Aiming With Jesus

Michigan defense contractor has God in its sights

Combat rifle sights used by U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan carry references to Bible verses, stoking concerns about whether the inscriptions break a government rule that bars proselytizing by American troops.

Military officials said the citations don’t violate the ban and they won’t stop using the telescoping sights, which allow troops to pinpoint the enemy day or night.

The contractor that makes the equipment, Trijicon of Wixom, Mich., said the U.S. military has been a customer since 1995 and the company has never received any complaints about the Scripture citations.

“We don’t publicize this,” Tom Munson, Trijicon’s director of sales and marketing, said in an interview. “It’s not something we make a big deal out of. But when asked, we say, ‘Yes, it’s there.'”

The inscriptions are subtle and appear in raised lettering at the end of the stock number. Trijicon’s rifle sights use tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen, to create light and help shooters hit what they’re aiming for.

Markings on the Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight, which is standard issue to U.S. special operations forces, include “JN8:12,” a reference to John 8:12: “When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.‘”

The Trijicon Reflex sight is stamped with 2COR4:6, a reference to part of the second letter of Paul to the Corinthians: “For God, who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ made his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ.”

Wixom firm defends rifle sights with Bible verses

A Wixom-based company, Trijicon, that makes weapons for the U.S. military has come under fire for inscribing biblical references on rifle sights it produces.

But the company defended the practice, saying in a statement released today that “as part of our faith and our belief in service to our country, Trijicon has put scripture references on our products for more than two decades.”

“For two generations our Michigan-based family owned business has been working to provide America’s military men and women with high quality, innovative sighting systems for the weapons they use,” the company said in a statement released by Levick Strategic Communications in Washington D.C.

“Our effort is simple and straightforward: to help our servicemen and women win the war on terror and come home safe to their families. … As long as we have men and women in danger, we will continue to do everything we can to provide them with both state-of-the-art technology and the never-ending support and prayers of a grateful nation.

See also:
U.S. Military Weapons Inscribed With Secret ‘Jesus’ Bible Codes
Wixom firm’s military gunsights include biblical references
US troops issued with gun sights carrying coded references to Bible passages
U.S Military Uses Weapons With Biblical Inscriptions
In video, rifle reviewer touts Christian scope
Michigan weapons company Trijicon takes flak over soldiers’ rifle scopes branded with Bible verses
Objections to Marines’ Bible-coded rifle sights
Marine Corps Concerned About ‘Jesus Guns,’ Will Meet With Trijicon
Gunsights’ biblical references concern US and UK forces
U.S. Army to review defense contractor’s practice of putting Bible verses onto rifle sights
Trijicon, Inc. : Brilliant Aiming Solutions

It’s real hard for me to get worked up over this. It’s just a small, unpublicized code stamped into the casing at the end of the stock number, not whole Bible verses. That it took two decades for someone to figure it out and complain about it shows just how much of a tempest in a teapot this issue is. Our money has references to God all over it, yet we still carry it around every day.

Actually, if you read the Bible verses referred to by the codes, it’s pretty clever. They refer to light out of darkness. Light amplification sights, light out of darkness, get it?

/the atheists can always use the factory issue iron sights if they don’t like it, problem solved

Something’s Happening Here, What It Is Ain’t Exactly Clear

Wal-Mart’s glow-in-the-dark mystery

It began in late 2007 as a routine audit. Retail giant Wal-Mart noticed that some exit signs at the company’s stores and warehouses had gone missing.

As the audit spread across Wal-Mart’s U.S. operations, the mystery thickened. Stores from Arkansas to Washington began reporting missing signs. They numbered in the hundreds at first, then the thousands. Last month Wal-Mart disclosed that about 15,800 of its exit signs – a stunning 20 per cent of its total inventory – are lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for at 4,500 facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico.

Poor housekeeping, certainly, but what’s the big deal?

In a word: radiation.

The signs contain tritium gas, a radioactive form of hydrogen. Tritium glows when it interacts with phosphor particles, a phenomenon that has led to the creation of glow-in-the-dark emergency exit signs.

. . .

And what about exposure from thousands of signs dumped near a source of drinking water, or packed with explosives in the back of a truck that has been driven into a crowded building?

“I’m sure thousands of them would create a credible dirty bomb,” says Norm Rubin, director of nuclear research at Energy Probe in Toronto. “Most experts think the main purpose of a dirty bomb is to cause panic, disruption and expensive cleanup rather than lots of dead bodies. A bunch of tritium, especially if oxidized in an explosion, would probably do that job fine.”

ENVIRONMENT: Wal-Mart’s Mysterious Missing Exit Signs: A Tritium Health Risk?

What do Home Depot, the Mormon Church, and the U.S. Coast Guard have in common?

Answer: Radioactivity.

According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the construction retailer, the church denomination, and the guardians of our coastline own hundreds of fluorescent exit signs containing the radioactive gas tritium. So, in fact, do various school districts, retail stores, and federal and state agencies. And if the signs are handled and disposed of improperly, tritium could make its way into our drinking water. The NRC was prompted to step in following Wal-Mart’s recent disclosure that 15,000 tritium exit signs have mysteriously disappeared from its stores nationwide.

On January 16, the NRC sent notices to 61 organizations that own 500 or more tritium signs to check the signs against their records and report any lost or missing signs to the agency. The recipients of the “demand for information” letter include the Department of the Navy, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Postal Service, and the West Point Military Academy, as well as several pharmaceutical, defense, and aviation companies nationwide.

In all, more than two million tritium exit signs are estimated to be in use in the United States. The signs are popular because they do not require electricity and provide emergency light and direction during evacuations.

From 2001 to 2007, Wal-Mart bought 70,000 tritium exit signs to install in its stores and warehouses, according to the NRC. In 2007, after discovering that some signs had disappeared, the company started a nationwide audit of its facilities. The result: a staggering 15,000 signs were lost, missing, or otherwise unaccounted for.

An NRC advisory states that the tritium signs pose “little or no threat to the public health and safety and do not constitute a security risk.” Others are not so sure. “Fifteen thousand missing tritium exit signs at 20 trillion picocuries each means that 300 quadrillion picocuries of tritium could be making its way into people’s drinking water,” warns David Lochbaum, director of the Nuclear Safety Project at the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Or, nearly four million gallons of water could be contaminated above the EPA’s drinking water standards. And what if 15,000 missing tritium exit signs is a low estimate?”

/certainly nothing good can come of this