How Stupid Is This?

If you were ever wondiering who was the king of the dumbasses, I think we have a winner.

His Hindsight Is 20-20

Implanting a camera in the back of his head as part of an art project may have granted a New York University photography professor, Wafaa Bilal, a certain notoriety in the last several weeks, but it has robbed him of something else: dinner-party invitations.

Concerned about the intrusion of his head-camera, which is rigged to broadcast online a live stream of images snapped automatically at one-minute intervals, some of Mr. Bilal’s acquaintances have removed him from their guest lists, he said Thursday in his first newspaper interview about the project.

But he is not offended: “If people don’t accept it, then I don’t want the invitation,” Mr. Bilal said. “It’s part of me, and that’s the idea.”

An assistant arts professor at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, Mr. Bilal was commissioned to implant the camera for the period of one year by a new museum in Qatar. The museum, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, will also display a live stream of the photos when it opens Dec. 30.

See also:
New York professor installs camera in head
NYU professor installs camera in his skull
The NYU professor with a camera in his skull
Art Prof Lets World Peer Through His Surgically Embedded 3rd Eye
Man Attaches Cyborg Camera Implant to His Skull
New Video Of Cyborg Professor With a Camera on the Back of His Head!
3rd eye: NYU artist gets camera implanted in head
In the Name of Art, Wafaa Balil is a Walking Tripod
Artist has camera surgically inserted so he can have ‘eyes at the back of his head’ for a year
Artist has camera attached to his head in the name of art
New York University professor embeds camera into head for art project
Website for ‘3rd I’
3rdI

I’ll bet $100 that he’s an Obama voter.

/and remember kids, don’t try this at home

Building Organs From Scratch

They’re getting really close now, this is exciting stuff.

Growing lungs in a lab: researchers move closer to goal

Now two research groups have made major strides in attacking the problem. One has successfully engineered a lung that can sustain a living rat and the other has created a lung-mimicking device for toxicology studies that acts more like a real lung than any earlier efforts, the groups reported Thursday in the journal Science.

One report brings closer the day when artificial lungs might be grown for human transplants; the other offers a method for testing the effects of toxic chemicals on lungs that is cheaper and more humane than animal tests and more reliable than ones done in test tubes, scientists said.

In work colleagues described as daring, a team led by Dr. Laura Niklason at Yale University grew rat lungs almost from scratch.

Because lungs are so complicated, the group used a scaffold-based approach — they took lungs from adult rats and dissolved away all the cells, leaving behind a fibrous lung “skeleton.”

They seeded these scaffolds with lung cells from newborn rats and — through careful coaxing that included incubation in a “lung bioreactor” that mimicked the fetal lung environment — produced what appeared to be functional lungs.

They then implanted the lungs into four live rats and showed that the engineered lungs were 95% as efficient as natural ones.

The same methodology had been used to successfully create beating rat and pig hearts in 2008 — although in those cases, the organs were never transplanted into living animals.

“It’s exciting to see that it’s not just about [the] heart; it works in other organs and tissues too,” said Doris Taylor of the University of Minnesota, who conducted the pioneering heart work. “It really reinforces the belief that these scaffolds are smart. They know how to tell cells what to do, where to go and how to behave.”

There are still kinks in the process: A few hours after rats received the lungs, tiny blood clots began to form, probably because of bare spots on the scaffold. “It’s pointed out to us what worked, but it’s also pointed out to us what needs to be made better,” Niklason said.

See also:
Breakthrough: Lab Lungs Live and Breathe
Mouse Lungs Grown From Stem Cells At U Of M
Scientists Build a Rat Lung
Breathing lungs, straight from the lab
N.E. researchers create functioning lung tissue
UTMB grows lungs from ‘skeletons’
Engineered Mouse Lungs Function Well in Laboratory Study
Scientists make progress in growing new human lungs
Building Living, Breathing Lungs In The Lab
Breakthrough In Lung Transplant Biomedicine
Lung-on-a-chip points to alternative to animal tests
A Chip Takes Its First Breath

/as Glenn Reynolds would say, faster please