The Curious Case Of Gary Brooks Faulkner

What’s the deal with this guy? There just has to be more to the story here.

U.S. Man Arrested for ‘Hunting’ Bin Laden

An American construction worker who was arrested with a 40-inch sword, a pistol and night-vision goggles in northwestern Pakistan told investigators Tuesday that he wanted to kill Osama bin Laden to avenge the 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S.

Gary Brooks Faulkner, 50 years old, of Greeley, Colo., was caught by Pakistani police Monday in the remote Bumburat Valley near the border of Afghanistan’s Nuristan province, where he apparently hoped to find Mr. bin Laden.

Police quoted Mr. Faulkner as saying he wanted to avenge the victims of the attacks on New York and Washington. He was carrying Christian religious books, according to Mumtaz Ahmed Khan, a senior police officer in the northwestern town of Chitral.

Mr. Faulkner arrived in Chitral on June 3 and stayed in a hotel in Bumburat Valley, an area famous for its spring dancing festival, which attracts large number of foreign visitors every year.

At a news conference near the Colorado statehouse in Denver, Mr. Faulkner’s younger brother, Scott Faulkner, a physician, described Gary as “a man on a mission.”

“He’s not crazy,” Dr. Faulkner said of his brother. “He’s not a psychopath. He’s not a sociopath.”

. . .

After the 9/11 attacks, he said Mr. Faulkner began visiting Pakistan to try to find Osama bin Laden because he felt the U.S. military was not “doing enough.” Dr. Faulkner said his brother grew a beard and adopted local attire to assimilate in Pakistan and obtain intelligence there.

“Who says, ‘Why do I rob banks? Because that’s where the money is,'” Dr. Faulkner asked. He said his brother went to Pakistan because “that’s where Osama is.”

The current trip was roughly Mr. Faulkner’s sixth to Pakistan since 2002, Dr. Faulkner said. The physician said he drove his brother to the airport, and that Mr. Faulkner wasn’t carrying any weapons when he boarded the plane. “He did not have a sword, although that is his weapon of choice in Pakistan,” said Dr. Faulkner, who said he thought his brother obtained the sword in Pakistan.

Dr. Faulkner said his brother also brought wire ties to use as handcuffs on Mr. bin Laden. He said that if Mr. Faulkner, who must undergo dialysis three times a week, killed or captured Mr. bin Laden, he planned to use his reward money to retire to Nicaragua, where he would help locals build houses.

See also:
Pakistan holds American man hunting bin Laden
US officials meet with American hunting bin Laden
Pakistan: US bin Laden hunter on mission from God
Gary Brooks Faulkner: Was ‘American ninja’ working for CIA?
‘Rambo’: Osama hunt my holy war
Gary Brooks Faulkner examined by doctor in Pakistan, say Bin Laden hunter has psychological problems
Details Emerge On Would-Be Bin Laden Assassin, Gary Brooks Faulkner
What was Gary Brooks Faulkner reading?

You know, if you’re an lone American wandering around the lawless Afghanistan-Pakistan border, carrying a sword and Christian reading materials is a nice touch. One thing’s for sure, he was in the right ballpark for bin Laden hunting and $25 million in bounty is a lot of money. As they say, truth is stranger than fiction.

/is Faulkner crazy or crazy like a fox?

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It’s Okay, It’s Just Jihad, Not Terrorism

Va. suspects in Pakistan say mission was jihad not terrorism

Five men arrested in Pakistan indicated Monday that they plan to fight terrorism charges that Pakistani police are recommending by using a strategy seen in U.S. courtrooms: that they were preparing for jihad but not planning any terror attacks.

The men told a Pakistani court that they had neither sought nor established contact with extremist groups, and traveled to the region only “to help the helpless Muslims,” according to their Pakistani attorney. As they entered the courtroom, one of the men, Ramy Zamzam, told reporters: “We are not terrorists. We are jihadists, and jihad is not terrorism.”

No charges were filed during the hearing in Sargodha, but Pakistani police said their formal recommendation that the men be charged under anti-terrorism laws — and sentenced to life in prison — would be filed by Tuesday. A judge would decide whether to prosecute the five Americans, who are due back in court on Jan. 18.

The men, all from the Alexandria area, left the United States shortly after Thanksgiving without telling their parents, who alerted the FBI. They were arrested Dec. 8 at the family home of Khalid Farooq Chaudhry, the father of one of the men, Umar Chaudhry. The elder Chaudhry was released from custody on Monday by the judge because of insufficient evidence against him, officials said.

Pakistani police say the men were in contact with a Taliban recruiter, were seeking to join al-Qaeda and came to Pakistan to carry out terrorist acts. The FBI is also investigating the men, and officials have said the Justice Department is likely to consider charges in the United States.

See also:
Five men detained in Pakistan deny ties to Al Qaeda in court
Detainees Deny Plotting Terror
U.S. Suspects in Pakistan Invoke Jihad, Not Terrorism
Five Americans say no plan to attack inside Pakistan
5 American terror suspects appear in Pakistan court
American terror suspects’ trial in Pakistan: Conviction may be tough
Pak court remands American Muslim youths to judicial custody

See? They’re jihadis, not terrorists, they’re just misunderstood.

/just the good ol’ boys, never meanin’ no harm