Lady Al Qaeda Goes To Jail, Pakistan Seethes

Remember boys and girls, Pakistan is our ally.

Pakistani Woman Sentenced for Attacks on U.S. Troops

A suspected al-Qaeda agent was sentenced yesterday to more than eight decades in U.S. prison for the July 2008 attempted killings of U.S. troops, Agence France-Presse reported. At the time of the MIT-educated neuroscientist’s arrest, she was reportedly in possession of instructions for making a radiological “dirty bomb” (see GSN, Feb. 4).

Pakistani-born Aafia Siddiqui was convicted in U.S. federal court in February for the attempted shootings of several U.S. soldiers and FBI agents interrogating her in an Afghan police station. The 38-year-old mother of three was charged with seizing a serviceman’s rifle and opening fire while yelling “death to America,” though no one was struck by the bullets. Siddiqui took a bullet to the stomach before she was restrained.

. . .

Among her possessions at the time of her 2008 arrest in Afghanistan were documents referring to a “mass casualty attack” on New York City and containers filled with sodium cyanide, the Associated Press reported (Tom Hays, Associated Press/Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 24).

So, she was an al Qaeda operative who tried to kill American soldiers while screaming “death to America” and had in her possession plans and materials for a dirty bomb attack on New York City. You’d think our close ally Pakistan would be glad and grateful that this terrorist scum menace is off the streets for the next 86 years, right? Well, you couldn’t be more wrong.

Pakistan angry over terror conviction in US

The country’s leaders were quick to show their outrage at the sentence handed down to a Pakistani woman convicted of attacking U.S. agents, as were opposition politicians. By the time weekly prayers rolled round, protesters were battling police and the Pakistani Taliban had offered its support.

The sentencing of Aafia Siddique to 86 years in an American jail left enemies and political opponents reading from the same script Friday, riding a wave of anger on behalf of a woman widely believed to be an innocent victim of a vengeful, post 9/11 American justice system.

See also:
Judge Gives Pakistani Woman 86 Years in Attack
Pakistan neuroscientist given 86 years for shooting at US agents
Pakistani Scientist Sentenced To 86 Years For Trying To Kill US Agents
Pakistani scientist gets 86 years for shooting
‘Lady al Qaeda’ sentenced to 86 years in prison
Pakistani scientist ‘Lady Al Qaeda’ sentenced to 86 years in prison for trying to kill U.S. soldiers
Pakistani scientist gets 86 years for attempted murder
Protests erupt over Dr Aafia’s conviction
Aafia’s sentence sparks protests in twin cities
Pakistanis Protest NY Court Ruling on Female Scientist
U.S. Sentence for Pakistani Ignites Anger and Protests
Pakistanis Protest Scientist’s Sentencing In U.S.
Country erupts over Dr Aafia verdict
Rallies slam US court sentence against Aafia
APWA strongly condemns Aafia’s sentence
Nisar asks MPs to stage walkout over Aafia’s conviction
Pakistani foreign minister ‘disappointed’ over scientist’s sentence
Govt chalks out strategy for Aafia’s repatriation
Legal efforts to seek reprieve for Aafia initiated
Aafia Siddiqui

Every year, we give Pakistan billions in humanitarian and military aid and this is the hatred and scorn we get in return.

/make you wonder which side Pakistan is really on, doesn’t it?

Obama Plans To Invade Pakistan

Mister Nobel Peace Prize winner is apparently preparing to keep one of his campaign promises and launch “overseas contingency operations” on Pakistani soil.

Options studied for a possible Pakistan strike

The U.S. military is reviewing options for a unilateral strike in Pakistan in the event that a successful attack on American soil is traced to the country’s tribal areas, according to senior military officials.

Ties between the alleged Times Square bomber, Faisal Shahzad, and elements of the Pakistani Taliban have sharpened the Obama administration’s need for retaliatory options, the officials said. They stressed that a U.S. reprisal would be contemplated only under extreme circumstances, such as a catastrophic attack that leaves President Obama convinced that the ongoing campaign of CIA drone strikes is insufficient.

“Planning has been reinvigorated in the wake of Times Square,” one of the officials said.

At the same time, the administration is trying to deepen ties to Pakistan’s intelligence officials in a bid to head off any attack by militant groups. The United States and Pakistan have recently established a joint military intelligence center on the outskirts of the northwestern city of Peshawar, and are in negotiations to set up another one near Quetta, the Pakistani city where the Afghan Taliban is based, according to the U.S. military officials. They and other officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity surrounding U.S. military and intelligence activities in Pakistan.

