Red Dragon Rising

Five months late, the Pentagon’s annual report on China’s military is finally released, and it’s not good news for the good guys.

China’s Modernizing Military Threatens Regional Peace, Pentagon Report Says

The swift advancement of the Chinese military, which is on course to grow into a modern fighting force by 2020, threatens to disrupt the politics of the Asia-Pacific region due to its opaque intentions, the U.S. Department of Defense said in a report released Wednesday.

In the briefing to Congress, the Pentagon said that “uncertainty about how China will use its growing capabilities,” especially in its development of power- projection platforms such as aircraft carriers, submarines, fighter jets, and long-range surface-to-air missiles, is worrying.

Read the report:

Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2011

See also:
US Says China’s Military Expanding Rapidly
China rises: US warns Beijing is expanding its military power
Pentagon cautions on China military might
China military ‘closing key gaps’, says Pentagon
China could build a modern military by 2020, says Pentagon
Pentagon releases report on China’s military
Assessing Concern Over China
China Has ‘Workable’ Anti-Ship Missile Design, Pentagon Says
China military has Taiwan in its sights
China’s military ‘catching up’ with US
China Slams Pentagon Over Critical Military Report
Xinhua ‘baffled’ by new Pentagon report on China
China denounces Pentagon report, defends military modernization
Despite some positive signs, Pentagon report on China still makes much ado about nothing

This just in, China is not our friend. We’re cutting our military, while China is building up their forces. And, to add insult to injury, we owe them over a trillion dollars.

/every day the Chinese spend dollars fleeced from America on weapons, their military gets stronger, and every day Obama squats in the White House, the United States gets weaker

Egypt Votes, But For What Exactly?

Egypt had a free and fair vote to amend the Egyptian constitution, that’s a good thing, right? Not so fast.

Egypt Approves Amendments

Egyptians voted in overwhelming numbers to approve a set of constitutional amendments, setting the stage for Egypt’s first truly contested parliamentary and presidential elections in decades.

Saturday’s historic referendum on the amendments saw millions of enthusiastic Egyptians wait patiently for hours to cast ballots in what for almost everyone was a novelty—a vote in which the result wasn’t effectively predetermined.

The largely peaceful and fraud-free vote was a marked contrast to past elections and a glimpse of how much has changed in Egypt in the weeks since President Hosni Mubarak stepped down amid widespread unrest, ending decades of single-party, autocratic rule.

Yet Saturday’s referendum also offered early clues into the rifts likely to shape Egyptian politics in the coming months and years. Many of the largely secular liberals who led the revolution that ousted Mr. Mubarak were opposed to the amendments, strongly suggesting the protest leaders have fallen out of sync with the vast majority of Egyptians.

Protest leaders criticized the amendments as part of a rushed and problematic timeline for establishing democracy; approving the changes started the clock on a race they said they are unprepared to run because they are still setting up parties.

Almost alone among the political groups in support of the amendments were the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist group outlawed under Mr. Mubarak, and the National Democratic Party, the former president’s ruling party. Both hope to capitalize on their already strong organizations in summer elections for parliament, which will then be charged with writing an entirely new constitution.
. . .

Journalists covering the announcement abandoned any pretenses of objectivity and yelled “Allahu Akbar!”—”God is Great!”—when the tallies were read out by officials.

See also:
How Egypt’s historic referendum could now bolster Islamists
Big majority vote for constitutional changes in Egypt
Egypt Backs Constitutional Changes That May Aid Brotherhood, Mubarak Party
Egypt: Constitution changes pass in referendum
Egyptians approve constitutional amendments in referendum
Egyptians overwhelmingly approve constitutional changes
Egyptians set for summer elections
Egyptian voters say ‘yes’ to speedy elections
Egypt’s Historic Referendum: Rushed But Moving
Egypt referendum results: 77.2 per cent say ‘Yes’ to the amendments
Egypt approves amendments, prepares for next step
Egyptians get taste of democracy in post-Mubarak era
Egyptians approve constitutional changes, clearing way for elections

Egypt has zero recent history of democracy or diverse political parties. So, obviously, whatever groups are already the most organized will benefit the most from the early elections just approved. And what’s the most organized group in Egypt? The Muslim Brotherhood. What happens if the Muslim Brotherhood comes to dominate the democratically elected parliament after this summer’s elections and, therefore, gets to write the new Egyptian constitution?

/it could very well turn out to be “one man, one vote, one time