Do The Microsoft Patch Dance

The dance that never ends.

Microsoft Patch

Microsoft released 13 security bulletins, patching 22 vulnerabilities across its product line, including two critical updates affecting Internet Explorer and the Windows DNS Server.

While Microsoft issued fewer updates this month, August was still marked as a busy month for system administrators. Adobe Systems Inc., which issues fixes on a quarterly cycle, issued a critical security update late Tuesday, repairing seven flaws in its Shockwave Player, more than a dozen holes in its Flash Player and an error in its Flash Media Server.

Microsoft addressed seven vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer including two zero-day flaws. According to MS11-057, Microsoft said an attacker who successfully exploited any of the vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the local user. Microsoft said the most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted Web page using Internet Explorer

. . .

Another noteworthy bulletin is MS11-065, which resolves a vulnerability in the Remote Desktop Protocol. Although the security bulletin is rated important for users of Windows Server 2003, Miller said Microsoft has seen attacks targeting the flaw in the wild. The flaw can be targeted if an attacker sends a malicious remote desktop protocol connection request to the victim’s computer which could cause the system to crash.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for August 2011
Microsoft Fixes IE, Windows DNS Server Flaws In Patch Tuesday Update
Microsoft Patches 22 Security Holes
Microsoft Security Patch Fixes 20-Year-Old Flaw
Microsoft fixes 22 security bugs
Microsoft’s August Patch Tuesday security update to tackle critical flaws in IE and Windows Server
Your Microsoft Patch Tuesday update for August 2011
Microsoft to Fix 22 Software Flaws in Its August Patch Tuesday Update
Hefty Microsoft August Patch Delivers 13 Security Fixes
IE, Windows server bugs likely to be exploited soon
Microsoft expecting exploits for critical IE vulnerabilities
Microsoft Update

Get busy downloading.

/so, until the next Patch Tuesday . . .

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Tuesdays With Microsoft

Thankfully, it’s a relatively wee one.

Microsoft Unleashes Critical Update for Windows Server

Today is Patch Tuesday, and Microsoft is taking it easy on IT admins with a meager two security bulletins this month. But, don’t let the small number of updates lull you into a false sense of security. They may be few, but the patches this month are still crucial for network and computer security.

MS11-035 is rated as Critical and affects the WINS component of Windows Server 2003 and 2008, and MS11-036 is an Important security bulletins related to flaws in Microsoft PowerPoint.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for May 2011
Microsoft plugs critical hole in Windows
Microsoft Releases Patch Tuesday Fixes for Windows Server and PowerPoint
Microsoft Releases Critical Patch for Windows Servers
Microsoft distributes Windows, PowerPoint patches
Patch Tuesday updates fix a trio of Windows 7 SP1 glitches
Microsoft Fixes Critical Windows Internet Name Service Flaw In Two-Patch Release
Microsoft fixes critical worm hole in Windows Server
Microsoft downplays Server bug threat, say researchers
Windows Update

Now get off your ass and do the Microsoft patch dance!

/so, until next time, stay updated, same patch day, same patch channel

Okay Kids, It’s Tuesday, Remember What We Do On Tuesdays?

Why, we patch Windows on Tuesdays!

Microsoft Issues Four Patches, Fixes Critical Help Center Flaw

Microsoft (NSDQ:MSFT) released a mild bulletin for its July Patch Tuesday, repairing a total of five vulnerabilities with four security updates in Windows and Office, including a critical Help and Support Center flaw already exploited in the wild.

Of the four patches Microsoft released, three are considered critical, indicating that they can enable hackers to launch malicious attacks via remote code execution. The three critical flaws occur in both Microsoft Windows and Office, which included flaws in the Microsoft Help and Support Center, ActiveX and Canonical Display Driver. The fourth patch, ranked with the slightly less severe rating of “important,” occurs in Microsoft Outlook.

Hands down, security experts recommend that users apply a patch repairing a critical Help and Support Center flaw in Windows XP and supported editions of Windows Server 2003, which is currently being exploited in active attacks.

See also:
Microsoft security updates for July 2010
It’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday: July 2010
Microsoft Patch Tuesday for July 2010: four bulletins
Microsoft Issues Four Security Bulletins
Microsoft patches critical bugs in Windows, Office
Microsoft Patches Critical Security Holes, Ends Windows XP SP2 Support
One final patch for Windows XP Service Pack 2 before it reaches end-of-life
Microsoft Patches Windows, Office Bugs

You all know the drill for fixing this magnificent Bill Gates software.

/so, load ’em down, patch ’em up, patch ’em up, shut ’em down, boot ’em up, ride ’em on, Windows!

