Duqu Shoots, It Scores!

Duqu goes in where Stuxnet has been . . .

Iran claims defence computer systems hit by another ‘supervirus’

Anti-virus experts last month identified a virus called “Duqu” that they said shared properties with the now famous “Stuxnet” worm, which spread across the world but is thought to have been successfully targeted at the nuclear programme’s centrifuges, the devices that enrich uranium to create nuclear fuel.

It was not clear on Monday from the Iranian statement whether Duqu had also struck nuclear facilities, but it was the first admission of damage.

“We are in the initial phase of fighting the Duqu virus,” Gholamreza Jalali, the head of Iran’s civil defence programme, said. “The final report which says which organisations the virus has spread to and what its impacts are has not been completed yet.

See also:
Iran Working to Control Duqu Virus Attack
Iran detects Duqu virus in system
Duqu Virus Detected in Iran
Iran says has detected Duqu computer virus
Iran finds Duqu-infected systems
Duqu infiltrates Iranian networks
Iran admits Duqu attack; denies report its nukes are for war, not power
Iran detects Duqu infections
Iran wrestles Duqu malware infestation
Security researcher says Iran to blame for its own Duqu infections
Iran claims Duqu virus aimed at sabotaging its nuclear sites
‘Duqu virus aiming at Iran’s nuclear sites’
Iranians say nuke project hit by new computer virus
Iran produces antivirus software against new worm
Iran Develops Software to Thwart Duqu Virus Attack
‘Iran can thwart Duqu spyware’
Iran says Duqu malware under ‘control’
Iran says it has ‘controlled’ Duqu malware attack
Beyond Stuxnet

Duqu is the, arguably more sophisticated, follow on to Stuxnet, which took control of Iranian uranium enrichment centrifuges and spun them at speeds well beyond their design capability until they failed. Stuxnet was an offensive weapon. Unlike Stuxnet, Duqu is, at least so far, strictly a reconnaissance tool, gathering and reporting back information on systems related to Iran’s nuclear program, preparing the battlespace as a prelude to a future attack if you will. Whether the next attack will be another
Stuxnet like cyberstrike or physically digging in the Iranian dirt is a layman’s guess. One thing’s for sure, the next attack on Iran’s nuclear program is coming and Iran won’t be able to stop it.

Iran claims to have thwarted Duqu but, then again, they said the same thing about Stuxnet and Stuxnet blew out their centrifuges. Anyway, if Iran is just now admitting that they’ve been infected by Duqu, Duqu may have already accomplished its reconnaissance mission and gone dormant. Whatever information Iran releases publicly is pretty much a lie, propaganda, you can safely assume that whenever they acknowledge their nuclear program has been compromised, the damage is much worse than they’re letting on.

And remember, whether it’s another cyberattack or airstrikes against Iranian nuclear facilities, all it does is buy us time. Stuxnet set the Iranians back, but it didn’t deter them. Destroying some of their nuclear facilities won’t deter them either, in fact, it’ll probably make them even more defiant. The only endgame that will bring closure is regime change. And think about it, if we do that, we’ve just resolved 70+% of the world’s instability problems.

/my vote is for a comprehensive, all hands on deck, leave no stone unturned, decapitation campaign, Mullahs and the Republican Guard gots to live and work somewhere and I bet we have the GPS coordinates

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Super Bot

This sure looks like a nasty piece of work.

Massive botnet ‘indestructible,’ say researchers

A new and improved botnet that has infected more than four million PCs is “practically indestructible,” security researchers say.

“TDL-4,” the name for both the bot Trojan that infects machines and the ensuing collection of compromised computers, is “the most sophisticated threat today,” said Kaspersky Labs researcher Sergey Golovanov in a detailed analysis Monday.

“[TDL-4] is practically indestructible,” Golovanov said.

. . .

TDL-4 infects the MBR, or master boot record, of the PC with a rootkit — malware that hides by subverting the operating system. The master boot record is the first sector — sector 0 — of the hard drive, where code is stored to bootstrap the operating system after the computer’s BIOS does its start-up checks.

Because TDL-4 installs its rootkit on the MBR, it is invisible to both the operating system and more, importantly, security software designed to sniff out malicious code.

But that’s not TDL-4’s secret weapon.

