Syria Circling The Drain

So far, we’ve seen varying degrees of serious Muslim unrest in Pakistan, Lebanon, Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Algeria, Bahrain, Libya, and Oman. Now, it appears that Syria is also on the verge of descending into chaos.

Thousands continue protests in Syria

Thousands of people took to the streets in the southern city of Dara, chanting “Syria, Freedom,” a day after a deadly crackdown on protests there, human rights activists said.

The demonstrations Thursday occurred at the funerals for some of those killed when government forces opened fire on protesters the previous day. Initial reports put the death toll at 15, but Reuters news agency, citing a hospital source, said more than 25 people were killed.

. . .

No additional violence was reported Thursday, but human rights activists said a number of Syrian writers and journalists who reported on the unrest in Dara had been arrested.

. . .

Presidential advisor Bouthaina Shaaban pledged to consider ending the emergency law in place since 1963 that has allowed the government to detain anyone without a warrant or a trial.

She said the government was also drafting a law that would allow political parties other than the ruling Baath party to operate, and loosen restrictions on news media. She also promised wage increases and health insurance for public servants.

But the human rights activists noted that the promises were not binding and pledged to move forward with their plans for Friday protests.

See also:
Syria’s Bashar al-Assad faces most serious unrest of his tenure
The Syrian revolt
Syria: patience of people running thin
Thousands Protest At Syrian Funerals
Thousands of Syrians chant “freedom” at Deraa mosque
Reports of bloodbath in Syria
Syrian Police Kill at Least 15 Protesters
Syria changes tack, promises reform
Syria offers reforms to calm violence
Syria crisis: Can reforms appease protesters?
Obama administration condemns Syria crackdown
2011 Syrian protests

Like Libya, here’s another revolt that I can heartily root for. Bashar al-Assad has buckets of American and Israeli blood on his hands and I would thoroughly enjoy watching his corpse being dragged through the streets. Tomorrow’s planned Day of Rage, after Friday prayers, could be a tipping point as to whether the Syrian government will fall or brutally repress the protesters. Stay tuned.

/of course, the Muslim country government that I would most like to see circle the drain is the Iranian regime, directly responsible for well over 90% of all the terrorism on the planet, maybe, hopefully, soon

Death Of The Green Movement

So much for any hope of regime change in Iran any time soon. What a damn shame that the United States government offered exactly zero encouragement and support for the Green Movement when the Iranian opposition had the most momentum, directly after the last Iranian elections.

Iran moves to finally crush opposition movement

Iran’s last two legally registered political parties were disbanded this week after their leaders were thrown in jail. The government also banned a reformist newspaper and has carried out arrests of a number of high profile liberals.

Activists said that almost all prominent opposition supporters had suffered in the 10 months since June’s presidential election which returned Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to power.

Opponents have suffered increasing harassment in recent weeks with new restrictions imposed on their movements, monitoring and disruption of phone calls and warnings of future punishment.

One activist said: “This is not a normal country. I cannot express my views or carry out my activities in any way more.

“There is no more mobile contact between us in the opposition. We can only meet by shaking off the people who tail us. The risks are high and getting worse.”

Mirhossein Mousavi, Iran’s opposition leader, is being held under restrictive conditions, according to close associates who claim they can no longer communicate directly with their leader.

Activists close to the former Iranian prime minister who finished second behind President Ahmadinejad told the The Daily Telegraph that they can no longer regularly communicate with their leader.

The leader of Iran’s Green Movement has not been seen in public for two months and only rarely leaves home. Neither he or his politically active wife Zahra Rahnavard have access to a telephone and their attempts at email communication has been limited.

The two political parties were outlawed after their leaders were imprisoned for helping to plan demonstrations. Mohsen Mirdamadi, leader of the Islamic Iran Participation Front and Mostafa Tajzadeh Mujaheddin of the Islamic Revolution Organisation were sentenced to six years in prison on Monday.

See also:
Iran bans the country’s two remaining official opposition parties
Iran widens clampdown on opposition
Bans, jail for Iran opposition
Suspensions Of Two Factions Aim To Cripple Iran Reform Drive
Official gives reasons to ban two reformist groups
Iran Bans Top Reformist Organizations
Iran Mutes a Chorus of Voices for Reform
Iran suspends two leading reformist parties: report
Iran sentences 3 opposition activists to prison
Three reformists get six-year jail terms in Iran: agency
Iran bans the country’s two remaining official opposition parties
Iran ‘bans newly-reopened reformist daily’
Iran shuts down prominent reformist newspaper
Iran: Another reformist newspaper banned
Press watchdog bans reformist newspaper

Where is the U.S. government on this, why aren’t Obama and Clinton making public statements strongly condemning this Iranian theocracy’s brutal silencing of political dissent?

/probably because Obama and the Democrats are too busy trying to silence political dissent here at home