Don’t Get Caught In The Crossfire

The Duqu virus is squarely aimed at Iran’s nuclear program. Unless you’re connected with Iran’s nuclear program, your chances of being directly targeted are extremely low. However, Microsoft was freaked out enough to issue a security bulletin for Windows users. So, better safe than sorry, protect yourself against the possibility of becoming collateral damage in an epic, upcoming attack.

Microsoft issues Duqu virus workaround for Windows

Microsoft has issued a temporary fix to the pernicious Duqu virus — also known as “Son of Stuxnet” — which could affect users of Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 as well as Windows Server 2008.

The company promised the security update earlier this week as it races to deal with the virus, which targets victims via email with a Microsoft Word attachment. The virus is not in the email, but in the attachment itself. A Symantec researcher said if a user opens the Word document, the attacker could take control of the PC, and nose around in an organization’s network to look for data, and the virus could propagate itself.

See also:
Microsoft Security Advisory (2639658)
Microsoft software bug linked to ‘Duqu’ virus
Microsoft Provides Workaround Patch for Duqu Malware
Microsoft announces workaround for the Duqu exploit
Microsoft Issues Temporary Duqu Workaround, Plans 4 Patch Tuesday Fixes
Six Ways to Protect Yourself from Duqu
Microsoft Airs Temporary Fix to Defeat Duqu Worm
Microsoft Releases Temporary Plug For Duqu
Duqu exploits same Windows font engine patched last month, Microsoft confirms
5 Things To Do To Defend Against Duqu
Microsoft issues temporary ‘fix-it’ for Duqu zero-day
Patch Tuesday: Fix for ‘Duqu’ zero-day not likely this month

Is it just me or doesn’t it seem a bit more than odd that Microsoft, a company with close ties to and a past history of working with U.S. intelligence agencies, would publicly issue a workaround to defend against a specific piece of malware that, by many accounts, is being actively and currently used by U.S. intelligence agencies to set up and facilitate an upcoming attack, in cyberspace or otherwise, against Iran’s nuclear program? I mean, it’s not like the Iranians can’t read English, why help them defend against Duqu? Hmmm, something’s not quite right here.

/whatever’s going on, and something is going on, it’s way above my pay grade, but when the endgame comes, don’t forget to duck

Tuesday Fun With Microsoft

Windows, the software of perpetual patching. This installment is fairly large.

Microsoft Fixes Internet Explorer, Windows Flaws in October Patch Tuesday

Microsoft fixed 23 vulnerabilities across eight security bulletins as part of its October Patch Tuesday release.

October’s Patch Tuesday release resolved issues in Internet Explorer versions 6 through 9, all versions of Microsoft Windows from XP through 7, .NET and Silverlight, Microsoft Forefront Unified Access Gateway and Host Integration Server, Microsoft said Oct. 11. Two of the patches are rated “critical,” and six are rated “important,” Microsoft said.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-082 – Important
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-081 – Critical
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-080 – Important
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-079 – Important
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-078 – Critical
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-077 – Important
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-076 – Important
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-075 – Important
Microsoft’s October 2011 Patch Tuesday fixes 23 flaws, releases SIRv11
MS wipes out 23 flaws in October’s Patch Tuesday
Patch Internet Explorer Now
23 vulnerabilities squashed by Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday effort
Microsoft Update

So, get busy and happy patching!

/until the next time Microsoft releases patches to make its software suck less . . .

Tuesday Is The Time At Microsoft When We Patch

It’s a relatively small one this time, but critical.

Microsoft Fixes 22 Bugs in July Patch Tuesday

Microsoft addressed 22 security vulnerabilities across four security bulletins in July’s Patch Tuesday update. Three of the patches fix issues in the Windows operating system.

The four bulletins patched issues in all versions of the Windows operating system and in Microsoft Visio 2003 Service Pack 3, Microsoft said in its Patch Tuesday advisory, released July 12. Of the patches, only one has been rated “critical.” The remaining three are rated “important,” according to Microsoft.

“Today’s Patch Tuesday, though light, should not be ignored, as these patches address vulnerabilities that allow attackers to remotely execute arbitrary code on systems and use privilege escalation exploits,” said Dave Marcus, director of security research and communications at McAfee Labs.

Security experts ranked Microsoft bulletin MS11-053, which addressed a critical vulnerability in the Windows Bluetooth stack on Windows Vista and Windows 7, as the highest priority. Attackers could exploit the vulnerability by crafting and sending specially crafted Bluetooth packets to the target system to remotely take control, Microsoft said in its bulletin advisory.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for July 2011
Microsoft fixes 22 security holes
Microsoft issues critical patch for Windows 7, Vista users
Microsoft Releases 4 Updates for Windows and Office
Microsoft warns of critical security hole in Bluetooth stack
Security Experts Warn of Microsoft Bluetooth Vulnerability
Patch Tuesday Fixes Critical Bluetooth Flaw in Windows 7
‘Bluetooth sniper’ Windows vuln fix in light Patch Tuesday
Microsoft Squashes Bluetooth Bug
Microsoft patches ‘sexy’ Bluetooth bug in Vista, Windows 7
Microsoft Fixes 22 Bugs in July Patch Tuesday
Businesses should not ignore critical Microsoft Patch Tuesday update, say experts
Microsoft Patch Tuesday: four security bulletins
Microsoft Patch Tuesday – 12th July 2011
Windows Update

This isn’t the first time you’ve had to update Windows, you know what to do, so get busy.

