Operation AI

It was seventy years ago today . . .

Nation pauses to remember Pearl Harbor

Survivors of the surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor gathered Wednesday to remember the 2,400 people who lost their lives exactly 70 years ago.

“Just as every day and unlike any other day, we stop and stand fast in memory of our heroes of Pearl Harbor and the Second World War,” Rear Adm. Frank Ponds, commander for Navy region Hawaii, told the gathering.

U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus took note of the devastating legacy of the two-hour attack on Pearl Harbor 70 years ago.

“The history of December 7, 1941, is indelibly imprinted on the memory of every American who was alive that day. But it bears repeating on every anniversary, so that every subsequent generation will know what happened here today and never forget,” Mabus said.

See also:
Nation marks 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor Day: Survivors remember attack, pay respects on 70th anniversary
Nation marks 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor
Survivors, veterans mark somber Pearl Harbor remembrance
Pearl Harbor survivor remembers day of infamy
Senator Inouye Recalls Pearl Harbor Attack’s ‘Black Puffs of Explosion’
Pearl Harbor survivors group says it will disband
Veteran Of Pearl Harbor Dies On Anniversary Of Attack
Pearl Harbor survivors return to ships after death
Pearl Harbor survivors who lived until their 90s have their ashes interred in their ships
Overview of The Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941
Attack at Pearl Harbor, 1941
Attack on Pearl Harbor

Never forget.

/and more importantly, never let it happen again

Two Less Al Qaeda In My Neck Of The Woods

Unfortunately, this is just the tip of the iceberg. For several years now, U.S. Somali citizens have been recruited in Minnesota and have traveled to Somalia to train and fight with al Qaeda. The big problem with that is, as U.S. citizens, there’s nothing stopping these newly minted terrorists from bringing their al Qaeda training back home and carrying out terrorist attacks here, in Minnesota or elsewhere in the country. They certainly have a strong, established support base here, a close knit Somali community that isn’t particularly loyal to the United States and what it stands for.

2 Minnesota Women Convicted of Funneling Money to Terror Group in Somalia

Two Minnesota women who claimed they were helping the poor in Somalia were convicted Thursday of conspiring to funnel money to a terrorist group as part of what prosecutors called a “deadly pipeline” sending funds and fighters to al-Shabab.

After the verdicts, one of the women, Amina Farah Ali, told the judge through an interpreter that she was happy because she was “going to heaven no matter what,” and condemned those in authority, saying: “You will go to hell.” She was ordered into custody pending her sentencing.

Ali, 35, and Hawo Mohamed Hassan, 64, were each charged with conspiracy to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization. Ali also faced 12 counts of providing such support, for allegedly sending more than $8,600 to al-Shabab from September 2008 through July 2009, while Hassan faced two counts of lying to the FBI.

Both were found guilty on all counts. The terrorism-related counts each carry up to 15 years in prison, while lying to the FBI carries up to eight years. No sentencing date was set, and prosecutors said it was too early to predict what sentence they’d recommend.

See also:
Rochester women guilty of aiding Somali terror group
Jury convicts 2 Minn. women in terror case
Rochester women guilty on all 16 counts in terror-funding case
Jury Finds Rochester Women Guilty of Aiding Terrorism
Two Minnesota women convicted of aiding terrorists by ‘funnelling money to Somali terror group al-Shabab’
Two US women guilty of funding Somali terror
2 Minn. women guilty of aiding Somalian terror group
Two women found guilty of aiding terrorism
Minnesota women convicted of helping fund Somali group
Jury convicts 2 women in Somalia terror case
Terror suspect resists the rules of court and jail

Over the centuries, Minnesota has been a veritable melting pot for a plethora of immigrant groups, Germans, Hmong, Latinos, Norwegians, Swedes, you name it. Yet only the Somalis are actively involved in terrorism, why might that be, what sets the Somalis apart from all the other immigrant groups that have settled in Minnesota throughout history?

/of course the answer is easy and hardly surprising, where Islam goes, trouble follows