Afghans Must Get Stoned

The barbarity that is Sharia law strikes again, this time in Afghanistan, administered Taliban style.

‘Modern’ Life In Afghanistan — Stoned to Death for Being In Love

Earlier today, on the cusp of the second decade of the twenty-first century, the Afghan Taliban treated the world to a display of Islamic (Sharia) law. They proudly sentenced two human beings to be publicly stoned to death by a mob of two hundred men who were only too happy to do so, a mob which included the relatives of both victims as well as bystanders galore.

The couple’s crime was that of loving each other and wanting to marry. However, the woman refused to marry the relative to whom she had already been promised. Thus, they had both rebelled against cultural, tribal, and religious expectations.

The couple, 25-year-old Khayyam and 19-year-old Siddiqa ran away. Both were lured back home by relatives who promised them that permission would be granted for them to marry. It was a ruse. Once back, they were subjected to Afghan Islamic justice, Taliban-style and were stoned to death. Siddiqa was forced to wear her burqa to her execution.

See also:
Afghan couple stoned to death by crowd that included relatives
Death by stoning returns as Taliban punish couple who tried to elope
Taliban stone couple for adultery in Afghanistan
In Bold Display, Taliban Order Stoning Deaths
Amnesty International Confirms and Condems Afghan Stoning
Romeo and Juliet Stoned to Death
Stoning Of Afghan Couple For Adultery Sparks Debate On Shari’a Law
Karzai condemns stoning deaths by Taliban
Iranians Must Get Stoned

That’s right, two people were executed by a bloodthirsty, rock throwing mob for the crime of being in love.

/just how [expletive deleted], sick, twisted, evil, amoral, and deranged is a “religion” that condones this sort of affront to human civilization?

In Your Face Taliban, The Coalition Is Coming To Take Marjah And There’s Not A Damn Thing You Can Do About It

U.S. Announces Helmand Offensive

In a rare break from traditional military secrecy, the U.S. and its allies are announcing the precise target of their first big offensive of the Afghanistan surge in an apparent bid to intimidate the Taliban.

Coalition officers have been hinting aloud for months that they plan to send an overwhelming Afghan, British and U.S. force to clear insurgents from the town of Marjah and surrounding areas in Helmand province, and this week the allies took the unusual step of issuing a press release saying the attack was “due to commence.”

Senior Afghan officials went so far as to hold a news conference Tuesday to discuss the offensive, although the allies have been careful not to publicize the specific date or details of the attack.

“If we went in there one night and all the insurgents were gone and we didn’t have to fire a shot, that would be a success,” a coalition spokesman, Col. Wayne Shanks, said before the announcement. “I don’t think there has been a mistake in letting people know we’re planning on coming in.”

The risks could be substantial, however. By surrendering the element of surprise, the coalition has given its enemy time to dig entrenched fighting positions and tunnel networks. Perhaps worse for the attacking infantrymen, the insurgents have had time to booby-trap buildings and bury bombs along paths, roads and irrigated fields. Such hidden devices inflict the majority of U.S. and allied casualties.

Over the past few months, the new allied commander in southern Afghanistan, British Maj. Gen. Nick Carter, has revamped NATO’s coalition strategy in a region that is home to the Pashtun tribes and opium poppy fields that form the ethnic and financial foundations of the Taliban insurgency.

With the first of 30,000 new U.S. troops already on the ground in Afghanistan, Gen. Carter’s plan is to focus on two population centers—Kandahar city, in Kandahar province, and central Helmand province to the west. Combined, they are home to about two million of the estimated three million residents of southern Afghanistan.

Still, the military has taken an unusual step by broadcasting its imminent intention to assault a particular town, Marjah, and its environs. During World War II, civilians and servicemen were frequently reminded that “Loose lips sink ships” and “Enemy ears are listening.” For months leading up to the D-Day landings on June 6, 1944, the Allies went to great lengths to disguise their target.

Similarly, the coalition in Afghanistan normally forbids—at the threat of expulsion—embedded reporters from writing about events before they take place. In this case, though, officials even released the name of the offensive, Operation Moshtarak, and said it would be a joint Afghan-coalition attack. Moshtarak means “together” in Dari, although the bulk of the population in southern Afghanistan speaks Pashto.

See also:
Allies publicly target Taliban
Coalition troops brace for biggest offensive since start of Afghan war
Marines gear up for push into Afghan Taliban enclave
Marines prepare to storm Taliban stronghold
US Marines, Afghan and NATO forces brace for battle in Afghan Taliban stronghold
US marines plan attack on Taleban stronghold
US, NATO, Afghan Troops Planning Major Southern Offensive
Troops Prepare and Publicize Offensive Against Taliban
Afghanistan: US and British to launch biggest offensive since 2001
U.S. Plans Defense of Kandahar

An interesting Coalition strategy indeed, will the Taliban flee in humiliation or flock to Marjah and die en masse? The overhead drones will surely be watching.

/either way, we’re taking the town