Democrats, will the Democrats learn to play ball in the poetical center? Will the Democrats learn to at least read the destructive legislation they vote to cram down the throats of the American taxpayers, over the vociferous objections and protestations of the electorate.

/because, if the Democrats don’t learn their lesson this time, they’re going to get thumped even harder in 2012, the American people have spoken and they’ve had enough of Obama and the Democrats’ progressive socialism

Get Out And Vote Republicans!

Especially if you live in New Jersey, let’s try and keep the results out of the margin of fraud.

Christie leads

Chris Christie leads Jon Corzine 47-41 in PPP’s final poll of the New Jersey Governor’s race, with Chris Daggett at 11%.

Corzine had pulled to within a point of Christie on our poll three weeks ago after trailing by as many as 14 points over the summer, but his momentum has stalled since then and Christie’s built his lead back up to 4 points last week and now 6.

But, of course, if you’re a Republican in New Jersey, you already know that a six point lead against a Democrat candidate might not be safe.

Chris Christie’s Next Case: Who Stole My Election?

The race for governor in New Jersey is so close in final polls that it may well end up in a recount — the 1981 election did and was decided by less than 1,800 votes. If there is a recount, you can bet disputes about absentee ballots will loom large. Moreover, if serious allegations of fraud emerge, you can also expect less-than-vigorous investigation by the Obama Justice Department — which showed just how seriously it takes such allegations when it walked away from an open-and-shut voter intimidation case against the New Black Panther Party in Philadelphia earlier this year.

Plenty of reasons exist for suspecting absentee fraud may play a significant role in tomorrow’s Garden State contests. Groups associated with Acorn in neighboring Pennsylvania and New York appear to have moved into the state. An independent candidate for mayor in Camden has already leveled charges that voter fraud is occurring in his city. Meanwhile, the Democratic Party in New Jersey is taking advantage of a new loosely written vote-by-mail law to pressure county clerks not to vigorously use signature checks to evaluate the authenticity of absentee ballots, the only verification procedure allowed.

The state has received a flood of 180,000 absentee ballot requests. On some 3,000 forms the signature doesn’t match the one on file with county clerks. Yet citing concerns that voters would be disenfranchised, Democratic Party lawyer Paul Josephson wrote New Jersey’s secretary of state asking her “to instruct County Clerks not to deny applications on the basis of signature comparison alone.” Mr. Josephson maintained that county clerks “may be overworked and are likely not trained in handwriting analysis” and insisted that voters with suspect applications should be allowed to cast provisional ballots. Those ballots, of course, would then provide a pool of votes that would be subject to litigation in any recount, with the occupant of New Jersey’s highest office determined by Florida 2000-style scrutiny of ballot applications.

The cheaters are making a full court press.

ACORN Aims to Tip New Jersey Election in Corzine’s Favor

Fearing a potentially devastating Democratic loss, the highly controversial Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) group and its affiliated organizations are gearing up to tip the scales and re-elect embattled incumbent in the hard-fought New Jersey gubernatorial race, sources tell Newsmax.

“Acorn is heavily involved in Gov. Jon Corzine’s get-out-the-vote operation, but is maintaining a low profile at the insistence of the Corzine campaign,” Matthew Vadum, senior editor of the conservative Capitol Research Center think tank, tells Newsmax. “If Corzine manages to win reelection, he doesn’t want the victory tainted by his close association with Acorn.”

Wall Street Journal columnist and author John Fund wrote Tuesday that “Plenty of reasons exist for suspecting absentee fraud may play a significant role in tomorrow’s Garden State contests.”

See also:
GOP challenger edges ahead of Corzine in NJ
Bettors Split Between Corzine-Christie in New Jersey
Can Christie Beat the Other Boys In Jersey?
President Obama Robocalls for Gov. Corzine in New Jersey

And don’t forget to vote in New York 23.

Hoffman Leads in Upstate N.Y. House Race, but Many Undecided

In the upstate New York House race that has attracted national attention, Doug Hoffman, the Conservative Party candidate now embraced by the GOP, leads Democrat Bill Owens by 41 percent to 36 percent with 6 percent backing Republican Assemblywoman Dede Scozzafava, who dropped out of the race on Saturday, according to a Siena College poll conducted Nov. 1. Eighteen percent are undecided, The margin of error is 4 points.

The number of undecided voters is now double what it was in Siena’s last poll, when Scozzafava was still in the race.

“Hoffman continues to demonstrate momentum, picking up six points since Scozzafava pulled out,” said Siena’s Steven Greenberg. “It appears, however, that the majority of Scozzafava’s supporters have gone to neither Hoffman nor Owens, but rather into the undecided column.”

Showdown Alarms

The NY-23 special election on Tuesday has the attention of the White House at the highest levels, with White House sources saying that the endorsement of Democrat Bill Owens by “Republican” Dede Scozzafava came only after a call from White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel asking that she throw her support behind the Democrat.

NY 23, are you going to let the Obama White House control your Republican candidates?

See also:
GOP watch: Chaos in NY-23
Congressional Roundup: NY-23 edition
Last-minute NY 23rd poll: Conservative Doug Hoffman surges, but …

Ain’t but one Republican still in the NY 23 race, vote accordingly.

And, if you live in Virginia, you can phone the win in, but you still have to actually get off your collective Republican asses and vote for McDonnell, nuke the election from orbit, just to make sure.

/finally, if you’re a Democrat, remember, you get to vote on Wedbesday, 11/4/09