What makes the botnet indestructible is the combination of its advanced encryption and the use of a public peer-to-peer (P2P) network for the instructions issued to the malware by command-and-control (C&C) servers.

See also:
TDL4 – Top Bot
Sophisticated TDL-4 Botnet Has 4.5 Million Infected Zombies
‘Indestructible’ rootkit enslaves 4.5m PCs in 3 months
TDL-4 creates 4.5 million PC ‘indestructible’ botnet
Security Researchers Discover the Mother of All Botnets
TDL-4: The ‘indestructible’ botnet?
There’s a Botnet Called TDL-4 That’s Virtually Indestructable
‘Indestructible’ Botnet Enslaves 4.5 Million PCs
‘Indestructible’ Zombie PC Botnet Borrows Exploit From Israeli, U.S. Cyberweapon
Have cybercriminals created the perfect botnet — undetectable and indestructible?

If you ever needed a reason and reminder to keep your operating system, anti-virus, and anti-spywware software patched and up to date, this would be a good one.

/remember, if you’re not part of the solution, you’re potentially part of the problem

We’re Number One, We’re Number One!

This is why it’s important to keep your computer security up to date.

US Ranks First for Bot-Infected Computers and Spam Output

According to data gathered by Microsoft’s Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT), the United States had the highest number of computers infected with botnet malware, during the first half of 2010.

Botnet are armies of infected computers, which connect to remote command and control (C&C) servers and listen to instructions from attackers.

Botnets can serve a variety of criminal activities, but the largest ones are primarily used to send spam.

According to a recent report from Symantec, during the first half of the year, 90% of the daily spam traffic was generated by five to six million compromised computers.

In the latest edition of its Security Intelligence Report (SIR), Microsoft reveals that during Q2, MSRT has cleaned 2,148,169 bot infections from US computers.

That’s four times more than in the second country on the list, Brazil, with 511,002. Spain (485,603), Korea (422,663) and Mexico (364,554) complete the top five.

“Unsurprisingly, the list is dominated by populous locations with large numbers of computer users, led by the United States and Brazil,” says Microsoft.

However, there are at least two regions with large numbers of computers that do not dominate the list – China, which finished 8th, and Russia, 9th.

See also:
Featured Intelligence – Battling Botnets
USA Is Still #1 In Botnets
United States Ranked Number One for Relaying Spam, Sophos Reports
Report: United States is world’s top spammer
US Has Most Botnet-infected PC’s
Microsoft Report: 2 Million US PCs Part of Botnets
Microsoft: Over 2 million U.S. PCs caught in botnets
Millions Of US Computers Completely Pwned By Botnets
Microsoft: Your Computer Could be One of 2.2 Million Infected Botnet PCs
Microsoft: Botnets are the ‘launch pad of cybercrime’

If you’re not sure whether you have an infected computer, run Microsoft’s Malicious Software Removal Tool (MRT). Go to Start/Run and then type in “mrt”.

/if you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem

Let’s Play ATM Or Slot Machine?

Barnaby Jack is at it again.

Researcher Demonstrates ATM ‘Jackpotting’ at Black Hat Conference

In a city filled with slot machines spilling jackpots, it was a “jackpotted” ATM machine that got the most attention Wednesday at the Black Hat security conference, when researcher Barnaby Jack demonstrated two suave hacks against automated teller machines that allowed him to program them to spew out dozens of crisp bills.

The demonstration was greeted with hoots and applause.

In one of the attacks, Jack reprogrammed the ATM remotely over a network, without touching the machine; the second attack required he open the front panel and plug in a USB stick loaded with malware.

Jack, director of security research at IOActive Labs, focused his hack research on standalone and hole-in-the-wall ATMs — the kind installed in retail outlets and restaurants. He did not rule out that bank ATMs could have similar vulnerabilities, though he hasn’t yet examined them.

The two systems he hacked on stage were made by Triton and Tranax. The Tranax hack was conducted using an authentication bypass vulnerability that Jack found in the system’s remote monitoring feature, which can be accessed over the Internet or dial-up, depending on how the owner configured the machine.

Tranax’s remote monitoring system is turned on by default, but Jack said the company has since begun advising customers to protect themselves from the attack by disabling the remote system.

To conduct the remote hack, an attacker would need to know an ATM’s Internet IP address or phone number. Jack said he believes about 95 percent of retail ATMs are on dial-up; a hacker could war dial for ATMs connected to telephone modems, and identify them by the cash machine’s proprietary protocol.

