Where’s The Video?

This is pretty cool, if it’d not a hoax.

Guy Builds Working Hoverbike That Currently Only Hovers

Chris Malloy built a hoverbike that he claims could theoretically reach speeds of 173 mph and a height of more than 10,000 feet, due to its high thrust-to-weight ratio. Right now? It only hovers about three feet off the ground while tethered to the ground. Malloy worked two years to achieve this feat, which may seem like quite a long time only to get the hover part of the hoverbike working, but Malloy did this himself in his garage.

See also:
BMW Hover Bike, is it Real?
Australian Unveils Prototype Hoverbike
We Love: Homemade Hoverbike
OMFG! A Hoverbike. Seriously, a hoverbike
Crazy Hoverbike Is Capable of Flying to 10,000 Feet
Buy The Hoverbike Of The Future For $40,000
OH MY GOD: This Hoverbike Really Works and You Can Buy It
Another Star Wars dream come true – the hoverbike

Could this really be the next best thing to a Star Wars land speeder?

/only time will tell I guess, if the hoverbike is real, they’ll sell a lot of them

Your Paper’s Ringing, Are You Going To Bend It?

Do cell phones really need to be thinner, smaller, and bendable?

‘Paper iPhone’ could be next mobile revolution

A pocket-sized computer as thin and flexible as a sheet of paper is set to be unveiled next week. While it’s just a prototype, the researchers say the bendy souped-up smartphone could revolutionize the way we interact with computers.

Called PaperPhone, the new device is a flexible version of e-ink, the digital ink screen found in e-readers such as the Amazon Kindle.

“This computer looks, feels and operates like a small sheet of interactive paper,” said lead PaperPhone creator Roel Vertegaal, the director of Queen’s University Human Media Lab. “You interact with it by bending it into a cell phone, flipping the corner to turn pages, or writing on it with a pen.”

See also:
World’s First Flexible Smartphone Invented in Canada
Researchers demonstrate flexible epaper phone
Is your iPhone obsolete? Meet PaperPhone
Flexible phone made from electronic paper to debut
Canadian lab unveils Paperphone: flat, flexible smartphone
First flexible smartphone made of electronic paper to debut [VIDEO]
‘PaperPhone’: Cellphone of the Future?
iPhone to Paper Phone: Smartphone prototype made with interactive paper
The smartphone concept that bends all the rules
Ultra-thin ‘PaperPhone’ bends to user’s will
Queen’s University team designs bendable computer that it sees replacing paper
Paper-thin computer set to redefine industry

This is interesting technology but, in my opinion, it’s a solution looking for a problem. It seems to me that using “bending” commands would require more physical effort than pushing, pinching, or sliding fingers across a touchscreen.

/then again, what do I know, I don’t even own a cell phone

A New Space Capsule For Not Going To The Moon

The original reason for developing Orion was to return to the moon as part of the Constellation Program, but Obama canceled that idea.

NASA’s Orion capsule, testing center unveiled

The first version of NASA’s new manned Orion space capsule is ready to begin a series of rigorous trials, in preparation for the vehicle’s first test flight in 2013.

NASA’s prime contractor for Orion, the aerospace firm Lockheed Martin, unveiled the prototype spacecraft and a spacious, state-of-the-art testing center Tuesday near Denver. Lockheed’s Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) will put Orion through various paces, testing its navigation, ranging, descent and landing systems, among other features.

“Lockheed Martin built this remarkable facility to develop and test spacecraft systems, further demonstrating our commitment to improve safety and advance capabilities for future U.S. human spaceflight,” John Karas, vice president and general manager for Lockheed’s human spaceflight programs, said in a statement.

See also:
NASA Space Capsule Begins Tests at New Proving Ground
NASA’s Orion Moon Craft Unveiled at New Spaceflight Facility
NASA’s Orion begins road to space travel
Lockheed Martin unveils first Orion spacecraft
Lockheed Unveils Orion Space Vehicle
Lockheed Martin Unveils First Orion Spacecraft
Lockheed reveals new simulation center, Orion spacecraft
The Future Of Space Exploration Takes Step Forward In Littleton
Lockheed Martin unveils Orion test facility
Lockheed Martin unveils Colorado training center for Orion
NASA – Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle
Orion (spacecraft)

Apparently, the Orion will be relegated to serving as an incredibly expensive emergency escape vehicle for the International Space Station, if the ISS is still even around sometime after 2013, when Orion might first be operational.

/you’d think we’d at least consider using Orion to ferry our astronauts to the ISS and back, instead of having to rely on the Russians, who keep jacking up the price, but no, apparently not

It’s A Bird, It’s Not A Plane, It’s A Spy Drone!

This would make an awesome cat toy!

