Islam Takes Tunisia

This is the first election held in one of the countries that have undergone “Arab Spring” uprisings. And predictably, probably foreshadowing the outcome in upcoming elections in other “Arab Spring” countries, secularism took a beating and a backseat to the Islamists.

Secular party concedes defeat in landmark Tunisian election

Tunisia’s leading secularist party conceded defeat on Monday after unofficial tallies from the country’s first free election showed a victory for an Islamist party.

The election came 10 months from from the moment street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in a protest that started the Arab Spring uprisings.

More than 90 percent of the 4.1 million registered voters cast ballots, officials said.

See also:
Tunisian Islamist party claims election victory, set to dominate writing of new constitution
Tunisian Islamists to gain huge victory in first elections of the Arab Spring
Tunisia’s Islamists claim election victory
Tunisia’s Islamist party claims election victory
Islamists set for power after strong vote for Muslim parties in Tunisia’s first democratic elections since revolution
Early sign in Tunisia of strong Islamist vote
Tunisia elections: An-Nahda party on course to win
Moderate Islamists lead in early counting of Tunisian votes
Islamists claim win in Tunisia’s Arab Spring vote
Islamist Party Takes Half Of Overseas Seats In Tunisia
Tunisian liberal party dismayed at poor elections show
As Tunisia Counts its Votes, Can the West Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Islamists?

Could these Tunisian elections be the first stepping stone toward a wider, regional Islamic Caliphate?

/stay tuned, Egypt has elections coming up and if the Islamists win there . . .

Open Season On Christians In Egypt

With Mubarak no longer in power to keep the social lid on, Egypt’s Muslim majority is doing what it does best, practicing their religion of peace and tolerance by attacking and killing Christians and burning down their churches.

Christians: Egypt allows attacks

Egypt’s Coptic church blasted authorities Monday for allowing repeated attacks on Christians with impunity as the death toll from a night of rioting rose to 26, most of them Christians staging a peaceful protest in Cairo over an attack on a church.

The spiritual leader of the Coptic Christian minority, Pope Shenouda III, declared three days of mourning, praying and fasting for the victims, starting today. He also presided over funerals for some of the Christians who were killed. Sunday’s sectarian violence was the worst in Egypt since the uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak in February.

The clashes Sunday night raged over a large section of downtown Cairo and drew in Christians, Muslims and security forces. The violence began when about 1,000 Christian protesters tried to stage a peaceful sit-in outside the government-run television building along the Nile in downtown Cairo. The protesters said they were attacked with sticks, and the violence then spiraled out of control after a speeding military vehicle jumped onto a sidewalk and hit some of the Christians.

There was no breakdown available of how many Christians and Muslims were among the victims, but the 26 are believed to be mostly Christian. Officials said at least three soldiers were among the dead. Nearly 500 people were injured. Egypt’s official news agency said dozens have been arrested.

See also:
Anger boils over church attack in Egypt, at least 24 killed
Row over Coptic village church puts Egypt on edge
Christian, Muslim clashes rock Cairo
After Deadly Clashes, Egypt’s Christians On Edge
Egypt Violence Piles Pressure on Army to Hand Over Power Faster
Analysis: Situation only getting worse for Egypt’s Christians
The Copts Will Fight But they won’t win
Egypt’s Anti-Christian Violence: How Things Got So Bad
Vatican treads carefully on Egyptian violence
Siddiqui: Chill breeze in Arab Spring
Egypt riots reveal brutal reality behind ‘Arab Spring’

Remember, Obama and Hillary Clinton publicly called for Mubarak’s ouster and hailed the Egyptian “revolution” as an exercise in free democracy. Well, how’s that working out?

/also notice that, now that Christians are being killed in the streets and their churches burned down, Obama and Clinton are silent and nowhere to be found regarding the ongoing persecution by Muslims

Comedy Gold Power

Did she really say this [expletive deleted] with a straight face?

Clinton: US using “smart power” for Libya, Syria

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton defended the U.S. response to crises in Libya and Syria on Tuesday, saying the Obama administration is projecting “smart power” by refusing to act alone or with brute force to stop autocratic repression in the two countries.

. . .