The Triton attack was made possible by a security flaw that allowed unauthorized programs to execute on the system. The company distributed a patch last November so that only digitally signed code can run on them.

Both the Triton and Tranax ATMs run on Windows CE.

Using a remote attack tool, dubbed Dillinger, Jack was able to exploit the authentication bypass vulnerability in Tranax’s remote monitoring feature and upload software or overwrite the entire firmware on the system. With that capability, he installed a malicious program he wrote, called Scrooge.

Scrooge lurks on the ATM quietly in the background until someone wakes it up in person. It can be initiated in two ways — either through a touch-sequence entered on the ATM’s keypad or by inserting a special control card. Both methods activate a hidden menu that allows the attacker to spew out money from the machine or print receipts. Scrooge will also capture track data embedded in bank cards inserted into the ATM by other users.

To demonstrate, Jack punched the keys on the typed to call up the menu, then instructed the machine to spit out 50 bills from one of four cassettes. The screen lit up with the word “Jackpot!” as the bills came flying out the front.

To hack the Triton, he used a key to open the machine’s front panel, then connected a USB stick containing his malware. The ATM uses a uniform lock on all of its systems — the kind used on filing cabinets — that can opened with a $10 key available on the web. The same key opens every Triton ATM.

Two Triton representatives said at a press conference after the presentation that its customers preferred a single lock on systems so they could easily manage fleets of machines without requiring numerous keys. But they said Triton offers a lock upgrade kit to customers who request it — the upgraded lock is a Medeco pick-resistant, high-security lock.

. . .

Jack said that so far he’s examined ATMs made by four manufacturers and all of them have vulnerabilities. “Every ATM I’ve looked at allows that ‘game over.’ I’m four for four,” he said at the press conference. He wouldn’t discuss the vulnerabilities in the two ATMs not attacked on Wednesday because he said his previous employer, Juniper Networks, owns that research.

Jack said his aim in demonstrating the hacks is to get people to look more closely at the security of systems that are presumed to be locked down and impenetrable.

See also:
Bunker-busting ATM attacks show security holes
Hacker breaks into ATMs, dispenses cash remotely
Security researcher demonstrates ATM hacking
Black Hat: Hacker Tricks ATMs Into Raining Cash
Researcher shows how to hack ATMs with “Dillinger” tool
Armed with exploits, ATM hacker hits the jackpot
Powered By Microsoft Windows
IOActive Labs
Tranax Technologies
Triton Systems

All your ATMs are belong to Barnaby Jack!

/I’ll bet Barnaby is really well paid and gets plenty of job offers from the Black Hats as well as the White Hats

Patchapalooza Tuesday

It’s a triple witching day for computer patches.

Microsoft, Adobe, and Oracle Patch Nearly 100 Vulnerabilities

It’s a busy day for IT administrators and information security professionals. Not only is today Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday for the month of April, it is also the day of Adobe’s quarterly security updates. In total, there are 40 vulnerabilities being addressed today–many of them rated as critical and exposing systems to potential remote exploits.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday

A Microsoft spokesperson e-mailed the following “Today, as part of its routine monthly security update cycle, Microsoft is releasing 11 security bulletins to address 25 vulnerabilities: five rated Critical, five rated Important and one rated Moderate. This month’s release affects Windows, Microsoft Office, and Microsoft Exchange. Additionally, the Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) was updated to include Win32/Magania.”

Qualys CTO Wolfgang Kandek noted in his blog post “Microsoft’s patch release for April contains 11 bulletins covering 25 vulnerabilities. The bulletins address a wide array of operating systems and software packages, IT administrators with a good inventory of their installed base will have an easier time to evaluating which machines need patches.”

“The critical Microsoft WinVerifyTrust signature validation vulnerability can be used to really enhance social engineering efforts,” said Joshua Talbot, security intelligence manager, Symantec Security Response in an e-mailed statement. “Targeted attacks are popular and since social engineering plays such a large role in them, plan on seeing exploits developed for this vulnerability.”

Talbot continued “It allows an attacker to fool Windows into thinking that a malicious program was created by a legitimate vendor. If a user begins to download an application and they see the Windows’ notification telling them who created it, they might think twice before proceeding if it’s from an unfamiliar source. This vulnerability allows an attacker to force Windows to report to the user that the application was created by any vendor the attacker chooses to impersonate.”

