Don’t Get Caught In The Crossfire

The Duqu virus is squarely aimed at Iran’s nuclear program. Unless you’re connected with Iran’s nuclear program, your chances of being directly targeted are extremely low. However, Microsoft was freaked out enough to issue a security bulletin for Windows users. So, better safe than sorry, protect yourself against the possibility of becoming collateral damage in an epic, upcoming attack.

Microsoft issues Duqu virus workaround for Windows

Microsoft has issued a temporary fix to the pernicious Duqu virus — also known as “Son of Stuxnet” — which could affect users of Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 as well as Windows Server 2008.

The company promised the security update earlier this week as it races to deal with the virus, which targets victims via email with a Microsoft Word attachment. The virus is not in the email, but in the attachment itself. A Symantec researcher said if a user opens the Word document, the attacker could take control of the PC, and nose around in an organization’s network to look for data, and the virus could propagate itself.

See also:
Microsoft Security Advisory (2639658)
Microsoft software bug linked to ‘Duqu’ virus
Microsoft Provides Workaround Patch for Duqu Malware
Microsoft announces workaround for the Duqu exploit
Microsoft Issues Temporary Duqu Workaround, Plans 4 Patch Tuesday Fixes
Six Ways to Protect Yourself from Duqu
Microsoft Airs Temporary Fix to Defeat Duqu Worm
Microsoft Releases Temporary Plug For Duqu
Duqu exploits same Windows font engine patched last month, Microsoft confirms
5 Things To Do To Defend Against Duqu
Microsoft issues temporary ‘fix-it’ for Duqu zero-day
Patch Tuesday: Fix for ‘Duqu’ zero-day not likely this month

Is it just me or doesn’t it seem a bit more than odd that Microsoft, a company with close ties to and a past history of working with U.S. intelligence agencies, would publicly issue a workaround to defend against a specific piece of malware that, by many accounts, is being actively and currently used by U.S. intelligence agencies to set up and facilitate an upcoming attack, in cyberspace or otherwise, against Iran’s nuclear program? I mean, it’s not like the Iranians can’t read English, why help them defend against Duqu? Hmmm, something’s not quite right here.

/whatever’s going on, and something is going on, it’s way above my pay grade, but when the endgame comes, don’t forget to duck

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Do You Own A Sony HackStation?

You’ve probably already noticed that your Sony PlayStation won’t connect to the online network, but do you know that hackers probably stole all your personal data, including your credit card number, too?

User data stolen in Sony PlayStation Network hack attack

Sony is warning its millions of PlayStation Network users to watch out for identity-theft scams after hackers breached its security and plundered the user names, passwords, addresses, birth dates, and other information used to register accounts.

The stolen information may also include payment-card data, purchase history, billing addresses, and security answers used to change passwords, Sony said on Tuesday. The company plans to keep the hacked system offline for the time being, and to restore services gradually. The advisory also applies to users of Sony’s related Qriocity network.

See also:
Sony Warns Online Hacker May Have Stolen Credit Card Data
Sony’s PlayStation Network and Qriocity hacked
77million PlayStation accounts hacked
Breach at Sony may include profiles
Massive data breach suspected in Sony PlayStation hacker attack
Sony: Card details may be compromised
Millions of PlayStation user’s information hacked
PlayStation Network hacked, data stolen: how badly is Sony hurt?
Sony’s PlayStation Network Hacked, User Data Stolen
Sony Explains Delayed Response to Hacked PSN Accounts
Sony’s PlayStation Network Is Hacked

With 77 million potential victims, this could wind up being the largest data theft in history. If you own a PlaySyation, make sure you keep an eye on your credit card account for any unusual activity and change your passwords and probably as much other PlayStation Network account information as you can as soon as the system goes back online.

/and watch out for phishing attacks, if Sony contacts you, make damn sure it’s actually Sony

Do You Know What Day Is It?

You know damn well what day it is, it’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday!

Microsoft Plugs 22 Security Vulnerabilities on Patch Tuesday

Microsoft plugged 22 security holes today in the second Patch Tuesday of the year.

The fixes are included in 12 security bulletins spanning Windows, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office and IIS. Three of the bulletins are rated “critical” while the other nine are considered “important.”

Within the critical bulletins are fixes for a bug in the Windows Graphics Rendering Engine Microsoft warned users about in January, as well as a vulnerability in IE (Internet Explorer) resulting from the creation of uninitialized memory during a CSS (cascading style sheet) function within IE. The company issued the advisory for the IE flaw in December, and has seen limited, targeted attacks focused on the vulnerability.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for February 2011
Microsoft patches Windows, IE
Microsoft Fixes 22 Security Holes – 6 Critical
Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday: 6 Critical Fixes
Microsoft Patch Tuesday Swats 22 Bugs, Misses MHTML Flaw
How to Prioritize Microsoft Patch Tuesday
Bug bounty program reveals 22 unpatched flaws, 5 in Office
Microsoft delivers ‘big month’ of patches, quashes 22 bugs
February Microsoft Patch Targets 20-Plus Security Flaws
Microsoft patches critical flaws in IE, Windows Shell Graphics
Microsoft addresses 22 vulnerabilities in monthly patch release
Microsoft finally says adios to Autorun
Microsoft Update Trims USB AutoRun For Security
Windows Update

Who Nellie, that’s a whole lot of patch! And, as usual, it doesn’t even correct all the problems with the software.

/so, until next time, happy patching!

It’s A Record Patchapalooza Tuesday!

Does Microsoft Windows suck? Um, why do you ask?

Microsoft drops record 14 bulletins in largest-ever Patch Tuesday

It’s a very busy Patch Tuesday for Windows users: 14 bulletins covering 34 serious security vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer, Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office, Silverlight, Microsoft XML Core Services and Server Message Block.

As previously reported, eight of the bulletins are rated “critical” because of the risk of remote code execution attacks. The other six are rated “important.”

The company also released a security advisory to warn of a new elevation of privilege issue in the Windows Service Isolation feature.

Windows users are urged to pay special attention to these four bulletins:

MS10-052 resolves a privately reported vulnerability in Microsoft’s MPEG Layer-3 audio codecs. The vulnerability could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted media file or receives specially crafted streaming content from a Web site. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the logged on user.

MS10-055 resolves a privately reported vulnerability in the Cinepak codec that could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted media file, or receives specially crafted streaming content from a Web. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the logged on user.

MS10-056 resolves four privately reported vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office. The most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user opens or previews a specially crafted RTF e-mail message. An attacker who successfully exploited any of these vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the local user. Windows Vista and Windows 7 are less exploitable due to additional heap mitigation mechanisms in those operating systems.

MS10-060 resolves two privately reported vulnerabilities, both of which could allow remote code execution, in Microsoft .NET Framework and Microsoft Silverlight.

As Computerworld’s Gregg Keizer points out, the August update was the biggest ever by number of security bulletins, and equaled the single-month record for individual patches.

See also:
Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for August 2010
MS10-052
MS10-055
MS10-056
MS10-060
Windows Update Home
Record Patch Tuesday yields critical Windows, IE fixes
Record Patch Tuesday: Where to Begin
It’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday: August 2010
Microsoft: Big Patch Tuesday for IT Administrators
Microsoft releases record number of security patches
Microsoft issues patches for a record 35 fresh security holes
Microsoft Issues Biggest Security Patch Yet

What the hell is Bill Gates selling anyway, a computer operating system or Swiss cheese?

/you’d better get busy downloading, this one takes a while, sucks if you have dial up