Clinton said Libya was a study in the use of “strategic patience,” whereby the United States resisted the impulse for immediate intervention and instead helped to build support for the country’s nascent opposition, which the U.S. now recognizes as Libya’s legitimate government. She said the unprecedented NATO-Arab alliance protecting civilians on the ground was a key result of the tactics of smart power.

“This is exactly the kind of world that I want to see, where it’s not just the United States and everybody is standing on the sidelines while we bear the costs,” she said.

In Syria, Clinton said Washington had adopted a similar stance. The administration has imposed sanctions to protest a ruthless crackdown on reformers but has thus far resisted calls to make an explicit demand for President Bashar Assad to step down, something it did with Qaddafi.

Clinton said it would be a mistake for the administration to demand Assad’s ouster on its own because it wouldn’t be effective given Washington’s long-strained ties with Damascus and limited U.S. influence and trade with Syria.

See also:
U.S. taking “smart power” approach to Libya, Syria
Clinton: Libya, Syria show ‘smart power’ at work
Clinton: Libya, Syria show ‘smart power’ at work
Clinton: Libya, Syria show ‘smart power’ at work
Clinton: Libya, Syria show ‘smart power’ at work
‘Smart power’ at work, says Hillary Clinton
Clinton defends U.S. response on Syria
Clinton Passes Up Chance to Call on Assad to Step Down as Obama Remains Silent
A Conversation with Secretaries Hillary Clinton and Leon Panetta

Let’s recap: for months now, we’ve been bombing the [expletive deleted] out of Libya, a country that isn’t a direct threat to U.S. national security, killing civilians, destroying infrastructure, and backing a “rebel” movement containing elements of al Qaeda. That’s “smart power” and “strategic patience”, check. Meanwhile, Bashar Assad in Syria, a dictator in a country with plenty of American blood on its hands and a huge threat to U.S. national security, is killing civilians on a daily basis, with a death toll totaling in the thousands, and we’re doing nothing, because our relationship with Syria is “strained”. That’s also “smart power”, as well as “protecting civilians”, check.

What manner of counterproductive, nonsensical bull[expletive deleted] foreign policy is that? Smart Power my ass!

/are you seriously telling me that we have to put up with these moronic clowns for another year and a half?

Honk For Saudi Women

Seriously, what says 21st century like making your women wear bags and not allowing them to drive?

Saudi women encouraged to drive Friday

Saudi women are being encouraged to challenge the status quo and get behind the wheel Friday.

Though there are no traffic laws that make it illegal for women to drive in Saudi Arabia, religious edicts are often interpreted as a ban against female drivers. One female motorist spent more than a week in custody in May, supporters said.

The day is expected to be a test of wills — and authority — between police and the campaign, which has been publicized by Facebook, Twitter and other social media. It was not clear late Thursday how many would participate.

See also:
Saudi women to take fight from Web to road
Campaign Protests Saudi Arabia’s Ban On Women Behind The Wheel
Saudi Arabian women to drive Friday despite ban
Saudi women plan to defy authorities by driving cars Friday
Will Saudi women get in the driver’s seat?
In protest of Saudi ban on women drivers, will any brave the road?
Saudi women set to defy driving ban
Saudi women to protest driving ban
Honk for Saudi Women

Of course, any woman who participates in tomorrow’s driving defiance event will most likely be arrested and punished for an activity most of the rest of the world takes for granted. I hope they have the courage to stand up for themselves and wish them good luck in their protest.

/if it weren’t for their oil, the Saudi Arabian oil ticks would have absolutely zero redeeming value in the civilized world.

The Dominoes Stop Here

The Saudi “Day of Rage” came up way short on the raging. At least for now, it doesn’t look like the Oil Ticks are in any danger of being overthrown or the West’s primary oil apple cart is in any danger of being upset.

Saudi Arabia ‘day of rage’ protest fizzles

A call for protests in Saudi Arabia that had been talked about for weeks drew only a small number of people Friday, allowing the kingdom to keep at bay the waves of political unrest that have battered the Arab world.

The “day of rage” fizzled in all but restive Eastern province, where the country’s minority Shiite Muslims have been holding demonstrations for weeks. Several hundred protesters turned out in the cities of Hofuf, Awwamiya and Qatif to demand the release of political prisoners, according to news service reports.

But no protests occurred in other major Saudi cities, said Interior Ministry spokesman Maj. Gen. Mansour Turki. “You’ve seen the response of the Saudi people,” Turki said. “This is their response to the call for protest.”