Hummingbird spy drone developed for DARPA

Under a contract from DARPA, AeroVironment Unmanned Aircraft Systems has created a hummingbird spy drone, the first two-wing, flapping-wing aircraft that carries its own energy source and can hover as well as move forwards.

The Nano Hummingbird can climb and descend vertically and fly sideways, forwards and backwards, as well as rotating clockwise and counter-clockwise, under remote control and carrying a video camera payload.

During a demonstration, the Nano Hummingbird flew in and out of a building through a normal-size doorway.

The hand-made prototype has a wingspan of 6.5 inches tip-to-tip and weighs less than an AA battery. It can be fitted with a removable body fairing, shaped like a real hummingbird and about the same size.

See also:
It’s a bird! It’s a spy! It’s both
Robot Hummingbird Spy Drone Flies for Eight Minutes, Spies on Bad Guys
US robot ornithopter spy-hummingbird in flight test triumph
Spy tech: DARPA demonstrates Nano Hummingbird spy drone
DARPA Backs Hummingbird Like Spy Robot
Small hummingbird aircraft flaps like a bird, weighs less than a Duracell
Next post Video: Hummingbird Drone Does Loop-de-Loop
Tiny ‘Hummingbird’ May Someday Fly Spy Missions For The Military
Robotic hummingbird is right out of a James Bond film
Technology: James Bond’s hummingbird
Bird Bond: ‘Nano Hummingbird’ Drone Takes Spying to the Sky
Tiny robotic bird is latest in gov’t spy gear
AV’s ‘hummingbird’ aircraft displays maneuverability
Watch a hummingbird-shaped spy drone flutter around, steal your secrets
AeroVironment, Inc.: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Although this is a prodigious display of technological achievement, there’s a major drawback to developing a hummingbird spy drone, hummingbirds are only found in North, South, and Central America. So, besides Venezuela, it’s pretty much worthless for covert spying against almost all the global enemies of the United States.

/now, if they could reduce it down to insect size . . .

Get Your Physics Fun While It Lasts

They just restarted the LHC about a week ago and now they’re already announcing it needs to be shut down again. I bet that right about now they wish the could return it and get their $5 billion back. What a gigantic boondoggle. As I’ve said before, they should have had the Germans build it in the first place.

LHC to shut down for a year to address design faults

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must close at the end of 2011 for up to a year to address design issues, according to an LHC director.

Dr Steve Myers told BBC News the faults will delay the machine reaching its full potential for two years.

The atom smasher will reach world record collision energies later this month at 7 trillion electron volts.

But joints between the machine’s magnets must be strengthened before higher-energy collisions can commence.

The Geneva-based machine only recently restarted after being out of action for 14 months following an accident in September 2008.

Dr Myers said: “It’s something that, with a lot more resources and with a lot more manpower and quality control, possibly could have been avoided but I have difficulty in thinking that this is something that was a design error.”

He said: “The standard phrase is that the LHC is its own prototype. We are pushing technologies towards their limits.”

“You don’t hear about the thousands or hundreds of thousands of other areas that have gone incredibly well.

“With a machine like the LHC, you only build one and you only build it once.”

He said the second problem is not with the most complex technology but involves the copper sheaths around the superconducting joints in the tunnel.

The copper sheaths are a failsafe mechanism designed to take up the current if one of the magnets in the Large Hadron Collider warms up – an incident known as a “quench”.

The 2008 accident caused one tonne of helium to leak into the tunnel and resulted in a series of “quenches” and a 40m Swiss franc (£24m) repair bill.

Engineers believe the machine is now safe to run at 7 trillion electron volts (TeV) but are anxious to avoid another breakdown.

So they have taken the decision to run the machine for 18 to 24 months at half-maximum power before switching it off for a year to carry out improvements to the 27km tunnel.

Dr Myers said the decision was taken jointly with the physicists working on the four giant particle detectors on the LHC.

He said they appreciate the chance to test their own equipment while the machine is running at half its maximum power.

See also:
Large Hadron Collider to close for a year for refit and repairs
Large Hadron Collider ‘to shut down for a year’
Hadron Collider to be closed amid fears of a very big bang
CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, world’s largest atom-smasher, needs to be shut down for repairs
Large Hadron Collider will finally reach full power in 2013… eight years behind schedule
Collider to shut down at end of 2011
Large Hadron Collider shutdown planned
Large Hadron Collider to shut down, not baguette this time
Scientists rubbish stories about LHC shutdown over safety concerns
Woman, fearing apocalypse, tries to halt collider
Woman fails to shut down Large Hadron Collider
Here We Go Again

As they say, measure twice, cut once.

/on the bright side, at least while it’s shut down again, they won’t have to pay the ridiculously high electric bill for all the vast amounts of power that the LHC sucks down while in operation