Sentinel Down

And yet again, after leaving behind a cutting edge stealth helicopter during the bin Laden raid, the U.S. conducts another, involuntary, state-of-the-art military technology transfer to the enemy.

Iran’s capture of US drone shines light on spy mission, but may reveal little

The Iranian capture of a high-tech, stealth U.S. drone shines a light on the American spying mission there, but probably doesn’t tell Tehran much that it didn’t already know, a senior U.S. official said.

The RQ-170 Sentinel was providing surveillance over Iran and didn’t just accidentally wander away from the Afghanistan border region, as first suggested. The official said Wednesday that the Iranians will no doubt be able to tell where the aircraft flew. A bigger U.S. concern, the official said, was that the Iranians are likely to share or sell whatever they have recovered of the aircraft to the Chinese, Russians or others. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the mission.

Experts and officials acknowledge that there is no self-destruct mechanism on the Sentinels — which are used both by the military and the CIA for classified surveillance and intelligence gathering missions.

. . .

U.S. officials said that while they have enough information to confirm that Iran does have the wreckage, they said they are not sure what the Iranians will be able to glean technologically from what they found. It is unlikely that Iran would be able to recover any surveillance data from the aircraft.

See also:
US admits downed drone spied on Iran
Iran says US spy drone was flying deep inside its airspace when it was downed
Malfunction likely put U.S. drone in Iranian hands
Iran Probably Did Capture a Secret U.S. Drone
U.S. Military Sources: Iran Has Missing U.S. Drone
Drone that crashed in Iran may give away U.S. secrets
China, Russia want to inspect downed U.S. drone
Sentinel unmanned drone lost in Iran among US most valuable warfare assets
Drone belonged to CIA, officials say
Downed drone was on CIA mission
Officials: Drone downed in Iran on CIA mission
Drone Lost in Iran Was Joint CIA-Military Reconnaissance Plane
Iran’s downing of U.S. drone rattles Washington
US ‘concerned’ over drone lost near Iran border
Experts: Iran capture of stealth drone no worry
US considered missions to destroy RQ-170 Sentinel drone lost in Iran
Spy drone may provide little help to Iran
U.S. debated sending commandos into Iran to recover drone
U.S. Made Covert Plan to Retrieve Iran Drone
Iran: The Stealth War Continues
Drone Drama Proves Iran Is Ready to Rumble
Stealth drone highlights tougher U.S. strategy on Iran
U.S. drones have been spying on Iran for years

The good news is that we seem to be paying close attention to what Iran is up to, have been for years, and can penetrate Iranian airspace with near impunity. These past and, hopefully, ongoing intelligence gathering and surveillance activities should help provide a detailed blueprint for when push comes to shove and Iran has to be dealt with militarily, which is sure to eventually become a necessity.

/that said, it’s a total unforced strategic error to just let Iran have this advanced technology drone, to share with or sell to other potential enemies of the United States, would it have killed us, if we didn’t want to risk lives to recover the Sentinel, to at least launch an airstrike package to obliterate the wreckage?

Slum Wars

Well, Brazil has the World Cup and the Olympics coming up in a few years, the status quo can’t stand.

23 dead since Sunday in Brazil slum violence

Violence including clashes between police and drug gangs in the slums of Rio de Janeiro has killed 23 people since Sunday, with 188 people arrested or detained so far, military police said Thursday.

It was not immediately clear whether all the dead were gang members or whether civilians and police were among the fatalities.

The continuing unrest stems from the transfer of prisoners from local institutions to federal lockups in other states, the government-run Agencia Brasil news outlet reported, citing Rio de Janeiro Public Security Secretary Jose Mariano Beltrame. Some of the prisoners being transferred ordered the violence by drug gangs, Beltrame said.

Also factoring into the situation was a police effort to remove some drug gang members from Rio’s crime-ridden slums, called favelas.

See also:
Tanks Roll Into Rio Slum Amid Drug Battles
Military vehicles enter Brazil slum
Brazil Marines join slum battles, 30 people killed
Rio police targeting slum where gang based
Brazilian Authorities Target Slum in Rio Crime Crackdown
Military deploys armoured vehicles in Rio
Rio favela violence: The two rival factions behind the violence
Armored carriers deployed in Rio crime crackdown
Rio police targeting slum where gang based

This is what happens when the Government, ether purposely or through benign neglect, cedes control of state territory to enclaves and no go zones. Eventually, to avoid embarrassment and reestablish the law and order of the majority, the enclaves have to be retaken, and at great cost. It’s cheaper just to maintain law and order in the first place and not let these areas exist and fester.

/it’ll eventually happen here, Dearborn, Michigan comes to mind