See also:
‘Day of Rage’ a damp squib
Saudi Protests Draw Hundreds
Saudi Capital Calm On Day Protests Called
Saudi Arabia calm on planned ‘Day of Rage’
Saudi Arabia ‘Day of Rage’ begins quietly, markets watch protests closely
‘Day of Rage’ muted in Saudi Arabia
Saudi Police Presence Dampens ‘Day of Rage’
Saudi Arabia show of force stifles ‘day of rage’ protests
Saudi Arabian security forces quell ‘day of rage’ protests
Police presence damps Saudi ‘day of rage’
Strong police presence deters rallies in Saudi capital
Police flood Saudi capital
Saudi police block reform protests
Saudi Activists Fail to Gather Amid Heavy Police Presence
Saudi Arabia quashes planned pro-democracy protests
No threat seen to stability of Kingdom
Why Saudi Arabia is stable amid the Mideast unrest
Foreign Policy: Revolutions Won’t Hit Saudi Arabia

With the Saudis effectively keeping a lid on any protests and Gaddafi now routing and stomping the guts out of the “rebels” in Libya, while the West dithers, it seems as though the current wave of political unrest that has been sweeping the region for the last month or so has just about run it’s course for now. Realistically, there’s almost no more virgin territory left for the “days of rage” movement to keep spreading into.

/now it’s just a matter of watching where all the dust that’s already been kicked up finally settles

Tell Me Something I Don’t Already Know

Well, surprise, surprise.

Gaddafi Ordered Lockerbie Bombing, Says Resigned Libyan Minister

Libya’s Justice Minister who quit the post in protest against the brutal repression of anti-government protests has alleged that Libyan leader Moammer Gaddafi ordered the 1988 bombing of a U.S. airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland.

Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, who resigned on Monday, told Sweden’s Expressen daily that he had proof that the despot gave the order for the deadliest attack blamed on Gaddafi’s regime that claimed 270 lives.

See also:
LIBYA: Defected justice minister claims Kadafi ordered Lockerbie bombing, says Libyan leader’s days are numbered
Gaddafi ordered Lockerbie bombing, ex-minister claims
Gaddafi accused of ordering Lockerbie bombing
Libyan Justice Minister Accuses Gadhafi of Personally Ordering Pan Am 103 Bombing Over Lockerbie, Scotland
Did Gaddafi order Lockerbie bombing?
Yes or no: Was he really behind act of mass murder?
Gaddafi ‘ordered Lockerbie bombing’
Ex-minister claims Gaddafi personally ordered Pan Am terror bombing
Indict Gaddafi for the Lockerbie bombing
Former justice minister: Qaddafi ordered Lockerbie bombing
Report: Ex-minister says Gadhafi ordered Lockerbie
Report: Gadhafi ordered Lockerbie jet bombing
‘Gaddafi called for Lockerbie bombing and covered it up’
Kadhafi ordered Lockerbie bombing: ex-minister tells paper
Pan Am Flight 103

It’s just a matter of time now. Gaddafi is holed up in a section of Tripoli and he’s fast running out of friends with heavy weapons that haven’t already switched sides. There’s no way he gets out of this uprising alive. The sooner Gaddafi is dead, the better, let’s get this over with. And if the U.S. needed any more reason to pick sides in this revolt, besides the fact that Gaddafi is massacring civilians, this Gaddafi personally ordered the Lockerbie bombing confirmation should be impetus enough to get our ass off the sidelines of this conflict.

/at a minimum, we should be enforcing a no fly zone over Libya to prevent Gaddafi from using what’s left of his air power to bomb and rocket even more civilians

Egypt Circling The Drain

Here we go again. First Pakistan, then Lebanon, Tunisia, and now . . . Egypt?

Three Dead in Egypt As Protestors Demand Mubarak’s Exit

At least three people have died as tens of thousands of protestors continue to pack the streets of Cairo in what has become the biggest protest in recent Egyptian history.

Two protestors died in the city of Suez and a security officer died in downtown Cairo as protestors calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year reign clashed with police. At least 100 protestors were injured in Cairo, where police used tear gas, rubber bullets, batons and dogs to try to disperse the crowds, and Twitter has been blocked.