Andrew Storms, director of security operations for nCircle offered this analysis “More movies and more malware: that’s what we’ve got to look forward to on the Internet. Microsoft is patching critical bugs in Windows Media Player and Direct Show this month–both of these bugs lend themselves to online video malware. If you put these fixes together with Apple’s recent patch of Quicktime, it’s pretty obvious that attackers are finding a lot of victims through video.”

nCircle’s Tyler Reguly points out that there is also a greater message to be learned from the patches. “As an avid Windows XP user, I’m leaning more and more towards making the jump to Windows 7; with the added security it just makes sense. Looking at the top two vulnerabilities (MS10-027 and MS10-026), my Windows XP systems are vulnerable to both, yet my Windows 7 laptop isn’t affected by either of them. The newer operating system just makes sense.”

Adobe Quarterly Update

As if eleven security bulletins fixing 25 different vulnerabilities wasn’t enough, IT administrators must also address the critical updates released today from Adobe. nCircle’s Storms points out that “Every one of the 15 bugs can be used for remote code execution. Given the increase in the number of attacks that use Adobe PDF files, all users are strongly urged to upgrade immediately.”

Storms added “In stark contrast to Microsoft’s patch process, Adobe’s security bulletin information lacks details, especially critical information about potential workarounds. For enterprises that have a long test cycle, it can take weeks or even months to roll out updates. With no workaround information, Adobe leaves their enterprise customers vulnerable and security teams everywhere frustrated and annoyed.”

Andrew Brandt, lead threat research analyst with Webroot, warns “What’s more, they should be aware that Foxit Reader–which also reads PDFs–is actually more vulnerable.”

It is also worth noting that Adobe has rolled out its new update system which it has been beta testing over the past couple of months. Users can now configure Adobe software to automatically install updates, enabling security patches to be applied without requiring any user intervention.

Don’t Forget Oracle

Wait, there’s more! Not wanting to be left out of the patch day festivities, Oracle has also unleashed its own deluge of updates–more than Microsoft and Adobe combined.

There is a little bit of good news, though. Very few organizations will actually be impacted by every single one of the disclosed vulnerabilities. Qualys’ Kandek points out “This is a big release for Microsoft, addressing a wide selection of software. IT administrators probably will not have all of the included software packages and configurations installed in their environment and therefore will need to install only a subset of the 11 bulletins.”

The same logic holds true for Oracle and, to a lesser extent Adobe–although Adobe Reader is fairly ubiquitous. Have fun!

See also:
Microsoft, Adobe, Oracle offer fixes in big Patch Tuesday
Patch Tuesday: Microsoft safeguards video, Adobe secures PDFs
Microsoft Patch Tuesday Fixes 5 Critical Flaws
Microsoft Targets Media Flaws In April Patches
Microsoft blocks ‘movies-to-malware’ attacks
Microsoft Releases Multiple Updates; Vista SP0 Support Ends
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for April 2010
New Adobe Auto-Updater Debuts On Super (Patch) Tuesday
Adobe Patches Acrobat/Reader Vulnerabilities, Updates on Updating
Security update available for Adobe Reader and Acrobat

/so, you know the drill people, get busy downloading those patches, hope you’re not on dial up!

Cyberwar Fail

Okay, so it was pretend, could have been more realistic, and adding the natural disasters was a bit much, but today’s Cyber ShockWave proved a point, the United States is not ready to defend herself against an organized, large scale cyber-attack. The Chinese, Russians, and a myriad of other state and criminal entities probe our cyber-defenses 24 hours a day, seven days a week, looking for weaknesses. If one or more of these actors decided to launch a coordinated, sustained cyber-assault, we could be brought down to our economic knees in a crippling world of infrastructure cyberhurt.

Report: The Cyber ShockWave and its aftermath

When it comes to the protection of the nation’s infrastructure, the government is lacking in several areas. While they have the ability to act offensively, if they know who the enemy is, the trick is to collect enough information and retaliate without violating domestic and foreign policy and law. The Tech Herald was in Washington D.C. on Tuesday to witness Cyber ShockWave. Here’s what we walked away with.

What happened?

