Mooky Rubs The U.S. Nose In The Iranian Victory In Iraq

After almost a decade in Iraq, after losing thousands of soldiers and spending hundreds of billions of dollars, the United States’ request to maintain even a minimal troop presence in Iraq after the end of 2011 was categorically rejected, in the end, effectively vetoed by close Iranian ally and long time U.S. nemesis, with plenty of U.S. blood on his hands, Muqtada al-Sadr. We got kicked out by Mooky, how absolutely humiliating is that?

Iraq’s Sadr calls for full US withdrawal

Head of Iraq’s Sadr movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, has called for the complete withdrawal of all American troops from the country by the end of the year.

Speaking in the holy city of Najaf on Wednesday, the cleric rejected any form of US presence in the country, as Washington and Baghdad are discussing keeping a limited number of US troops as military trainers in Iraq.

Sadr said the presence of US military trainers in Iraq beyond the Dec. 31 deadline is an ”organized occupation”.

He also dismissed any negotiation with the US before the full withdrawal of all foreign soldiers and the payment of compensation to the families of Iraqis killed by US troops.

Washington has been pressing Baghdad to agree to keep thousands of its troops beyond the 2011 deadline. It also wants the remaining troops to be granted immunity from prosecution.

See also:
Sadr rejects presence of US Military trainers in Iraq
Sadr bloc warns over keeping US military
Iraq’s move to revoke immunity for troops adds to US problems
After Nearly Nine Years of War and Occupation, America to Withdraw All Troops From Iraq
The U.S. Withdrawal from Iraq
U.S. role in Iraq comes to unsatisfying end
Timid leadership on US forces by Iraq’s politicians
As U.S.-Iraq troop talks faltered, Obama didn’t pick up the phone
With troops pulling out at year’s end, close U.S. Embassy in Iraq for diplomats’ safety
Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory
Risk Key US Gen calls Iraq pullout ‘disaster’
Overheard on CNN.com: Iraq not ours to ‘win’
Soldiers, Pundits Debate Whether Iraq War Was Worth It

If anyone tries to tell you that the U.S. pullout from Iraq, without a trace, after begging to stay and being curtly rebuffed, isn’t a huge victory for Iran, they’re either naive, confused, or lying. Iran will dominate Iraq, economically, militarily, politically, and socially after we’re gone. The majority of Iraq’s government is already aligned with Iran.

Does anyone seriously believe that a U.S. embassy, with less than 200 troops, has any chance of checking Iran’s influence in Iraq? Hell, we’ll be lucky if our embassy isn’t overrun. Iraq could very well become another Iranian satellite state, like Lebanon. And hey, you thought taking military action against Iran’s nuclear program was already difficult at best? Try it without any leverage over or military footprint in Iraq.

/Obama’s Iran/Iraq policy, “not with a bang, but a whimper”

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A Recipe For Disaster

Can you smell what Iran is cooking?

Key Iraqi Sunni Political Bloc Pulls Out of March 7 Parliamentary Election

A key Sunni political bloc declared Saturday that it would not take part in Iraq’s March 7 parliamentary election. Saleh al-Mutlak, who was banned from running by a parliamentary committee, is pulling his National Dialogue Front out of the election with just over a week to go before voting is set to begin.

The decision by veteran Sunni politician Saleh al-Mutlak to pull his political bloc out of the approaching election poses a severe blow to the Iraqi electoral process, and gives ammunition to adversaries of any compromise.

An appeals court recently upheld a decision by a parliamentary committee barring al-Mutlak from running, because of alleged ties to the Baath Party of deposed leader Saddam Hussein.

Mutlak’s spokesman, Haidar al-Mullah, told reporters that his National Dialogue Front was “boycotting the upcoming election” and urged other parties to do the same. He supported the decision by citing complaints by U.S. commander in Iraq General Ray Odierno and Ambassador Christopher Hill over Iranian interference in the electoral process.

The parliament committee which banned dozens of prominent Sunni candidates from running in the election is led by pro-Iranian politicians Ahmad Chalabi and Ali Faisal al-Lami. Chalabi denied, Friday, on Al Hurra TV, that Iran had any responsibility in the decision.

. . .

Top U.S. officials, as well as many Iraqi Sunni leaders, have accused Iran of pushing for the decision to ban key Sunni politicians from running in the election. Marina Ottaway thinks that it may be a “bit much to see the long arm of [Iranian] President [Mahmoud] Ahmedinejad” behind the current crisis, because Iraq, she says, “has never had much of a democratic tradition.”

Abou Diab, however, believes that the current political imbroglio has clear Iranian origins, and that Iran wants “to turn Iraq into a friendly client-state after the planned U.S. withdrawal,” next August.

See also:
Iraq party pulls out of vote
Popular Sunni political party to boycott Iraqi elections
Sunni party vows to boycott Iraqi elections
Fears of Iraq poll boycott after Sunni party pulls out
Sunni party to boycott Iraqi elections
Sunni bloc boycotts Iraq vote citing Iran interference
In Turmoil, Sunni Party in Iraq Calls for Vote Boycott
Secular party withdraws from Iraq’s elections
Sunni Bloc Boycotts Iraq Polls
Sunni party pulls out of Iraq elections
US envoy accuses Iran over poll ban
US general links Chalabi to Iran
Chalabi Tells General Odierno: ‘Mind Your Own Business’ – Iraq News Agency, Iraq
Iraqi former PM Allawi meets Saudi king ahead of polls

Remember Ahmed Chalabi? He was instrumental in providing us with the information (reports of weapons of mass destruction and Saddam’s alleged ties to al-Qaeda) that got us to invade Iraq and overthrow Saddam Hussein. Now, it appears that he’s trying to deliver control over Iraq to the Iranians after we leave. Have we been played as the world’s biggest suckers by Iran and her agents?

/wouldn’t it be a shame if Ahmed Chalabi were to suddenly go missing?