The Associated Press said that 10,000 people had flooded downtown Cairo, where demonstrators shouted “Down with Mubarak” and “Tunisia, Tunisia” as part of a protest called “Day of Anger” that was purposely scheduled for “National Police Day.” Earlier this month, protests in Tunisia sparked by the self-immolation of a disgruntled job seeker and spread by social media brought down the government of President Ben Ali.

In Egypt, the protest remained nonviolent for most of the day with marches in the square and around the capital. However, by late afternoon a large group began to move towards the Ministry of the Interior, home of the police force, and security forces responded by using rubber bullets, tear gas and water hoses.

See also:
Rioters Jolt Egyptian Regime
Egypt: Protest Against ‘Repressive’ Mubarak
Protestors shake Egypt’s streets
Egypt Protests Leave 3 Dead; Cairo Rally Broken Up
Egypt Police Disperse Anti-Mubarak Protesters
A dam breaking in Egypt
Egypt protesters report live bullets used
Egypt: President’s son and family ‘have fled to the UK’
Update: Egypt protests
U.S. urges restraint in Egypt, says government stable
White House keeps eye on Middle East protests
Twitter blocked in Egypt as thousands of protesters call for government reform [Updated]
Twitter blocked in Egypt after political unrest
Twitter confirms it is blocked in Egypt

Boy oh boy, you can bet the ranch that the Muslim Brotherhood are just salivating at the prospect of toppling the Mubarak government. Another Western domino would surely fall under the control of radical Islamists and it would be arguably the largest domino in the region. These developments do not bode well at all for U.S. and, especially, Israeli interests. And I don’t think these protests are going to stop either, the masses have a real taste for it now.

/is Obama just going to sit back and watch as the Middle East burns to the ground?

We Was Robbed!

What a travesty!


At World Cup, U.S. soccer coach Bob Bradley says disallowed score was ‘good goal’

To the thousands of U.S. supporters at Ellis Park and the millions back home watching Friday’s World Cup match between the United States and Slovenia, a clear injustice had been perpetrated. With no explanation as to why referee Koman Coulibaly had nullified Maurice Edu’s apparent go-ahead goal against Slovenia, rage rang out like a vuvuzela blaring inside a tollbooth.

Like everyone else, the U.S. team was incredulous and incensed. However, in the murky culture of soccer, where officiating decisions are rarely clarified during or after a match, Coach Bob Bradley took the mysterious call almost in stride.

“We’re all accustomed to the fact that, if it is an NFL playoff game and there is a call of some question, there will be a statement by the league from the referees. But FIFA operates differently,” Bradley, a New Jersey native, said of the sport’s international governing body on Saturday.

“Soccer is a different game. There are some aspects of it that are not made 100 percent clear, that seem to add to the discussion about the games. On our end, we get used to that. That’s just how it is sometimes, and then you move on and you get ready for the next game.”

Make no mistake: The U.S. delegation was grumbling after the final whistle of the 2-2 draw and, like many fans around the world, watched replays of the sequence dozens of times in search of answers. But because Coulibaly made a judgment call, FIFA guidelines do not offer a process to formally protest rulings made on the field.

Report: U.S.-Slovenia ref may be banned

According to a Yahoo! Sports report, World Cup referee Koman Coulibaly, whose unexplained call took away the United States’ go-ahead goal in the final minutes of Friday’s game vs. Slovenia, will face an expedited review and could be excluded from the rest of the World Cup.

The story credits a FIFA source as saying Coulibaly’s performance will be reviewed Saturday following a game in which replays showed he had some crucial missed calls and failed to control rough play.

“If he is found to have made a serious mistake, especially one that affected the outcome, then he would be highly unlikely to play any further part in the tournament,” said the source, who is close to senior figures on the refereeing panel. “FIFA is determined to keep refereeing standards high and does not want high-profile mistakes.”

See also:
U.S. Coach Says World Cup Goal Shouldn’t Have Been Disallowed
Donovan frustrated by disallowed goal
For U.S., Only Frustration Is Clear
Roddick fires volley over disallowed US goal
We Wuz Robbed!
Denied winning goal, USA tie Slovenia 2-2: slideshow
Analyst: Why FIFA Won’t Let Ref Explain His Call
FIFA to comment Monday on ref from Mali who ruled out US ‘goal’ against Slovenia
Report: Controversial referee likely to get boot
Gamblers Crying Foul Over Koman Coulibaly Call In World Cup
2010 FIFA World Cup: America’s Ire on Disallowed Goal a Good Thing for Football
Handballs and Bad Calls; Time for FIFA to Add Replay to the World Cup
Did the U.S. get robbed of the winning goal against Slovenia?