Cyber ShockWave started with a vulnerability in the operating systems used by various Smartphones. Thanks to a malicious application, celebrating the NCAA’s March Madness, Spyware was loaded onto Smartphones that included a keylogger and data intercept component. The application was then used to funnel millions of dollars to banks overseas. From there, the data and money snatching application morphs, and the malicious application turns the infected devices into bots and adds them to a telecommunications botnet.

The bots start to download videos showing The Red Army. The downloads and resulting spread of the video result flood the data networks of the major carriers, and slow them to a crawl before crippling them altogether. After that, the Malware on the Smartphones starts to replicate, thanks to sync programs linking information from the phone to a computer. Now that the computers are infected, the ISPs face the same issue the telecoms faced. In the end, both communications systems are crippled.

If this wasn’t enough, weather patterns resulting in a heat wave and hurricanes stress the electrical system. This is where things go south, on a major scale. A hurricane wrecks the petroleum refining and natural gas processing centers, and a stressed electrical grid is hurt more by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and what is assumed to be a Malware attack on the Secure Trade power trading platform.

Both incidents are deemed critical, and the former top US officials debated how to respond for most of the event. The problem is that by the end of the debates, during both sessions, there were no real answers.

Behold the confusion that is Cyber ShockWave

Can we nationalize the U.S. power system? Should the National Guard be called out? The FBI reports that they have traced the services used in the March Madness application to Russia, is retaliation called for? Two IEDs were detonated in two different power facilities, is it terrorism? According to a GNN (the news source for media information during the event), there was a cyber component to the electrical outage, later assumed to be related to patches on the Secure Trade software. Was this the work of an insider? These were the topics of note, and the confusion only led to more questions and few answers.

The downside to the ShockWave, as it were, is that there were just too many levels of attack at the same time. The Cyber ShockWave exercise was to create a possible attack scenario, but not one that is total chaos. However, by adding the botnet side to the telecom attack, adding in natural disasters as well as potential terrorism on and offline, they added too much to the “Perfect Storm” that they kept referring to it as.

The malicious application causing harm to telecom and ISP networks is one scenario that is highly likely, as more and more applications make it to market and more and more people switch to Smartphones. The odds of this happening at the same time that the power grid is attacked, and a hurricane kills off oil and gas production, is simply too high to compute.

The point of it all

The main point to take away from Cyber ShockWave, at least how we see it, is that there needs to be a solid level of cooperation inside the government first, and then after that, between the government and private sector. There is no “I” in team, and when it comes to protecting the assets within the backbone of the Internet, both private and government entities have a lot to look after.

One interesting point came up when debating the Russian server, the one the FBI said was linked to the telecom attacks. Why doesn’t the government simply shut it down? The reason is that doing so could be considered an act of war. No one knows, because there is no policy or precedence of such an action.

The mirror side to this would be the question, what if the Russian server was a jumping point to a server in the U.S.? If so, can we shut it down then? What would be the reasoning? While killing a server in a foreign country could be perceived as an act of aggression, doing so on our own soil could be a violation of various laws, unless a state of emergency is ordered. Once that happens, according to the panel, the President has a good deal of leeway.

There are few limits to what the government can do in response to a threat to national security. What limits that exist are those enforced by policy and U.S. law. What this means is that while there were several ideas passed around, many of them are without precedence, so they couldn’t be acted on.

For example there was a patch for the Smartphones, one that would fix the Malware issue. Yet, only 50-percent of consumers applied it. To prevent further attacks to the telecommunications system, you can ask the people to stop using phones, or simply force them to stop using them by turning them off. If the issue was forced, and the government did something to turn the phones off, then there would be serious consequences to deal with later.

In the end, the Bipartisan Policy Center, who put Cyber ShockWave together, had hoped that the gaps existing within the law and government policy related to cybercrime and cyberattacks would be exposed. The got their wish, as gaps in both areas were exposed. But when it comes to balance between the private and government sectors and security, it takes more than policy to make it work.

It would have added a ton of weight to the exercise if there was some sort of consultation with energy companies or telecom representatives. They were absent during the mock attacks, and their absence was felt when you consider that by the time the President was “briefed”, there was no solid plan of action as to how to deal with and recover from the incidents.

There were some smart and skilled people on the panel. Yet, the scripting made the panel come off as clueless when it came to the reach, intelligence, and overall skill of foreign attackers. The current cyber capacities of the various international terrorist groups were left completely off the table.

