An Election Worthy Of Tammany Hall

This weekend’s parliamentary election in Afghanistan would make Boss Tweed blush. You can try and put lipstick on the pig, but it’s quite obvious that the election results are overwhelmingly fraudulent and illegitimate.

Election Complaints Overwhelm Afghan Voter Commission

Afghanistan’s U.N.-backed Electoral Complaints Commission says it has received nearly 3,000 formal complaints about Saturday’s parliamentary elections, casting doubt on the legitimacy of the vote.

The commission says it received more than 1,300 of those complaints since election day, while the rest came before the vote. Tuesday was the official deadline for Afghans to file complaints.

Shortly after the polls closed Saturday, the ECC said it received allegations of fraud and misconduct that included late-opening polling centers, ballot shortages and voter registration fraud.

Ahmad Nader Nadery is the head of the Free and Fair Election Foundation of Afghanistan, which was one of the monitors of the vote.

“Frauds did happen in different forms. We have seen ballot stuffing, proxy votes, underage voting and also multiple voting,” said Nadery. “The most serious one is the ballot stuffing, our observers have observed in around 280 centers, in 28 provinces where the ballot stuffing did occur.”

Some election observers also voiced concerns that local warlords intimidated or coerced voters in some instances.

Afghan election commission reports new evidence of serious fraud

Internal reports from Afghanistan’s Independent Election Commission on Tuesday provide new evidence of serious fraud in Afghanistan’s parliamentary elections, including turnouts that exceeded 100 percent in many southeastern districts under the control of the Taliban or other militants.

One district in Paktika province recorded 626 percent voter turnout, according to reports obtained by McClatchy Newspapers.

The new indications of fraud appear to strengthen allegations of widespread intimidation, vote rigging and violence that independent Afghan poll monitors began making almost immediately after the polls closed on Saturday and cast new doubts on the commission’s assertion that it knew of no instances in which commission staff members stuffed ballots.

See also:
Voter fraud claims abound after Afghan elections
Observers cite ‘serious concerns about quality’ of Afghan elections
After Afghan Vote, Complaints of Fraud Surface
Afghan election watchdog amasses evidence of fraud
Fraud, violence tarnished Afghan vote, watchdog group says
Karzai Hails Afghan Election as ‘Serious’ Flaws Found
Karzai praises Afghan balloting, but monitors say election was rigged
Low bar
Are Afghanistan elections hurting democracy?
Afghan Elections: Corruption Could Again Thwart Democracy
Bodies of 3 Afghan election workers found

Welcome to “”democracy”, Afghan style, smells like “nation building” gone wrong and behaving badly.

/and our brave troops are right in the middle of this fiasco, fighting and dying for something or other, does anyone really know anymore?

A Recipe For Disaster

Can you smell what Iran is cooking?

Key Iraqi Sunni Political Bloc Pulls Out of March 7 Parliamentary Election

A key Sunni political bloc declared Saturday that it would not take part in Iraq’s March 7 parliamentary election. Saleh al-Mutlak, who was banned from running by a parliamentary committee, is pulling his National Dialogue Front out of the election with just over a week to go before voting is set to begin.

The decision by veteran Sunni politician Saleh al-Mutlak to pull his political bloc out of the approaching election poses a severe blow to the Iraqi electoral process, and gives ammunition to adversaries of any compromise.

An appeals court recently upheld a decision by a parliamentary committee barring al-Mutlak from running, because of alleged ties to the Baath Party of deposed leader Saddam Hussein.

Mutlak’s spokesman, Haidar al-Mullah, told reporters that his National Dialogue Front was “boycotting the upcoming election” and urged other parties to do the same. He supported the decision by citing complaints by U.S. commander in Iraq General Ray Odierno and Ambassador Christopher Hill over Iranian interference in the electoral process.

The parliament committee which banned dozens of prominent Sunni candidates from running in the election is led by pro-Iranian politicians Ahmad Chalabi and Ali Faisal al-Lami. Chalabi denied, Friday, on Al Hurra TV, that Iran had any responsibility in the decision.

. . .

Top U.S. officials, as well as many Iraqi Sunni leaders, have accused Iran of pushing for the decision to ban key Sunni politicians from running in the election. Marina Ottaway thinks that it may be a “bit much to see the long arm of [Iranian] President [Mahmoud] Ahmedinejad” behind the current crisis, because Iraq, she says, “has never had much of a democratic tradition.”

Abou Diab, however, believes that the current political imbroglio has clear Iranian origins, and that Iran wants “to turn Iraq into a friendly client-state after the planned U.S. withdrawal,” next August.

See also:
Iraq party pulls out of vote
Popular Sunni political party to boycott Iraqi elections
Sunni party vows to boycott Iraqi elections
Fears of Iraq poll boycott after Sunni party pulls out
Sunni party to boycott Iraqi elections
Sunni bloc boycotts Iraq vote citing Iran interference
In Turmoil, Sunni Party in Iraq Calls for Vote Boycott
Secular party withdraws from Iraq’s elections
Sunni Bloc Boycotts Iraq Polls
Sunni party pulls out of Iraq elections
US envoy accuses Iran over poll ban
US general links Chalabi to Iran
Chalabi Tells General Odierno: ‘Mind Your Own Business’ – Iraq News Agency, Iraq
Iraqi former PM Allawi meets Saudi king ahead of polls

Remember Ahmed Chalabi? He was instrumental in providing us with the information (reports of weapons of mass destruction and Saddam’s alleged ties to al-Qaeda) that got us to invade Iraq and overthrow Saddam Hussein. Now, it appears that he’s trying to deliver control over Iraq to the Iranians after we leave. Have we been played as the world’s biggest suckers by Iran and her agents?

/wouldn’t it be a shame if Ahmed Chalabi were to suddenly go missing?