Who’s Shutting Down Minnesota?

The Republicans have already passed a budget, but Governor Dayton won’t sign on to the deal unless it includes tax increases, a demand Republicans will not accept. Who will blink first?

State shutdown would be a leap into unknown

In 19 days, Minnesotans could endure the most wide-reaching government shutdown in state history, with little sense of when it might end.

Across the vast enterprise of state government, agency heads are scrambling to come up with closure plans. State leaders have no real playbook for blinking off such an enormous government machine, so they must wade into an array of wrenching decisions and legal scuffles, knowing they risk turning Minnesota into a national spectacle of partisan gridlock.

“We the citizens will lose immeasurably,” said former Gov. Arne Carlson, adding that Minnesota could become a test case for a wave of shutdowns in politically deadlocked states. “It raises serious questions about where America is going and where Minnesota is going.”

See also:
A shutdown looms, questions linger
State layoff notices sent as questions dominate
Minn. workers warned about shutdown layoffs
Minnesota sends layoff notices to prep for shutdown
Government shutdown would mean hiring freeze
OPINION | A shutdown ain’t nothin’ but a shutdown
No good from shutdown
AFSCME Urges Minn. GOP Lawmakers to Compromise, Avoid Shutdown
New lawmakers willing to negotiate, but not on taxes or total spending
A Q & A about Minnesota budget, possible shutdown

If the Minnesota government shuts down, who will be responsible or, to put it another way, who should take the blame? To find the answer, let’s go back to the 2010 election. Minnesota voters, for the first time in four decades, overwhelmingly swept the Republicans into control of both chambers of the legislature. Mark Dayton, on the other hand, was barely elected Governor by the narrowest of margins after a close recount. The message Minnesotans sent was crystal clear, they want lower taxes and less government spending, period. Minnesota is already one of the most highly taxed states, additional taxes would only make the state less economically competitive.

/so take your tax increase fixation and shove it up your ass Governor Dayton, the people have spoken, the Republicans have passed a budget, and if the Minnesota government shuts down, it’s your [expletive deleted] fault!

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Have We Attacked China Yet?

No sooner was it publicly revealed that the United States would now treat damaging cyberattacks by other nations as an act of war, threatening retaliation with conventional weapons, the new, bold, some say foolish, policy, was immediately put to the test.

China Google hackers’ goal: Spying on U.S. Govt.

It’s the second time Google has blamed a major computer hacking scheme on China, reports CBS News correspondent Wyatt Andrews.

This time Google says unknown hackers from Jinan, China, a city with a military command center, stole the personal Gmail passwords of hundreds of senior U.S .government officials.

Google said the hackers’ “goal” was to eavesdrop on the officials — “to monitor the content of the users’ emails.”

That suggestion — of spying — rang alarm bells in the Administration.

“These allegations are very serious,” said Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. “We take them seriously. We’re looking into them.”

See also:
Clinton: Google’s China Hacking Claims ‘Very Serious’
Hillary Clinton says FBI will probe Gmail hacker attack
US Investigating Google Claim of China Hacking
FBI Investigating Google Claim that China Hacked Them
Google breach gives way to diplomatic, high-tech tensions
China Denies Accessing High Profile Gmail Accounts
Google’s groundless accuses hurt global trust on Internet
The Google-China Saga Continues
Admin: Gmail phishers stalked victims for months
Gmail Hack Targeted White House
Cyber war: Google, China in fresh spat over email hacking
Google, what exactly is the China connection for the phishing scare?
Is Google an agent of the US Government? It certainly gives that impression

So far, the U.S. has uncovered a successful espionage phishing expedition, against top level U.S. Government officials, tracked back to a specific Chinese city. Why aren’t we bombing China, isn’t this a perfect situation to show how our new military policy will treat hacking intrusions like this as acts of war? Unfortunately for us, China denies the attack and, as I pointed out yesterday, it’s extremely difficult to be absolutely sure as to the origins of cyberattacks like this, so we do nothing and our brand new policy looks foolish and radiates national weakness.

/instead of making toothless threats to send missile strikes in response to hack attacks, why don’t we just send the Chinese back a nice Stuxnet worm or take down Baidu with a complimentary DoS attack