For the record, I am not a fan of introducing any type of instant replay into FIFA soccer. Part of the beauty of the game is that the time doesn’t stop, 45 minutes a half, straight through, without interruption. As for Koman Coulibaly, that was his first World Cup referee assignment and it damn well better be his last. He was horrible. However, banning Coulibaly from refereeing further World Cup games is no consolation for his monstrous mistake that may keep the U.S. from advancing.

/oh well, it is what it is, let’s just hope that we can beat Algeria on Wednesday and, for good measure, Slovenia beats or draws with England

Intifada At Isfahan

Iran protests intensify, prompting state of emergency in Isfahan

Iran security forces and opposition protesters stepped up clashes on Wednesday in the city of Isfahan, the birthplace of Iran’s top dissident cleric, Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri. Montazeri’s death this past weekend, and the rituals marking his passing, coincide with a new push by regime opponents during a 10-day religious commemoration.

The government has responded by harassing two reformist clerics who could replace Montazeri, as well as stripping the opposition’s top political figure – Mir Hossein Mousavi – of his sole official post.

In Isfahan, pro-regime basiji militiamen used batons, chains, and stones to beat mourners who gathered at the city’s main mosque to remember Montazeri, the spiritual mentor of the Iranian opposition, whose websites reported the clashes.

“While people were reciting the Quran [in the mosque], plainclothed forces attacked them and threw tear gas into the mosque yard and sprayed those inside with pepper spray after they closed the doors,” reported the reformist Parlemannews. “They severely beat the people inside,” then doused the clerical speaker with pepper spray and arrested him.

“Tens of thousands gathered outside for the memorial but were savagely attacked by security forces and the basijis,” witness Farid Salavati told the Associated Press. He said that dozens were injured as riot police and vigilantes clubbed and kicked men and women alike – some in the face – and arrested 50 people who had gathered to mourn the grand ayatollah.

Montazeri – the chosen successor of Iran’s first supreme leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, until a falling out in 1989 – had been unrelenting in his criticism of the officially declared reelection of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad last June, as well as of Iran’s current Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

“Khamenei is a murderer, his rule is invalid,” protesters shouted on Wednesday, referring to violence since June, in which severe force has been used against Iranians who marched to reverse the official result. They wanted to see the “Green Movement” presidential candidate, Mr. Mousavi, elected. Scores died in June and thousands were arrested; protests have flared repeatedly around the nation since then.

In Isfahan, the clashes on Wednesday portend more violence, as protesters and pro-government forces alike prepare for the religious peak of the Shiite calendar, Ashura, which falls on Sunday. By the end of the day on Wednesday, it was reported that the governor had announced a state of emergency and reportedly called in the military for help.

“The regime has no alternative but to try to block the commemorations of Grand Ayatollah Montazeri, because it has been state policy to demote him,” says Mehrdad Khonsari of the Center for Arab and Iranian Studies in London. “But given the events of the last six months, this only aggravates the situation [and] becomes a catalyst for more protests and is counter-productive.

“Every demonstration is a dress rehearsal for the next demonstration. Once Ashura is over next week, there will be more demonstrations,” says Mr. Khonsari. “The fact is there is no likelihood that these protests are going to come to an end anytime soon.”

See also:
Police, protesters clash in southern Iran
Iran forces clash with cleric’s mourners: websites
Iran: unrest reported in Isfahan
Iran warns that it will deal ‘fiercely’ with protesters
Iran security forces clash with protesters in Isfahan
Iranian security forces suppress new wave of opposition protests in Isfahan
Isfahan beset by violence
Iran behaves increasingly like a ‘police state’: US
Iran Beats Mourners, Signaling Harder Line
Esfahan / Isfahan Nuclear Technology Center N32°40′ E51°40′
Esfahan (Isfahan) Nuclear Technology Center
Could This Be A Tipping Point?