Overall, the Cyber ShockWave was more media hype than actual intelligence and insight. We had hoped to see some of the political heavyweights on the panel act with their full capacity and experience, but they either couldn’t or opted not to. If anything, the federal employees who attended learned that managing IT in the public world, and dealing with threats there, is nothing like attempting the same feat within the federal government.

See also:
U.S. Isn’t Prepared for Massive Cyber Attack, Ex-Officials Say
War game reveals U.S. lacks cyber-crisis skills
In a doomsday cyber attack scenario, answers are unsettling
Washington Group Tests Security in ‘Cyber ShockWave’
US networks and power grid under (mock) cyber-attack
Cyberattack simulation highlights vulnerabilities
Former officials war-game cyberattack
Former Government Officials Gather to Rehearse Cyberwar
Former top U.S. officials hold cyberattack exercise
Cyber ShockWave cripples computers nationwide (sorta)
Cyber Shockwave : Cyber-Attack to Test Government Response
Is The U.S. Ready For A Cyberwar?
25 ways to better secure software from cyber attacks
It’s Your Cyberspace Too, So Take Care Of It
Bipartisan Policy Center

/remember, this was only a test, had this been an actual emergency we would have been seriously [expletive deleted]

The Cyberwar Rages 24/7

Corporations’ cyber security under widespread attack, survey finds

Around the world, corporations’ computer networks and control systems are under “repeated cyberattack, often from high-level adversaries like foreign nation-states,” according to a new global survey of information technology executives.

The attacks include run-of-the-mill viruses and other “malware” that routinely strike corporate defenses, but also actions by “high-level” adversaries such as “organized crime, terrorists, or nation states,” a first-time global survey by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington has found. More than half of the 600 IT managers surveyed, who operate critical infrastructure in 14 countries, reported that their systems have been hit by such “high-level” attacks, the survey concludes.

A large majority, 59 percent, said they believed that foreign governments or their affiliates had already been involved in such attacks or in efforts to infiltrate important infrastructure – such as refineries, electric utilities, and banks – in their countries.

Such attacks, the survey said, include sophisticated denial-of-service attacks, in which an attacker tries to so overwhelm a corporate network with requests that the network grinds to a halt.

But they also include efforts to infiltrate a company. Fifty-four percent of the IT executives said their companies’ networks had been targets of stealth attacks in which infiltration was the intent. In two-thirds of those cases, the IT managers surveyed said company operations had been harmed.

The IT managers also believed that these “stealthy” attacks were conducted by “nation states” targeting their proprietary data, says the survey’s main author, CSIS fellow Stewart Baker, in a phone interview. Mr. Baker is a cybersecurity expert formerly with the Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency.

“It’s all the same kind of stuff – spear-phishing, malware, taking over the network and downloading-whatever-you-want kind of attack,” he says. “Over half of these executives believe they’ve been attacked with the kind of sophistication you’d expect from a nation state.”

The CSIS report describes such attacks as “stealthy infiltration” of a company’s networks by “a high-level adversary” akin to a “GhostNet,” or large spy ring featuring “individualized malware attacks that enabled hackers to infiltrate, control and download large amounts of data from computer networks.” The GhostNet attacks, which Canadian researchers attributed to Chinese state-run agencies, bear similarities to recent attacks on Google and other high-tech companies, Baker says. Google attributed attacks on it to entities in China.

Read the report:
In the Crossfire: Critical Infrastructure in the Age of Cyber War

See also:
In the Crossfire: Critical Infrastructure in the Age of Cyber War
Report: Critical Infrastructures Under Constant Cyberattack Globally
Utilities, Refineries and Banks Are Victims of Cyber Attacks, Report Says
Critical Infrastructure under Siege from Cyber Attacks
Critical Infrastructure Vulnerable To Attack
Critical Infrastructure Security a Mixed Bag, Report Finds
Report shows cyberattacks rampant; execs concerned
Key infrastructure often cyberattack target: survey
Critical infrastructure execs fear China
SCADA system, critical infrastructure security lacking, survey finds

Ironically, the more dependent we become on interconnected network technology, the more vulnerable we become too.

/so keep your fingers crossed and your computers patched against hacking and intrusion, at least you can do your part to avoid being part of the problem