Not Good For A Secular Turkey

If you thought Turkey was already an unreliable NATO ally, this won’t help.

Turkey: Military chiefs resign en masse

The chief of the Turkish armed forces, Isik Kosaner, has resigned along with the army, navy and air force heads.

They were furious about the arrest of senior officers, accused of plotting, shortly before a round of military promotions.

A series of meetings between General Kosaner and PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan failed to resolve their differences.

Turkish President Abdullah Gul moved quickly to appoint General Necdet Ozel as the new army chief.

Gen Ozel is widely expected to be swiftly elevated to chief of the general staff in place of Gen Kosaner. Tradition dictates that only the head of the army can take over the top job.

There has been a history of tension between the secularist military and the governing AK party, with the two sides engaged in a war of words for the past two years over allegations that parts of the military had been plotting a coup.

See also:
In Turkey, top military figures apparently resign en masse
Turkey’s military has at last stood aside
Turkey’s top generals resign in apparent rift with Erdogan government
Turkey’s military chiefs of staff resign
Turkish military’s chiefs of staff step down
Turkey’s top military leaders resign in protest of staff arrestsTurkey’s resignations, a sign of military decline
Turkey’s military chiefs quit ahead of key meeting
How Turkey’s military upheaval will affect NATO
Turkey’s reset
Analysis: Turkish government strengthens control on military
Government prepares for major overhaul of Turkish military
A Prime Minister’s Push Reshapes Turkish Politics

Traditionally, in Turkey, the military has served as check on Islamist forces and a key to maintaining a secular government.

/obviously, this development represents a substantial consolidation of power in the hands of Erdogan’s Islamist AK party and a big blow to the future of secularism in Turkey

An American Tradition, For Better Or Worse

The winner and five time consecutive champion . . .

Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest 2011: Who Is to Blame for Its Popularity?

The 2011 Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest was won by a familiar face, as it was Joey Chestnut taking home his fifth consecutive Mustard Belt. In 10 minutes, Chestnut finished off 62 hot dogs, six short of the world record he set in 2009.

No wonder they call him “Jaws.” His parents must be very proud.

As is always the case, there were plenty of people on hand to take in the scene at Coney Island, and many more took it in on ESPN. I haven’t found or heard any exact figures, but last year’s contest drew 40,000 spectators and was watched by nearly 1.7 million people on TV. One assumes those numbers only increased this year.

See also:
Joey Chestnut wins another hot dog title
Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest 2011, Full Results: Joey Chestnut Outlasts Deep Dish, Eater X, B.O.B
Joey Chestnut wins Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest for fifth time
Nathan’s hot dog eating contest in Coney Island: Chestnut downs 62 dogs to win
Joey Chestnut: “Winning tastes pretty good”
Hot dog eating contest: Joey Chestnut wins fifth straight, Kobayashi unofficially breaks world record with 69
Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island
Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest 2011
Chestnut, ‘Black Widow’ win annual hot dog eating contestAlexandria woman wins Nathan’s hot-dog eating contest
Korean-American Woman Ranks as U.S. Hot Dog Queen

Mnnn, hot dogs. 62 in ten minutes that about a hat dog and bun every ten seconds.

/makes me a bit queasy just thinking about it