Get Out And Vote Republicans!

Especially if you live in New Jersey, let’s try and keep the results out of the margin of fraud.

Christie leads

Chris Christie leads Jon Corzine 47-41 in PPP’s final poll of the New Jersey Governor’s race, with Chris Daggett at 11%.

Corzine had pulled to within a point of Christie on our poll three weeks ago after trailing by as many as 14 points over the summer, but his momentum has stalled since then and Christie’s built his lead back up to 4 points last week and now 6.

But, of course, if you’re a Republican in New Jersey, you already know that a six point lead against a Democrat candidate might not be safe.

Chris Christie’s Next Case: Who Stole My Election?

The race for governor in New Jersey is so close in final polls that it may well end up in a recount — the 1981 election did and was decided by less than 1,800 votes. If there is a recount, you can bet disputes about absentee ballots will loom large. Moreover, if serious allegations of fraud emerge, you can also expect less-than-vigorous investigation by the Obama Justice Department — which showed just how seriously it takes such allegations when it walked away from an open-and-shut voter intimidation case against the New Black Panther Party in Philadelphia earlier this year.

Plenty of reasons exist for suspecting absentee fraud may play a significant role in tomorrow’s Garden State contests. Groups associated with Acorn in neighboring Pennsylvania and New York appear to have moved into the state. An independent candidate for mayor in Camden has already leveled charges that voter fraud is occurring in his city. Meanwhile, the Democratic Party in New Jersey is taking advantage of a new loosely written vote-by-mail law to pressure county clerks not to vigorously use signature checks to evaluate the authenticity of absentee ballots, the only verification procedure allowed.

The state has received a flood of 180,000 absentee ballot requests. On some 3,000 forms the signature doesn’t match the one on file with county clerks. Yet citing concerns that voters would be disenfranchised, Democratic Party lawyer Paul Josephson wrote New Jersey’s secretary of state asking her “to instruct County Clerks not to deny applications on the basis of signature comparison alone.” Mr. Josephson maintained that county clerks “may be overworked and are likely not trained in handwriting analysis” and insisted that voters with suspect applications should be allowed to cast provisional ballots. Those ballots, of course, would then provide a pool of votes that would be subject to litigation in any recount, with the occupant of New Jersey’s highest office determined by Florida 2000-style scrutiny of ballot applications.

The cheaters are making a full court press.

ACORN Aims to Tip New Jersey Election in Corzine’s Favor

Fearing a potentially devastating Democratic loss, the highly controversial Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) group and its affiliated organizations are gearing up to tip the scales and re-elect embattled incumbent in the hard-fought New Jersey gubernatorial race, sources tell Newsmax.

“Acorn is heavily involved in Gov. Jon Corzine’s get-out-the-vote operation, but is maintaining a low profile at the insistence of the Corzine campaign,” Matthew Vadum, senior editor of the conservative Capitol Research Center think tank, tells Newsmax. “If Corzine manages to win reelection, he doesn’t want the victory tainted by his close association with Acorn.”

Wall Street Journal columnist and author John Fund wrote Tuesday that “Plenty of reasons exist for suspecting absentee fraud may play a significant role in tomorrow’s Garden State contests.”

See also:
GOP challenger edges ahead of Corzine in NJ
Bettors Split Between Corzine-Christie in New Jersey
Can Christie Beat the Other Boys In Jersey?
President Obama Robocalls for Gov. Corzine in New Jersey

And don’t forget to vote in New York 23.

Hoffman Leads in Upstate N.Y. House Race, but Many Undecided

In the upstate New York House race that has attracted national attention, Doug Hoffman, the Conservative Party candidate now embraced by the GOP, leads Democrat Bill Owens by 41 percent to 36 percent with 6 percent backing Republican Assemblywoman Dede Scozzafava, who dropped out of the race on Saturday, according to a Siena College poll conducted Nov. 1. Eighteen percent are undecided, The margin of error is 4 points.

The number of undecided voters is now double what it was in Siena’s last poll, when Scozzafava was still in the race.

“Hoffman continues to demonstrate momentum, picking up six points since Scozzafava pulled out,” said Siena’s Steven Greenberg. “It appears, however, that the majority of Scozzafava’s supporters have gone to neither Hoffman nor Owens, but rather into the undecided column.”