/until next time, same patch time, same patch channel

Windows 7 Sucks!

Alrighty then. I had to add a new user, but the Active Trader Pro platform is finally up on the new laptop after two days. It looks like I’m still going to need to do some phone mojo during business hours to get the options trading platform running.

And boy oh boy, ultra fast and nifty new computer saddled with Windows 7, treats me like a two year old and fights me tooth and nail against everything I try and do. It really sucks.

/and now on to trying to install legacy software that I already know W7 is going to reject

The New Laptop Is Here!

The laptop itself is awesome! Wrangling the software into submission is another awful matter entirely, Windows 7 64 bit does not play very nice with my familiar, well broken in, just the way I like it, optimized XP world.

/this is going to be a long, hard slog, loud, intense, and sustained swearing is expected to ensue, hopefully I’ll be able to physically restrain myself from striking or otherwise damaging expensive computer hardware

Tuesday Fun With Microsoft

Give it up for Patch Tuesday, everyone’s favorite day of the month. Try and contain your excitement.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday Targets Four Bugs, One Critical

Microsoft on Tuesday issued three security bulletins that tackle four vulnerabilites. Just one of the vulnerabilities is rated critical. The other three are essentially the same bug, despite the fact that they affect three different products.

The first bug, MS11-015, describes two vulnerabilities in Windows Media. One, the only rated critical in this group, is a bug in Windows Media Center and Windows Media Player related to the handling of .dvr-ms files. It can lead to remote code execution in the context of user.

The other Windows Media bug, specifically in Microsoft DirectShow, is another instance of the insecure DLL loading bug that Microsoft and other vendors have been fixing for months. MS11-016 describes this bug in Microsoft Groove 2007 and MS11-017 describes it in the Windows Remote Desktop client.

Microsoft also released non-security updates today, including the monthly Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool, the update for the Windows Mail Junk E-mail Filter, and an update “to resolve issues” in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for March 2011
Microsoft Fixes Four Flaws
Microsoft patches critical Windows drive-by bug
Microsoft fixes critical Windows hole, others
Microsoft Patch Tuesday – three fixes for March, one critical, all ring coding alarms
Patch Tuesday: Gaping security hole in Windows Media Player
Critical Patch Tuesday Flaw Easy to Exploit
Go Plug Your Critical Hole
Microsoft Patch Tuesday leaves MHTML bug unchecked
Zero-day IE flaw not in Microsoft Patch Tuesday
Patch Tuesday Will Skip IE Before PWN2OWN Contest
March Patch Tuesday leaves IE unpatched for Pwn2Own hackers
Microsoft Releases Zero IE8 Security Updates Before “Pwn2Own” Browser Hacking Contest
Windows fix on Patch Tuesday ‘breaks’ VMware software
Microsoft Windows 7 Patches Wreak Havoc With VMware View
Windows 7 Update Breaks VMware Connection
Windows Update

As usual, Microsoft releases a patch that doesn’t even fix all the known issues and doesn’t play well with third party software. Particularly amusing is the fact that Microsoft is waiting to issue further patches until after a hacker contest is over fearing, with good reason, that the hackers will find even more Windows vulnerabilities.

/Microsoft Windows and Swiss cheese, what’s the difference?

It’s A Record Patchapalooza Tuesday!

Does Microsoft Windows suck? Um, why do you ask?

Microsoft drops record 14 bulletins in largest-ever Patch Tuesday

It’s a very busy Patch Tuesday for Windows users: 14 bulletins covering 34 serious security vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer, Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office, Silverlight, Microsoft XML Core Services and Server Message Block.

As previously reported, eight of the bulletins are rated “critical” because of the risk of remote code execution attacks. The other six are rated “important.”

The company also released a security advisory to warn of a new elevation of privilege issue in the Windows Service Isolation feature.

Windows users are urged to pay special attention to these four bulletins:

MS10-052 resolves a privately reported vulnerability in Microsoft’s MPEG Layer-3 audio codecs. The vulnerability could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted media file or receives specially crafted streaming content from a Web site. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the logged on user.

MS10-055 resolves a privately reported vulnerability in the Cinepak codec that could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted media file, or receives specially crafted streaming content from a Web. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the logged on user.

MS10-056 resolves four privately reported vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office. The most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user opens or previews a specially crafted RTF e-mail message. An attacker who successfully exploited any of these vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the local user. Windows Vista and Windows 7 are less exploitable due to additional heap mitigation mechanisms in those operating systems.

MS10-060 resolves two privately reported vulnerabilities, both of which could allow remote code execution, in Microsoft .NET Framework and Microsoft Silverlight.

As Computerworld’s Gregg Keizer points out, the August update was the biggest ever by number of security bulletins, and equaled the single-month record for individual patches.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for August 2010
MS10-052
MS10-055
MS10-056
MS10-060
Windows Update Home
Record Patch Tuesday yields critical Windows, IE fixes
Record Patch Tuesday: Where to Begin
It’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday: August 2010
Microsoft: Big Patch Tuesday for IT Administrators
Microsoft releases record number of security patches
Microsoft issues patches for a record 35 fresh security holes
Microsoft Issues Biggest Security Patch Yet

What the hell is Bill Gates selling anyway, a computer operating system or Swiss cheese?

/you’d better get busy downloading, this one takes a while, sucks if you have dial up