Operation AI

It was seventy years ago today . . .

Nation pauses to remember Pearl Harbor

Survivors of the surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor gathered Wednesday to remember the 2,400 people who lost their lives exactly 70 years ago.

“Just as every day and unlike any other day, we stop and stand fast in memory of our heroes of Pearl Harbor and the Second World War,” Rear Adm. Frank Ponds, commander for Navy region Hawaii, told the gathering.

U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus took note of the devastating legacy of the two-hour attack on Pearl Harbor 70 years ago.

“The history of December 7, 1941, is indelibly imprinted on the memory of every American who was alive that day. But it bears repeating on every anniversary, so that every subsequent generation will know what happened here today and never forget,” Mabus said.

See also:
Nation marks 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor Day: Survivors remember attack, pay respects on 70th anniversary
Nation marks 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor
Survivors, veterans mark somber Pearl Harbor remembrance
Pearl Harbor survivor remembers day of infamy
Senator Inouye Recalls Pearl Harbor Attack’s ‘Black Puffs of Explosion’
Pearl Harbor survivors group says it will disband
Veteran Of Pearl Harbor Dies On Anniversary Of Attack
Pearl Harbor survivors return to ships after death
Pearl Harbor survivors who lived until their 90s have their ashes interred in their ships
Overview of The Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941
Attack at Pearl Harbor, 1941
Attack on Pearl Harbor

Never forget.

/and more importantly, never let it happen again

Kim Jong-il Was Eight Years Old

It was sixty years ago today, when his daddy, Kim Il Sung, started a war that has yet to end.


The forever war

Vietnam used to claim that dubious title. Now it’s Afghanistan. But the surprise communist invasion 60 years ago today began a Korean war that eventually saw an armistice but still no peace treaty.

Indeed, since major fighting stopped in 1953, more than 90 Americans and 300 South Korean soldiers have been killed in clashes along the DMZ barbed wire between North and South Korea — in addition to the 46 ROK sailors killed by a North Korean torpedo in March.

That summer of 1950 tested America’s commitment to the cause of freedom as never before, not even in World War II. There was no Pearl Harbor, and no American interests at stake in Korea but one: that other peoples should never be enslaved against their will.

The Soviet-backed invasion came just five years after V-J Day. It was the first serious test of America’s post-World War II strength of will and its new strategy of containing communism. Would America step up to protect an impoverished nation so far from any vital shore? Many feared the Truman administration, with its attention focused on Europe, would not.

They were wrong. President Harry Truman got off a plane in Washington and immediately agreed to swift action to save South Korea. He had been thinking about Hitler and Mussolini on the plane, Truman said; this time, the totalitarians would not get away with it. America would send in troops at once.

The problem was, there were no troops — or very few. In 1945, America had spent $50 billion on defense, in 1950 $5 billion. Its 8.25 million-strong military had shrunk to less than 600,000, most of them still in Europe. The Eighth Army’s four undermanned, underequipped divisions would somehow have to stem the massive communist tide, as Gen. Walton Walker fed his troops in piecemeal.

See also:
S Korea marks 60th anniversary of Korean War
Tensions ripple through Korean peninsula on 60th anniversary of war
North Korea ratchets up tension as South marks 60th anniversary of war
South Korea Commemorates 60th Anniversary of Korean War
Not forgotten: Korean War veterans remember on the 60th anniversary
60th anniversary to start of Korean War gets gala memorial celebration
Korean War veterans mark 60th anniversary
Korean vets remember 60th anniversary
60th Anniversary Of The Start Of Korean War Remembered
Korean War National Museum
Korean War Veterans Memorial
Korean War Veterans Memorial
Korean War

Technically, we’re still at war, there was only a ceasefire, South Korea never signed the Korean Armistice Agreement. So, the South Koreans live in freedom while the North lives in oppressive darkness.

/when will the North be free and Korea finally reunited?

Free At Last

Navy frees stuck warship off coast of Honolulu

The Navy on Monday freed the $1 billion guided missile cruiser that had been stuck for more than three days since it ran aground close to the coast of Honolulu.

The USS Port Royal was pulled off a rock and sand shoal at around 2 a.m. after crews removed about 500 tons of water and 100 tons of anchors and other equipment to lighten the vessel, the Navy said in a statement.

The removal by a salvage ship and seven tug boats took about 40 minutes.

No one was injured during the recovery effort, said Rear Adm. Joe Walsh, the U.S. Pacific Fleet deputy commander.

The area was to be examined to determine if the ship leaked any fuel, said Coast Guard Capt. Barry Compagnoni.

The Port Royal was being towed to Naval Station Pearl Harbor for inspection.

See also:
Whoops!
Third Time Not a Charm
Navy Takes Off Fuel, Water, People to Lighten Missile Cruiser
Navy tries again to move ship

Port Royal’s props, sonar bulb damaged in grounding

The USS Port Royal sheared off the blades of its two propellers, damaged the sonar bulb that extends from its bow and left its anchors, anchor chains and other debris on the ocean floor during the nearly five days it was stuck on a rock and sand ledge just off Honolulu Airport’s Reef Runway, the Navy said today.

The $1 billion, guided missile cruiser sat at Pearl Harbor’s Mike 3 pier this afternoon as Navy divers ran a remotely operated vehicle underneath it looking for possible other damage.

The Port Royal had just spent four months in drydock when it ran aground in 17 to 22 feet of water Thursday night following its first day of sea trials.

It will return to drydock at the end of this week for repairs, said Rear Adm. Joseph A. Walsh, deputy commander and chief of staff of the Pacific Fleet.

See also:
Coast Guard spots sheen; no threat to environment
Coast Guard monitoring oil sheen near where ship was stuck

USS Port Royal Commander Relieved of Duties

The commanding officer of the USS Port Royal has been temporarily relieved of his duties, four days after the missile cruiser ran aground offshore of the Honolulu Airport.

