In Your Face Obama And Reid!

After billions of dollars spent and decades of study and construction of the Yucca Mountain Repository, while nuclear waste has literally been piling up at nuclear power plants across the country, the Obama administration and Harry Reid conspired to abruptly pull the plug on the project, just as it was getting set to start receiving waste. Why? Because Democrats don’t like nuclear power (or electricity generation in general, for that matter) and if there’s nowhere to permanently store the nuclear waste, there won’t be any new nuclear power plants built. Well guess what? The battle for Yucca Mountain isn’t over yet.

Panel Blocks Move to Scrap Yucca Site

Federal regulators on Tuesday denied a request by the Obama administration to withdraw an application for the first national nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada.

A three-judge Nuclear Regulatory Commission panel said that Energy Secretary Steven Chu doesn’t have the power to withdraw the application because 1982 law “does not give the secretary the discretion to substitute his policy for the one established by Congress.”

The administration said in March that it would withdraw the application. The move marked a victory for Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid, (D., Nev.), who has made killing the Yucca Mountain project a priority. Mr. Reid is running for re-election this year in a tough race.

The Energy Department’s application to develop Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste repository has been pending with the NRC since June 2008, when the Bush administration applied for the license.

Utility operators had expressed concern at the Energy Department’s decision to withdraw the permit application, saying that without progress toward developing a permanent nuclear-waste storage facility some states could refuse to permit new nuclear power plants.

The nuclear industry has contributed about $10 billion to a fund to develop a permanent national waste facility.

See also:
NRC panel: Nuclear waste dump process continues
Energy Dept. Cannot Drop Nuclear Waste Plan
Panel’s decision keeps Yucca Mountain alive
DOE can’t scrap Yucca plans, panel says
RJtv YUCCA MOUNTAIN: NOT DEAD YET
Yucca Mountain: Nuclear Waste in Nevada
Eureka County, Nevada — Yucca Mountain.org
Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
The Democrat War On Electricity

Of course, the Obama administration won’t take no for an answer and will continue to try and sabatoge the Yucca Mountain Repository because nuclear power is bad. Let’s just hope we can get Yucca Mountain open, so that we can move all the nuclear waste from all across the country to a centralized storage facility, for safety and security reasons, and then maybe we could actually build some new nuclear power plants, like we already should have been doing for the last thirty years.

/it would probably also help to vote Democrats out of office this coming November, so they can no longer obstruct a rational U.S. energy policy

Something’s Happening Here, What It Is Ain’t Exactly Clear

Wal-Mart’s glow-in-the-dark mystery

It began in late 2007 as a routine audit. Retail giant Wal-Mart noticed that some exit signs at the company’s stores and warehouses had gone missing.

As the audit spread across Wal-Mart’s U.S. operations, the mystery thickened. Stores from Arkansas to Washington began reporting missing signs. They numbered in the hundreds at first, then the thousands. Last month Wal-Mart disclosed that about 15,800 of its exit signs – a stunning 20 per cent of its total inventory – are lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for at 4,500 facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico.

Poor housekeeping, certainly, but what’s the big deal?

In a word: radiation.

The signs contain tritium gas, a radioactive form of hydrogen. Tritium glows when it interacts with phosphor particles, a phenomenon that has led to the creation of glow-in-the-dark emergency exit signs.

. . .

And what about exposure from thousands of signs dumped near a source of drinking water, or packed with explosives in the back of a truck that has been driven into a crowded building?

“I’m sure thousands of them would create a credible dirty bomb,” says Norm Rubin, director of nuclear research at Energy Probe in Toronto. “Most experts think the main purpose of a dirty bomb is to cause panic, disruption and expensive cleanup rather than lots of dead bodies. A bunch of tritium, especially if oxidized in an explosion, would probably do that job fine.”

ENVIRONMENT: Wal-Mart’s Mysterious Missing Exit Signs: A Tritium Health Risk?

What do Home Depot, the Mormon Church, and the U.S. Coast Guard have in common?

Answer: Radioactivity.

According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the construction retailer, the church denomination, and the guardians of our coastline own hundreds of fluorescent exit signs containing the radioactive gas tritium. So, in fact, do various school districts, retail stores, and federal and state agencies. And if the signs are handled and disposed of improperly, tritium could make its way into our drinking water. The NRC was prompted to step in following Wal-Mart’s recent disclosure that 15,000 tritium exit signs have mysteriously disappeared from its stores nationwide.

On January 16, the NRC sent notices to 61 organizations that own 500 or more tritium signs to check the signs against their records and report any lost or missing signs to the agency. The recipients of the “demand for information” letter include the Department of the Navy, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Postal Service, and the West Point Military Academy, as well as several pharmaceutical, defense, and aviation companies nationwide.

In all, more than two million tritium exit signs are estimated to be in use in the United States. The signs are popular because they do not require electricity and provide emergency light and direction during evacuations.

From 2001 to 2007, Wal-Mart bought 70,000 tritium exit signs to install in its stores and warehouses, according to the NRC. In 2007, after discovering that some signs had disappeared, the company started a nationwide audit of its facilities. The result: a staggering 15,000 signs were lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for.

An NRC advisory states that the tritium signs pose “little or no threat to the public health and safety and do not constitute a security risk.” Others are not so sure. “Fifteen thousand missing tritium exit signs at 20 trillion picocuries each means that 300 quadrillion picocuries of tritium could be making its way into people’s drinking water,” warns David Lochbaum, director of the Nuclear Safety Project at the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Or, nearly four million gallons of water could be contaminated above the EPA’s drinking water standards. And what if 15,000 missing tritium exit signs is a low estimate?”

/certainly nothing good can come of this