The “fusion centers” are meant to bolster Pakistani military operations by providing direct access to U.S. intelligence, including real-time video surveillance from drones controlled by the U.S. Special Operations Command, the officials said. But in an acknowledgment of the continuing mistrust between the two governments, the officials added that both sides also see the centers as a way to keep a closer eye on one another, as well as to monitor military operations and intelligence activities in insurgent areas.

Obama said during his campaign for the presidency that he would be willing to order strikes in Pakistan, and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a television interview after the Times Square attempt that “if, heaven forbid, an attack like this that we can trace back to Pakistan were to have been successful, there would be very severe consequences.”

Obama dispatched his national security adviser, James L. Jones, and CIA Director Leon Panetta to Islamabad this month to deliver a similar message to Pakistani officials, including President Asif Ali Zardari and the military chief, Gen. Ashfaq Kiyani.

Jones and Panetta also presented evidence gathered by U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies that Shahzad received significant support from the Pakistani Taliban.

The U.S. options for potential retaliatory action rely mainly on air and missile strikes, but could also employ small teams of U.S. Special Operations troops already positioned along the border with Afghanistan. One of the senior military officials said plans for military strikes in Pakistan have been revised significantly over the past several years, moving away from a “large, punitive response” to more measured plans meant to deliver retaliatory blows against specific militant groups.

See also:
Report: US Preparing for Retaliatory Strike if Terror Attack Traced to Pakistan
US mulls unilateral Pakistan raids
U.S. studies options for possible Pakistan attack: report
US Army reviewing options for ‘unilateral’ strike on Pakistan
US develops plans for unilateral strike on Pakistan
US Preps a Retaliatory Hit on Pakistan
Airstrike on civilians blamed on mistakes…Pakistani Taliban could face retaliation if they strike the US

If you’re willing to put American boots on Pakistani ground in response to an attack on the United States you should also be willing to do the same as part of the war in Afghanistan.

/you can’t beat the Taliban unless you ultimately take the fight to where they live, in their Pakistani sanctuaries

Back From The Dead

Obama turned him into a newt, but he got better.

Analysis: ‘Slain’ Taliban leader garners attention in Pakistan

For three months, Hakimullah Mehsud was supposedly dead, killed in a U.S. drone attack in the mountains of Pakistan, according to Pakistani officials.

Then word came last week from intelligence sources in Pakistan that he had not after all been killed, that he had been injured but not seriously.

And within days of that news, not one but two messages followed from Mehsud himself, both purportedly recorded in April. They warned of imminent attacks by the Pakistani Taliban, known as Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan or TTP, on unspecified targets in the United States.

U.S. intelligence and counterterrorism officials remain very skeptical about any TTP involvement in the weekend’s attempted car bombing in New York. One senior official said it would be “an enormous surprise” if they were involved.

The TTP has shown little appetite or capability for operating beyond Pakistan and Afghanistan, though it was linked to a suicide bombing plot that unfolded in Spain and was broken up in 2008.

But Mehsud is back in action, courting publicity again.

Whether he is still the leader of the TTP is an open question.

Last week, while U.S. officials said they still weren’t sure whether he was dead or alive, Defense Department spokesman Geoff Morrell said, “I certainly have seen no evidence that [Mehsud] is operational today or is executing or exerting authority over the Pakistan Taliban as he once did. So I don’t know if that reflects him being alive or dead, but he clearly is not running the Pakistani Taliban anymore.”

But in light of the video that surfaced over the weekend, that assessment may have to be revisited.

See also:
Video shows Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud ‘alive’
New videos show Pakistani Taliban chief thought to have been killed in January
Pakistan Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud is alive, says spy agency
Pakistan Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud is alive: spy agency
Video shows Pakistan Taliban boss alive
Hakeemullah appears in video, vows painful blow to US
Mehsud claims responsibility for New York bomb plot
Officials doubt Pakistani Taliban behind New York bomb attempt
Hakimullah Mehsud

Hey Obama administration, next time, before you publicly claim credit and pat yourselves on the back for killing one of these lowlife terrorist scumbags, make damn sure they’re really dead.

/now fire up the drones, get out there, and kill Mehsud again!