Captain John Carroll will be off that duty during the investigation to determine the cause of the grounding.

Carroll took command of the USS Port Royal last October.

See also:
Navy captain relieved of command
Captain of ship stuck off Hawaii relieved of duty

/thank God Almighty, it’s free at last

Third Time Not a Charm

Poor Captain Carroll . . .

Sunday: Defiant Navy Ship Still Stuck After 3rd Extraction Attempt

A third attempt to refloat USS Port Royal (CG 73) proved unsuccessful this morning, leaving the guided missile cruiser aground about a half-mile south of Honolulu Airport.

This morning’s attempt was made with the concerted effort of the salvage ship USNS Salvor (T-ARS-52), M/V Dove and four Navy and three commercial tugboats.

The Port Royal’s hull is structurally sound and there has been no fuel leakage or spillage.

. . .

Larger tug boats and tow vessels provided more pulling power than was mustered the two previous mornings. Today’s effort again coincided with the high tide, which occurred about 3 a.m. The ship, however, remained aground after four hours of towing, which began at 1:30 a.m.

The Navy is assessing its options on how to proceed.

See also:
Whoops!
USNS Salvor (T-ARS 52)
USNS SALVOR (T-ARS 52)

It’s interesting to note that the M/V Dove is standing by. This is a support vessel for the Sea-Based X-band (SBX) Radar

Sea-Based X-band (SBX) Radar is the tracking and discrimination radar used for the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system. SBX will consist of a large X-Band half-populated radar mounted on a modified fifth-generation semi-submersible platform with Battle Management Command Control and Communications, which includes In-flight Interceptor Communication System Data Terminals and associated communications; power generation; facility floor space; and infrastructure, similar to a fixed radar installation.

The SBX provides detailed ballistic missile tracking information to the GMD system, as well as advanced target and countermeasures discrimination capability for the GMD interceptor missiles. The ability of the SBX to deploy to operating locations under its own power allows it to support actual GMD operations as well as realistic testing.

. . .

The support vessel operations include operation the Motor/Vessel (M/V) Dove. The functions of the M/V Dove include: SBX maritime and mission equipment crew transport and transfer, fueling of the SBX, provision re-supply, transport and transfer of all equipment and hardware to and from the SBX, anchor handling, and when necessary, towing of the SBX. Logistical shore facilities are also required to support the SBX mission. There are two shore sites associated with the operations and support of the SBX: the Primary Support Base (PSB) located in Adak, Alaska (the home port for the SBX), and the Operational Support Site (OSS) located in Anchorage, Alaska. The PSB provides the functions of fuel coordination, environmental response capabilities, and is the shipping/receiving point for personnel and supplies to/from the SBX-1.

The presence of the M/V Dove is probably related to the fact that, as reader Render pointed out on a previous thread, the USS Port Royal is an element of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense component of our Ballistic Missile Defense System.

See also:
Ballistic Missile Defense

/anyway, if they can’t refloat the Port Royal, maybe they can turn her into a land based component of the missile defense system or, if all else fails, a maritime museum

UPDATE:

Navy to unload water, anchors to free stuck ship

The Navy plans to remove 800 tons of water from a warship that ran aground off the coast of Honolulu before again trying to free the ship.

The Navy hopes the lighter load will help it pull the USS Port Royal to safety. Several attempts to free the $1 billion cruiser have failed since it got stuck on a rock and sand shoal Thursday.

Rear Adm. Joe Walsh, U.S. Pacific Fleet deputy commander, says the Navy will try again early Monday, at the next high tide.

The water the Navy plans to unload is seawater the Port Royal has taken on to replace the weight of burned fuel. It helps balance the ship. The Navy also plans to unload about 40 tons’ worth of anchors and anchor chains.

/if at first you don’t succeed . . .

Whoops!

Navy hopes high tide will help free grounded warship

One of the biggest and most technologically advanced warships based at Pearl Harbor remained aground today in 17 to 22 feet of water a half-mile off Honolulu International Airport’s Reef Runway.

No one was injured in the incident, which was reported around 9 last night, the Navy said.

Navy tugs tried early in the morning to nudge the 9,600-ton and 567-foot guided missile cruiser USS Port Royal off the sandy bottom, but were unsuccessful, officials said.

Crew members on the Clean Islands, an oil recovery vessel that was positioned behind the Port Royal as a precaution, said the water was so shallow they could see the bottom.

The Navy said divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One from Pearl Harbor and the salvage ship USS Salvor would try to tow the warship.

Officials said the guided missile cruiser left port yesterday for several days of sea trials after leaving drydock about a month ago for routine maintenance. Shore-based Navy officials were being transferred to Hickam harbor by small boat when the grounding occurred, the Navy said.

Navy officials said a high tide that could float the cruiser off the bottom is expected at 2:45 a.m. tomorrow morning.

See also:
CG 73 Port Royal
USS Port Royal (CG-73)
Home — USS Port Royal (CG 73)

/sucks to be Captain John Carroll right about now

UPDATE:

Navy fails to free warship grounded at Hawaii

An attempt to pull a $1 billion warship free after it ran aground off the coast of Honolulu was unsuccessful Saturday, but the Navy planned to try again after lightening the vessel’s weight.

Navy tugboats and a salvage ship, the USS Salvor, tried to tow out the USS Port Royal at high tide early Saturday, but the guided missile cruiser remained stuck on the sandy, rocky bottom, said Pacific Fleet spokeswoman Agnes T. Tanyan.

Navy officials now plan to remove the ship’s fuel and water supplies in an effort to lighten the vessel and make it easier to refloat, she said.

/she must have been moving at speed to get this stuck, heads will definitely roll