Attack Of The Lobate Scarps

Evil lobate scarps are shrinking the moon, run for your lives!

The Moon Has Shrunk, and May Still Be Contracting

The moon has been shrinking, suggest scientists who spotted relatively young geological features that form when a planetary body cools and contracts.

Called lobate scarps, the features are made when land on one side of a geologic fault line is thrust upward, creating a slanting wall that can be several hundred feet high and several miles long.

“If you were walking up to one of these landforms, you would see basically what looks like a stair-step in the landscape,” said study co-author Thomas Watters of the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

“It would be steep in the front on the scarp face itself and then gently sloping on the backside.”

The Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions photographed about 70 lobate scarps near the moon’s equator. (Read the original National Geographic magazine coverage of the Apollo 11 moon landing.)

But NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter found 14 more scarps in several, widespread locations, suggesting the thrust faults are globally distributed across the moon’s surface. (See some of the first moon pictures from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.)

Watters and colleagues think the scarps formed as the inside of the moon cooled from its original, molten state.

“As the interior cools, it contracts, and the crust of the moon has to adjust to the reduced volume,” Watters said. “That causes this breaking of the crust into these small faults.” Lobate scarps form when the contracting crust puts pressure along the fault planes.

See also:
The Incredible Shrinking Moon
The Moon Is Shrinking
New images indicate moon may be shrinking
Images Show A Shrinking Moon
Over a Billion Years, Scientists Find, the Moon Went Through a Shrinking Phase
The moon is shrinking, a tiny bit
The Moon is shrinking, says astronomers
Center for Earth and Planetary Studies
Center for Earth and Planetary Studies
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

Obviously, this Moon shrinkage was caused by anthropogenic global warming on Earth.

/or those damn, racist Tea Party Teabaggers, take your pick

There’s Water On That Thar Moon!

NASA Briefing To Reveal Evidence of Water on the Moon – Lots of It

Reliable sources report that there will be a press conference at NASA HQ at 2:00 pm this Thursday featuring lunar scientist Carle Pieters from Brown University.

The topic of the press briefing will be a paper that will appear in this week’s issue of Science magazine wherein results from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) aboard Chandrayaan-1 will be revealed.

The take home message: there is a lot of water on the Moon.

Water discovered on moon?: “A lot of it actually”

Speculation is rife among space scientists that the quest for water on the moon may have reached a climactic end with the discovery of “a lot of water” by an instrument on board Chandrayaan-I.

A report by the online space news portal, Space Ref, says this discovery, made by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) on board the Indian mission, will be the subject of a press conference, to be addressed by Carle Pieters, planetary geologist and principal investigator of the instrument, at the NASA headquarters on Thursday.

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), an imaging spectrometer, was one of the 11 instruments on board Chandrayaan-I that came to a premature end on August 29. M3 was aimed at providing the first mineral map of the entire lunar surface.

Hinting at this exciting development, a recent report published by Nature News says: “Results soon to be published… will show detailed spectra confirming that, indeed, the polar regions of the moon are chockfull of water-altered minerals.”

Lunar scientists have for decades contended with the possibility of water repositories. They are now increasingly “confident that the decades-long debate is over,” the report says. “The moon, in fact, has water in all sorts of places; not just locked up in minerals, but scattered throughout the broken-up surface, and, potentially, in blocks or sheets of ice at depth.” The results from the NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter are also “offering a wide array of watery signals.

NASA Expected to Reveal Moon Mineral Mapper Shows A Lot of Water on the Moon

Water on the moon should be used to supply fuel for fuel depots in space to enable colonization and lower cost access to space.

See also:
Report: NASA to confirm presence of water on the moon
Did Chandrayaan find water on Moon’s surface?
Did Chandrayaan-1 confirm ice on the Moon?
LRO, Chandrayaan-1 Team Up For Unique Search for Water Ice
India’s Chandrayaan-1 and NASA join hands to search for water on the moon
Chandrayaan-1 (M3)
Chandrayaan-1
Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3
Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)
Back To The Moon

It’s too bad we can’t send men back to the moon to take advantage of this wonderful discovery because Obama is spending the $50 billion NASA needs to pay back his union buddies. What a corrupt, shameful shame.

/Obama Says, No Moon For You!

Back To The Moon

NASA heads back to the moon

Nearly 5-1/2 years after former President Bush decided to send US astronauts back to the moon by 2020, America is set to launch the first mission supporting that goal.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and a companion spacecraft are set for launch Thursday aboard an Atlas 5 rocket. The $504-million mission is scheduled to take off as early as 5:12 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

After a four-day journey, and another 66 days of testing and easing the spacecraft into its final orbit, the LRO will circle the moon some 31 miles above its surface, building the most detailed atlas yet of Earth’s companion. The data will help planners figure out where to send astronauts when it’s time to put boots back on the lunar surface.

After the first year, the orbiter will continue working for an additional year or two with emphasis on answering basic questions about the moon – about the composition of the moon’s “seas” and highlands, and its geologic history written in the rocks exposed in crater walls.

“This is exploration and science working together,” says Mike Wargo, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) chief lunar scientist.

The orbiter will gather images of objects as small as 18 inches across, build contour maps of the lunar surface accurate to within about three feet, and map surface temperatures at different latitudes and through the moon’s subtle seasonal changes. It will gather information on radiation hazards from the sun, from cosmic rays from deep space, and from energetic neutrons those rays kick up when they strike the lunar surface. It will also map the distribution of surface minerals.

From the standpoint of establishing lunar outposts, a key task is hunting for water ice that may lurk in the permanent, frigid darkness at the bottom of craters at the moon’s poles. Past spacecraft have yielded evidence of water. But the signs have been vague.

That’s why the mission includes some fall fireworks. In October, the orbiter’s companion craft, the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), is destined for a lunar smack-down. The craft – actually a guidance-and-instrument package mated to the Atlas rocket’s upper stage – will steer the stage toward a head-on collision with the bottom of a polar crater. One NASA scientist has likened it to a VW bug pushing a school bus.

At the right moment, the package will release the spent upper stage and follow it down, measuring the results as the collision kicks material from the dark crater floor back into sunlight. Scientists say they expect the plume to extend to some four miles above the crater rim. Shortly after the upper stage augers in, the guidance package also will end up as rubble on the crater’s floor.

“This is the crescendo event,” says Dan Andrews, the project manager for LCROSS.

Space-based telescopes, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, India’s lunar orbiter, and several ground-base observatories will try to tease out the material’s composition with an eye toward capturing the signatures of water ice, if it’s there. The event also is likely to be visible to amateur astronomers with the right-sized telescope.


See also:
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
En Route to Moon!
Mission Overview
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: NASA Returns To The Moon With First Lunar Launch In A Decade
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
USGS Astrogeology Returns to its Lunar Roots With LRO
Public Can ‘Participate’ In NASA’s Lunar Mission
Moon orbiter faces many risks
NASA Mission to Survey Moon for Return of Astronauts
Moonstruck: Tagalong Probe to Blast Moon in Search for Water
Catherine Peddie, Deputy Project Manager
ASK Talks with Cathy Peddie
Atlas V: Countdown 101
Atlas V

/and hey, coming in at a measly $504 million, the cost of the LRO/LCROSS mission is statistically insignificant compared to the tens of billions we’ve wasted on bailing out Chrysler, GM, and the UAW, and the LRO/LCROSS mission is infinitely more worthwhile