Showdown Alarms

The NY-23 special election on Tuesday has the attention of the White House at the highest levels, with White House sources saying that the endorsement of Democrat Bill Owens by “Republican” Dede Scozzafava came only after a call from White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel asking that she throw her support behind the Democrat.

NY 23, are you going to let the Obama White House control your Republican candidates?

See also:
GOP watch: Chaos in NY-23
Congressional Roundup: NY-23 edition
Last-minute NY 23rd poll: Conservative Doug Hoffman surges, but …

Ain’t but one Republican still in the NY 23 race, vote accordingly.

And, if you live in Virginia, you can phone the win in, but you still have to actually get off your collective Republican asses and vote for McDonnell, nuke the election from orbit, just to make sure.

/finally, if you’re a Democrat, remember, you get to vote on Wedbesday, 11/4/09

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Keep Counting Until You Win, It’s The Democrat Way

franken-794120bmp

Court declares Franken winner; Coleman to appeal

After a trial spanning nearly three months, Norm Coleman’s attempt to reverse Al Franken’s lead in the recount of the U.S. Senate election was soundly rejected today by a three-judge panel that dismissed the Republican’s lawsuit.

The judges swept away Coleman’s argument that the election and its aftermath were fraught with systemic errors that made the results invalid.

“The overwhelming weight of the evidence indicates that the Nov. 4, 2008, election was conducted fairly, impartially and accurately,” the panel said in its unanimous decision.

In rejecting Coleman’s arguments, the panel said the Republican essentially asked it to ignore Minnesota election requirements and adopt a more lenient standard allowing illegal absentee ballots to be counted.

The panel also rejected Coleman’s comparison of Senate election problems to those in the 2000 presidential race in Florida.

Unlike Florida, Minnesota has statewide standards for absentee voting that are “uniform and explicit and apply in every county and city,” the panel wrote.

See also:
Court: Franken won most votes; Coleman to appeal
Minn. court declares Franken leading vote-getter
Court: Franken defeats Coleman
Democrat wins round in Minnesota U.S. Senate race
MN-Sen: Franken declared the winner
Media Ignore Fact that Minn. Recount Boss Mark Ritchie an ACORN Ally
2006 Endorsements
Court Finds For Franken
Norm Coleman for US Senate

How do you find more than 1000 votes to go from losing by more than 700 votes on election day, six months ago, to winning by more than 300 votes today, after a canvass, recount, and court challenge? Well, you start by “finding” hundreds of ballots, in places like car trunks, days after the election is over. Then, during the canvass, you count hundreds of duplicate ballots in several Franken districts. Next, during the recount, you rely on Minnesota Secretary of State Mark Ritchie, a huge ACORN Democrat to shepherd your campaign over the finish line for the big win. Finally, you depend on the Democrat dominated Minnesota judiciary to put the stamp of approval on your stunning 900 vote, reversal of fortune, come from behind victory, and then add another 100 votes to the margin, just for good measure.

I watched the recount and, living in Minnesota, have been paying close attention to this saga since election day. The scope of the irregularities is mind boggling.

Unlike Florida, Minnesota has statewide standards for absentee voting that are “uniform and explicit and apply in every county and city,” the panel wrote.

Are they joking? Many counties refused to even participate in the absentee recount. There’s no way absentee recount election standards were consistently applied statewide or , for that matter, during the recount of election day ballots. There’s gigantic due process and equal protection issues here that deserve further appeal. This Senate election process and the resulting aftermath is so fundamentally and fatally flawed, the only equitable dispensation of justice is to order a special election.

Anyway, Norm’s next stop is the Minnesota Supreme Court, which will undoubtedly uphold the Panel’s ruling, and then it’s on to the U.S. Supreme Court on federal Constitutional grounds.

Republicans, as well as right minded people everywhere, should financially support Norm’s legal appeals as long as it takes and as far as they go, out of principle and, yes, for tactical partisan purposes. Franken’s victory comes by hook and crook, why should we give up before we at least run out the string of legal options?

/just remember, every day without Al Franken in the U.S. Senate is a markedly better day than the alternative