It looks like this coming weekend might be shaping up as the largest nationwide Iranian opposition protest yet and, judging by recent events, it could also be the bloodiest. I can only hope, especially after reading this, that all the Green Movement pain won’t be in vain and these protests eventually reach the point of no return, critical mass, the overthow of the Iranian mullahs, regime change.

/Go Green!

Squelching Dissent, When Free Speech Becomes An Enemy Of The State

Venezuela to Add Charge Against Globovision, Cabello Says

Venezuela will open a sixth administrative proceeding against the Globovision television network and will “inspect” 29 radio stations after some media outlets supported marches against the government this week.

Diosdado Cabello, who as minister of public works and housing oversees the state telecommunications regulator, announced the measures today in a speech at a pro-government march in downtown Caracas shown on state television.

Cabello took 34 radio stations off the air July 31 and opened five earlier proceedings against Globovision. He said today that the mass media were behind marches against President Hugo Chavez around the world yesterday and a thousands-strong march through Caracas today by foes of Chavez.

State-run Venezolana de Television spent the day showing images of the pro-Chavez rally where Cabello spoke. Globovision broadcast from the opposition march for hours. Other news broadcasts showed both marches.

Cabello said he had ordered that Globovision be charged over viewer messages that scroll across the screen during a talk show. He said the station allows viewers to post messages in favor of violently overthrowing Chavez while filtering messages critical of Globovision.

See also:
Chavez minister vows more Venezuela radio closings
Venezuela opens new probe into anti-Chavez TV, announces 29 more broadcasters will be closed
Venezuela opens new probe into anti-Chavez TV
Critics denounce Venezuela’s Chavez in multi-city protests from Argentina to Honduras
“No More Chávez” worldwide rally begins
Venezuela rivals march in Caracas

And, in a disturbing, eerily parallel tangent to this story, check out who praises Hugo Chavez and admires the way he handles the Venezuelan media.

Now, you may ask yourself, who the hell is Mark Lloyd? Well, he’s the Obama administration’s Associate General Counsel and Chief Diversity Officer at the Federal Communications Commission.

Chavez comes to the FCC

If for a moment you thought the Obama administration was going to sit there placidly while some on talk radio were so bold as to criticize its actions, think again, because here comes Mark Lloyd, the new diversity officer of the Federal Communications Commission and a man with a mission.

It’s not a pretty mission, not if you value free speech, but it is a mission made clear by Mr. Lloyd’s own words.

There he was in 2008, participating in a conference on “media reform,” telling us what a wonderful leader Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez was and wincing at an unpleasantness the dictator had to deal with, the uppity owners of media, people who had some objections in mind.

He spoke of Mr. Chavez’s “incredible revolution, a democratic revolution,” and of the “property owners and the folks who then controlled the media in Venezuela” who “rebelled” and who “worked to oust him.” Still, said Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Chavez “came back with another revolution, and then … began to take very seriously the media in his country.”

Dang those property owners. Aren’t they a pain? Mr. Lloyd seems to think they are a pain in this country, too, at least those who own radio stations. As much becomes clear when you read a report he and some others produced for a left-wing think tank that said conservatives dominate talk radio, not because they are more popular than liberals, as the evidence clearly shows, but because most station owners are white men who apparently heed their monolithic ideology more than the marketplace and their pocketbooks.

The solution to this supposed problem? The report advised limiting how many stations can be owned, which means you would take property away from some people. You would get a lot tougher on renewing licenses of those who don’t play the game according to profit-eroding, make-local-groups-happy rules, and you would assess enormous fees to give money to public radio if there was insufficient saluting of all this. It adds up to go broke or go broke.

Do you maybe begin to see that Mr. Lloyd is not as distant as you might like from Mr. Chavez, who has been happily revoking radio licenses of the politically non-compliant in his country? To Mr. Lloyd, as he wrote in a 2006 book quoted in an Internet article, the whole free speech thing is at any rate a bit of a fraud meant to serve global corporations and obstruct policies of the kind our society needs.

See also:
Don’t call this ‘diversity’
FCC’s New Hire Targeted Conservative Radio Stations in Writings
Two surprising appointments by Obama administration
Mark Lloyd – the Federal Communication Commission’s Chief Diversity Officer

/if you’re a free speech advocate, Mark Lloyd, given his public pronouncements and published writings about the media, seems to be an odd, even scary, choice to be appointed to his current FCC position by the Obama administration, is there an agenda here?