Microsoft Cleans Up After Chinese Hack Of Google, Obama Turns The Other Cheek

Microsoft to release patch for IE hole on Thursday

Microsoft said on Wednesday that it will release on Thursday a patch to fix the latest hole in Internet Explorer that was used in the China-based attack on Google and for which an exploit has been released on the Internet since last week.

The company plans to release the patch as close to 10 a.m. PST on Thursday as possible and host a public Webcast at 1 p.m. PST, according to the security advisory.

Microsoft continues to see limited attacks and has only seen evidence of successful attacks against Internet Explorer 6, according to Jerry Bryant, senior security program manager at Microsoft.

“This is a standard cumulative update, accelerated from our regularly scheduled February release, for Internet Explorer with an aggregate severity rating of Critical,” he said in a statement.

“It addresses the vulnerability related to recent attacks against Google and a small subset of corporations, as well as several other vulnerabilities. Once applied, customers are protected against the known attacks that have been widely publicized,” Bryant said. “We recommend that customers install the update as soon as it is available. For customers using automatic updates, this update will automatically be applied once it is released.”

Vulnerable software is IE 6 on Microsoft Windows 2000 and IE 6, 7, and 8 on supported editions of Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2, Microsoft said.

So, while China continues its relentless, covert cyberwar against U.S. and other Western commercial, government, and military targets, stealing information and secrets and causing economic and national security damage to our computer networks, guess what the Obama administration has decided to do, against the advice of U.S. intelligence officials and experts?

China removed as top priority for spies

The White House National Security Council recently directed U.S. spy agencies to lower the priority placed on intelligence collection for China, amid opposition to the policy change from senior intelligence leaders who feared it would hamper efforts to obtain secrets about Beijing’s military and its cyber-attacks.

The downgrading of intelligence gathering on China was challenged by Director of National Intelligence Dennis C. Blair and CIA Director Leon E. Panetta after it was first proposed in interagency memorandums in October, current and former intelligence officials said.

The decision downgrades China from “Priority 1” status, alongside Iran and North Korea, to “Priority 2,” which covers specific events such as the humanitarian crisis after the Haitian earthquake or tensions between India and Pakistan.

The National Security Council staff, in response, pressed ahead with the change and sought to assure Mr. Blair and other intelligence chiefs that the change would not affect the allocation of resources for spying on China or the urgency of focusing on Chinese spying targets, the officials told The Washington Times.

White House National Security Council officials declined to comment on the intelligence issue. Mike Birmingham, a spokesman for Mr. Blair, declined to comment. A CIA spokesman also declined to comment.

But administration officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the new policy is part of the Obama administration’s larger effort to develop a more cooperative relationship with Beijing.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for January 2010
New IE hole exploited in attacks on U.S. firms
Microsoft Scrambles to Patch Browser
Microsoft patching “Google hack” flaw in IE tomorrow
Microsoft Security Bulletin MS10-002 Coming Thursday for IE Zero-Day
Microsoft to issue “Google attack” browser patch
Microsoft to issue emergency IE patch Thursday
Microsoft will issue emergency IE patch on Thursday
China removed as top priority for spies
China no longer top priority for intelligence gathering: White House
‘China no longer top priority for intelligence gathering’
China: Still an Intelligence Priority

Relax, don’t worry, the country is in the very best of hands.

/Obama’s NSC, more than a dozen morons stuffed in a four passenger clown car

Bill Gates Strikes Again

Microsoft warns of serious computer security hole

Microsoft Corp. has taken the rare step of warning about a serious computer security vulnerability it hasn’t fixed yet.

The vulnerability disclosed Monday affects Internet Explorer users whose computers run the Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 operating software.

It can allow hackers to remotely take control of victims’ machines. The victims don’t need to do anything to get infected except visit a Web site that’s been hacked.

Security experts say criminals have been attacking the vulnerability for nearly a week. Thousands of sites have been hacked to serve up malicious software that exploits the vulnerability. People are drawn to these sites by clicking a link in spam e-mail.

The so-called “zero day” vulnerability disclosed by Microsoft affects a part of its software used to play video. The problem arises from the way the software interacts with Internet Explorer, which opens a hole for hackers to tunnel into.

Microsoft urged vulnerable users to disable the problematic part of its software, which can be done from Microsoft’s Web site, while the company works on a “patch” — or software fix — for the problem.

See also:
Microsoft Security Advisory (972890)
Microsoft: Attacks on Unpatched Windows Flaw
Windows users ambushed by attack on fresh IE flaw
Hackers exploit second DirectShow zero-day using thousands of hijacked sites
New attack code targets Microsoft ActiveX zero-day vulnerability
Zero-Day Video Exploit Hits Windows XP
Zero-day Windows flaw fuels IE attacks

/let’s have a big round of applause for Bill and his magnificent software